Coronavirus/COVID-19 | The City of Lakewood, Ohio

Coronavirus/COVID-19


Ohio COVID-19 Numbers –
Updated 1/15/21 2:00 PM

Total Cases: 814,442
Total Deaths: 10,057

Covid-19 Resources

Ohio Department of Health Checklists & FAQs

State of Ohio Coronavirus/COVID-19 web page: coronavirus.ohio.gov

CDC web page: coronavirus.gov

Click here to view Governor DeWine’s daily press conferences.

Lakewood Businesses: click here for information about resources for businesses affected by Coronavirus/COVID-19.

Click here for a listing of COVID-19 updates/closures by department.

Early Childhood COVID-19 Resource List


Update January 15, 2020 1:30 PM

Vaccinations in Phase 1B are expected to begin the week of January 18th. Governor DeWine announced a tiered system for offering vaccinations to the estimated 2.2 million people who are eligible for the vaccine under this phase, beginning with those who are 80 or older. When a new age group begins, vaccinations may not be complete for the previous age group. It will take a number of weeks to distribute all of the vaccine given the limited doses available.

  • Beginning January 19: Ohioans 80 years of age and older.
  • The week of Jan. 25: Ohioans 75 years of age and older; those with severe congenital or developmental disorders.
  • The week of Feb. 1: Ohioans 70 years of age and older; employees of K-12 schools that wish to remain or return to in-person or hybrid models.
  • The week of Feb. 8: Ohioans 65 years of age and older.

The Ohio Department of Health launched a tool on vaccine.coronavirus.ohio.gov to assist citizens looking for a provider that has been allotted vaccines. The tool will be searchable by zip code or county, but it will not be updated in real-time. It is critical that those eligible to receive a vaccine consult local sources to determine up-to-date vaccine availability.

Senior citizens with questions on the vaccination process are urged to contact the Area Agencies on Aging at www.aging.ohio.gov or by calling 1-866-243-5678.

Update January 14, 2020 6:30 PM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

PHASE 1B VACCINATIONS

Governor DeWine today highlighted the vaccine distribution timeline for Phase 1B of Ohio’s vaccination program, which is set to begin next week for those ages 80 and up.

Week of January 18: Vaccine providers will begin receiving their first allotment of vaccines for those ages 80 and older. Vaccines will be delivered on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Each provider will begin administering vaccines the day after they receive their shipment. All vaccines must be distributed within seven days.

Week of January 25: Vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 75 and up following the same process outlined above. Vaccinations will also be available to those with severe congenital, developmental, or early-onset medical disorders. Additional information on how these individuals can choose to receive their vaccines is forthcoming.

Week of February 1: Vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 70 and up following the same process outlined above.

Week of February 8: Vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 65 and up following the same process outlined above.

“When a new age range opens, that does not mean vaccinations will be complete for the previous age range,” said Governor DeWine. “Vaccinating Ohioans in Phase 1B will take a number of weeks given the limited doses available.”

Beginning tomorrow, Ohioans aged 80 and up can find additional information about providers administering vaccines by calling their local health department or visiting their local health department website.

Additionally, the Ohio Department of Health will launch a tool tomorrow morning on coronavirus.ohio.gov to assist residents looking for a provider that has been allotted vaccines.

The tool will be searchable by zip code or county, but it will not be updated in real-time. It is critical that those eligible to receive a vaccine consult local resources to determine up-to-date vaccine availability.

“Providers throughout the state are developing systems that work best for them in terms of scheduling and administering vaccinations,” said Governor DeWine. “As we continue to rollout additional vaccination groups, we will work with our local partners, and modify the process as needed.”

The Ohio Department of Health is in the process of developing a state vaccination scheduling system.  Additional information is forthcoming.

NURSING HOME VACCINATIONS

Governor DeWine announced that Ohio is imminently close to completing the administration of the first round of COVID-19 vaccines in skilled nursing facilities.

“When we started distributing the vaccine in Ohio, one of our first goals was to vaccinate our most vulnerable in our nursing facilities,” said Governor DeWine.

Ohio partnered with four pharmacies through the Federal Pharmacy Partnership in distribution of the vaccine to skilled nursing facilities. These facilities are a part of Phase 1A.

Absolute has administered 100% of the first round of COVID-19 vaccines as assigned.

As of yesterday, CVS has administered 97% of the first round of COVID-19 vaccines at the 478 assigned facilities. It is anticipated CVS will finish the administration of doses this week.

Pharm Script has completed 61 of 63 assigned facilities, and will complete the administration of doses today.

Walgreens has completed 95% of the first round of COVID-19 vaccines at the 398 assigned facilities.

Within the Federal Pharmacy Partnership, Ohio, with 3.6% of the U.S population, has administered more than 8% of the vaccines in this program nationwide.  This is above the anticipated pace of administering the vaccine.

OHIO COUNTY COVID DATA

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

All 88 counties have a level of spread that is at least three times more than what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers high incidence.

Governor DeWine also discussed key measurements regarding incidence cases per 100,000 residents over two weeks, as well as regional COVID-19 ICU utilization.

“We saw new cases per capita at the statewide level increase since last week, which indicates that COVID-19 continues to spread in both urban and rural communities throughout Ohio,” said Governor DeWine.

Update January 12, 2020 6:00 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

PHASE 1B TIMELINE

Governor DeWine today reemphasized the vaccine distribution timeline for Phase 1B of Ohio’s vaccination program which is set to begin next week with those ages 80 and older.

This week: Today, the Ohio Department of Health will receive information from the federal government on Ohio’s vaccine allotment for the upcoming week. This information, including which providers will receive vaccines and how many, will be communicated to local health departments this evening. Each county health department, in partnership with their local emergency management agency and vaccine providers, will communicate vaccine distribution plans with the media and the public on Wednesday and Thursday. The process to vaccinate those in each county will vary depending on the provider. Some are expected to hold walk-up clinics, others may take appointments, etc.

On Thursday, the Ohio Department of Health will launch a tool on coronavirus.ohio.gov to assist citizens looking for a provider that has been allotted vaccines. The tool will be searchable by zip code or county, but it will not be updated in real-time. It is critical that those eligible to receive a vaccine consult local sources to determine up-to-date vaccine availability.

Hospitals that are vaccinating their frontline healthcare workers as part of Phase 1A must complete these vaccinations by Sunday, January 17.

Week of January 18: Vaccine providers will begin receiving their first allotment of vaccines for those ages 80 and older. Vaccines will be delivered on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Each provider will begin administering vaccines the day after they receive their shipment. All vaccines must be distributed within seven days.

Week of January 25: Vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 75 and up following the same process outlined above. Vaccinations will also be available to those with severe congenital, developmental, or early-onset medical disorders. Additional information on how these individuals can choose to receive their vaccines is forthcoming.

Week of February 1: Vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 70 and up following the same process outlined above.

Week of February 8: Vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 65 and up following the same process outlined above.

Vaccine providers are not expected to vaccinate everyone in each age group in one week. As new age groups are authorized to receive vaccinations, previous age groups will continue receiving the vaccine.

Senior citizens with questions on the vaccination process are urged to contact the Area Agencies on Aging at www.aging.ohio.gov or by calling 1-866-243-5678.

NURSING HOME VACCINATIONS

To date, 85 percent of Ohio’s nursing homes have been visited by a vaccine provider as part of Phase 1A. Vaccine providers anecdotally tell the Ohio Department of Health that the number of residents and staff accepting the vaccine is increasing.

In Ohio’s two nursing homes operated by the Ohio Department of Veteran Services, 92 percent of veterans have accepted the vaccine. Regarding staff, 60 percent have opted to receive the vaccine in the Sandusky home and 42 percent have chosen to be vaccinated in the Georgetown home.

BROADBAND EXPANSION INVESTMENT

Lt. Governor Husted announced today that Southern Ohio Communication Services, Inc., in collaboration with JobsOhio, Ohio Southeast Economic Development (OhioSE) and Pike County Economic & Community Development, plans to invest $3.8 million to provide high-speed Internet service over 64 miles to 1,300 residential and business customers in southern Ohio.  Southern Ohio Communications Service received a $50,000 JobsOhio Inclusion Grant toward building and engineering costs. Learn more about the announcement here.

INDUSTRY SECTOR PARTNERSHIP AWARDS

Lt. Governor Husted also announced that 12 partnerships have been awarded for a total of $2.5 million for the Industry Sector Partnership Award Grant Program. The selected partnerships are located in various regions across Ohio and focus on multiple in-demand industry sectors, including healthcare, information technology, manufacturing, construction and transportation.

“These awards will jumpstart and expand workforce partnerships across Ohio that are helping more individuals earn the skills needed to successfully find employment,” Lt. Governor Husted said. “This is real-world skill development where educators and businesses work together to help people gain the skills they need to get hired for jobs that pay well and have a future. Enhancing meaningful partnerships between the business and education community is key to growing Ohio’s workforce and filling in-demand jobs at a time when many people are looking for opportunities, but not sure where to start.”

Learn more about the Industry Sector Partnership Grant by visiting Workforce.Ohio.gov/ISP

Update January 8, 2020 5:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 50,450 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

Covid Cases in Cuyahoga County by Zip Code Map

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 1651-2886.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update January 7, 2020 5:30 PM

Governor Mike DeWine, and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

OHIO COUNTY COVID DATA

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

All 88 counties have a level of spread that is at least three times more than what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers high incidence. Governor DeWine encouraged Ohioans to look more closely at the chart below, which shows the number of positive cases per 1,000 residents.

PHASE 1B VACCINATIONS

Governor DeWine announced those in Phase 1B will be able to receive vaccinations beginning on Tuesday, January 19. Those 80 years of age and older will be prioritized first in this next phase, roughly totaling 420,000 Ohioans. Ohio is expected to receive 100,000 doses during the first week of distribution to Phase 1B.

“With up to 420,000 people 80 years and above, and only 100,000 doses available the first week, it will take several weeks to vaccinate those 80 years of age and older,” said Governor DeWine. “Phase 1B will take a few weeks, and a lot of coordination in distribution.”

Vaccines for Ohioans 80 years of age and older will be administered by physicians, local health departments, hospitals, federally qualified health centers, in-home health service providers, and some retail pharmacies.  As of today, the Ohio Department of Health has approximately 1,700 providers registered to distribute vaccines.

Additionally, the Ohio Department of Health will be hosting a webinar for registered providers to discuss expectations, and instructions for distribution. Additional details will be shared with registered providers in the coming days.

Governor DeWine anticipates vaccinations will be available to Ohioans 75 years of age and older beginning Monday, January 25. The following week, vaccinations will be available to those 65 years of age and older.

“As we include other age ranges, please know that does not mean vaccinations will be complete for the previous age range,” said Governor DeWine.

The week of January 25 will also include vaccinations for Ohioans with severe congenital, developmental, or early onset medical disorders.  Additional details about distribution for this group will be forthcoming.

During the week of February 1, Governor DeWine announced that vaccinations will be available for personnel in Ohio schools.  The Ohio Department of Heath will send forms to Ohio superintendents to indicate their school plans to go back to in full in-person and hybrid learning by March 1, as well as indicate the number of staff they believe will choose to take the vaccination.  Superintendents will also be asked if a community partner has been identified to help with the administering of the COVID-19 vaccines to school personnel.

Additional information about vaccinations can be found at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

BROADBANDOHIO CONNECTIVITY GRANT

Lt. Governor Husted today announced that the deadline for the BroadbandOhio Connectivity Grant, which provided $50 million to schools to help them purchase equipment for students to access the internet, has been extended. This program helps schools to fund everything from hotspots, to Wi-Fi, to access points on school busses. The grant was funded using Coronavirus Relief Funds (CRF) from the CARES Act.

The deadline to spend these funds was originally December 30, 2020, however, a second federal stimulus bill was signed at the of December, which extended the CRF expenditure deadline an additional year, until December 31, 2021. As a result, this administration extended the deadline for the BroadbandOhio Connectivity Grant to the same date, December 31, 2021.

School districts now have more time to spend these funds for services they provide to students to keep them online.

More information about the grant program can be found at ohio-k12.help.

AMENDED HEALTH ORDER

Governor DeWine announced that Ohio Department of Health Director Stephanie McCloud signed the Sixth Amended Director’s Order to Limit Access to Ohio’s Nursing Homes and Similar Facilities, with Exceptions.

This revised order clarifies that in-person compassionate care visits are permitted in nursing homes and similar facilities. The new order does not change required precautions all visitors must take, including but not limited to, wearing of a facial covering and social distancing.

Update January 5, 2020 5:30 PM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, Lt. Governor Jon Husted, and Ohio Department of Health Chief Medical Officer Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

VACCINATION PHASES

Governor DeWine today recapped Phases 1A and 1B of Ohio’s vaccine distribution plan. Because the availability of the vaccine remains limited in Ohio and across the country, Ohio is taking a phased approach that prioritizes the most vulnerable citizens, those in the healthcare field, and school staff members.

Phase 1A, which is currently underway, includes approximately 1 million Ohioans

Ohio's Vaccination Program Graphic

It is anticipated that vaccine distribution in Phase 1B will begin as Phase 1A begins to wind down.

Phase 1B focuses largely on those who are 65 and older. Those in this age group are most vulnerable to COVID-19 and make up more than 87 percent of Ohioans who have died from the virus. Phase 1B also includes school teachers and other school staff who will be offered the vaccine in an effort to get Ohio’s children back to school as soon as possible. In total, Phase 1B includes an estimated 2.2 million people.

Details of future phases of the vaccination plan will be announced as Phases 1A and 1B progress and as Ohio receives vaccines for the future phases. Ohio is currently receiving roughly 100,000 vaccines each week, although that number could increase if more vaccines are approved for administration.

NURSING HOME VACCINATIONS

As of Sunday, approximately 61 percent of nursing homes in Ohio have been visited by a pharmacy vaccine provider. Of those locations, only approximately 40 percent of staff members have chosen to receive the vaccination. Of nursing home residents, approximately 75 to 80 percent of residents have decided to receive the vaccine.

Nursing home staff and residents who have received their first dose of vaccine will begin receiving second doses on Friday. Governor DeWine encouraged those in nursing homes who initially declined to receive the vaccine to get their first dose as part of this second round. Following this opportunity, it may be some time before a first dose is available again.

VACCINE DISCUSSIONS FOR LONG-TERM CARE PROVIDERS

The Ohio Department of Aging will be hosting live discussions to help educate long-term care providers about the importance of the COVID-19 vaccine. State and community vaccine experts will be available to answer questions about the vaccine, and participants will have the opportunity to offer input to help state leaders make decisions to guide Ohio out of the pandemic.

VIRUS VARIANT

Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff, Chief Medical Officer for the Ohio Department of Health, provided information related to the coronavirus variation that was first seen in the United Kingdom.

“Although virus variations are normal, and most do not impact the behavior of a virus, this variation is notable because it appears to be more contagious than other variants of the coronavirus,” said Dr. Vanderhoff. “Fortunately, this variant doesn’t appear to be more severe or to impact those who are already immune, but it worries us because a more contagious variant could lead to more people getting sick, more people being hospitalized, and more people dying.”

Ohio currently has three times the number of COVID-19 hospitalizations that it had on November 1 and nearly seven times the number of COVID-19 hospitalizations that it had on October 1.

Dr. Vanderhoff stressed the importance of continuing Ohio’s coronavirus protocols of social distancing, avoiding crowds, washing hands, wearing masks, and accepting the vaccine when available to prevent the spread of all variants of the coronavirus and to prevent further increases in hospitalizations.

VACCINE REDISTRIBUTION PLANS

The Ohio Department of Health will be issuing a directive requiring vaccine providers to develop a surplus vaccine redistribution plan. The directive follows a recent incident in which a long-term care facility in Ohio overestimated the number of vaccine doses needed for residents and staff. Seven vials of vaccine (35 doses) were not administered and expired.

“Every vaccine dose that Ohio receives must be administered,” said Governor DeWine. “Each vaccine represents a potential life saved, and it is our obligation to ensure that not a single dose is wasted.”

Vaccine redistribution plans will prioritize recipients based on Phase 1A and 1B vaccine distribution criteria. If a significant number of doses remain, vaccine providers must contact the Ohio Department of Health for immediate redistribution assistance.

NEXT ROUND OF TECHCRED NOW OPEN

Lt. Governor Jon Husted today announced that the seventh round of TechCred – a program that helps businesses upskill their current and incoming workforce with tech-focused credentials – is now open until January 29.

Ohio businesses can receive up to $2,000 for each tech-focused credential earned, up to $30,000 per employer each application period. Since the program’s start, a total of 966 Ohio employers have been approved for funding, supporting the earning of 15,105 tech-focused credentials by Ohio employees.

To learn more and apply, businesses can visit TechCred.Ohio.Gov.

BAR & RESTAURANT FUND DEADLINE EXTENDED

The Lt. Governor also announced that the deadline to apply for the Bar and Restaurant Assistance Fund has been extended to January 31.

There are approximately 15,400 on-premises liquor permits in the state eligible for assistance. Of that, roughly 10,854 or 70 percent have taken advantage of this funding opportunity as of today.

Governor DeWine designated $38.7 million of funding received by the State of Ohio from the federal CARES Act to provide $2,500 assistance payments to on-premise liquor permit holders to help them through the financial difficulties experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic, and each active on-premises liquor permit is eligible for funding.

While the program is referred to as the Bar & Restaurant Assistance Fund, more than just bars and restaurants have eligible permits. Movie theaters, bowling alleys, sports and concert venues, and even some hair salons are eligible for this funding.

Eligible businesses can visit businesshelp.ohio.gov to apply, which requires them to simply enter their liquor permit number and federal tax information.

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION RATE CUT

The Lt. Governor also announced that Ohio’s public employers will pay $14.8 million less in premiums this year thanks to a rate reduction from the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation that went into effect January 1.

The rate cut means approximately 3,700 counties, cities, public schools, and other public taxing districts will pay an average of 10 percent less on their annual premiums than in calendar year 2020. The reduction, made possible by declining injury trends and relatively low medical inflation costs, is the twelfth cut for public employers since 2009 and follows a 10 percent cut in 2020.

Update December 31, 2020 2:15 PM

Health Order Signed Encouraging Ohioans to Stay Home

Governor Mike DeWine today announced that Ohio Department of Health Director Stephanie McCloud signed a health order encouraging people to stay at home during specified hours unless they are working or engaged in an essential activity. This extends provisions in previous orders and applies until January 23, 2021, at 12:01 p.m.

Specifications in this order include:

  • Individuals within the state must stay at a place of residence during the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. except for obtaining necessary food, medical care, or social services or providing care for others.
    • This order doesn’t apply to those that are homeless. Individuals whose residences are unsafe or become unsafe, such as victims of domestic violence, are encouraged to leave their homes and stay at a safe, alternative location.
    • The order does not apply to religious observances and First Amendment protected speech including activity by the media.
  • The order permits travel into or out of the state and permits travel required by law enforcement or court order, including to transport children according to a custody agreement, or to obtain fuel.

Individuals are permitted to leave a place of residence during the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. for the following essential activities:

  • Engaging in activities essential to their health and safety or the health and safety of those in their households or people who are unable to or should not leave their homes, including pets. Activities can include but are not limited to seeking emergency services, obtaining medical supplies or medication, or visiting a health care professional including hospitals, emergency departments, urgent care clinics, and pharmacies.
  • To obtain necessary services or supplies for themselves and their family or members of their household who are unable or should not leave their home, to deliver those services or supplies to others. Examples of those include but are not limited to, obtaining groceries and food. Food and beverages may be obtained only for consumption off-premises, through such means as delivery, drive-through, curbside pickup and carryout.
  • To obtain necessary social services.
  • To go to work, including volunteer work.
  • To take care of or transport a family member, friend, or pet in their household or another household.
  • To perform or obtain government services.

Update December 30, 2020 4:45 PM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

OHIO VACCINES

Ohio is expected to receive more than 238,000 doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines next week. Governor DeWine encouraged those administering the vaccine to do so with urgency.

“Although we’ll never know whose lives have been saved, we do know that these vaccines are saving lives,” said Governor DeWine. “We all have a moral responsibility to get the vaccine out to those who choose to receive it as quickly as we possibly can.”

Governor DeWine also encouraged citizens who wish to be vaccinated to act with urgency when offered the vaccine. Because the vaccine is currently scarce, Governor DeWine warned that those who decline to receive a vaccine at the first opportunity may not immediately receive another chance.

SCHOOL QUARANTINE GUIDANCE CHANGE

Governor DeWine announced that Ohio is changing its guidance regarding quarantines following an in-classroom exposure in K-12 schools. Moving forward, students and teachers exposed to a COVID-positive person in school are no longer required to quarantine as long as the exposure occurred in a classroom setting and all students/teachers were wearing masks and following other appropriate protocols.

The change follows an evaluation of virus spread in Ohio schools conducted by researchers with the Ohio Schools COVID-19 Evaluation Team. Preliminary results of the evaluation found no discernable difference in the risk of contracting the coronavirus between those in close contact with a COVID-positive person in the classroom and those who were farther away.

“This evaluation confirms for us that Ohio’s classrooms are a safe place for our students and that the commitment our schools have made to keeping kids safe in the classroom is working,” said Governor DeWine.

Schools should continue to require quarantines for exposed students in situations where masking and distancing protocols were not followed. The updated quarantine guidance does not apply to after-school activities, including sports.

CURFEW EXTENSION

Governor DeWine announced that the Ohio Department of Health will extend Ohio’s 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew until January 23, 2021. The extension is necessary until Ohio can determine if it will see a post-holiday case surge that impacts hospitals.

The curfew does not apply to those going to and from work, those who have an emergency, or those who need medical care. The curfew is not intended to stop anyone from getting groceries or going to the pharmacy.  Picking up carry-out or a drive-thru meal and ordering for delivery is permitted, but serving food and drink within an establishment must cease at 10:00 p.m.

BAR & RESTAURANT GRANTS STILL AVAILABLE

More than 5,100 eligible on-premises liquor permit holders have not yet applied for state assistance through Ohio’s Bar & Restaurant Grant Program. Of the $38.7 million allotted to support liquor permit holders, more than $12 million remains unclaimed.

Each active on-premises liquor permit (as of 10.23.20) is eligible for $2,500 per location. The funding is not competitive, and the money does not have to be repaid.

Although the program is referred to as the Bar & Restaurant Assistance Fund, more than just bars and restaurants have eligible liquor permits.  Movie theaters, bowling alleys, sports and concert venues, and even some hair salons are eligible for this funding.

Permit holders who have not yet claimed their funds should visit businesshelp.ohio.gov to apply.

Update December 30, 2020 3:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 47,027 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

COVID-19 Cases in Cuyahoga County Map

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 1651-2648.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update December 23, 2020 5:30 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

NEXT VACCINATION PHASE

Governor DeWine announced the goals of Phase 1B of COVID-19 vaccine distribution are to save lives and for schools to be fully open by March 1st.

“Ohioans in the 65 and older category make up just under 87% of COVID deaths. This is a stunning number, and it’s critical that we protect our older Ohioans,” said Governor DeWine.

In the next phase, vaccines will be available to those who choose to receive them who are 65 years or older or those living with severe congenital, developmental, or early-onset medical disorders. Additionally, adults working in Ohio’s schools will have the option to receive the vaccine. This is intended to assist schools in returning to in-person learning.

Additional details about the next phase are forthcoming.

The following Phase 1A members are currently receiving the COVID-19 vaccine.  This phase includes health care workers and personnel, nursing homes residents and staff, assisted living facilities residents and staff, psychiatric hospital patients and staff, people with developmental disabilities and those with mental illness who live in group homes or centers and staff at those locations, Ohio veterans homes residents and staff, and EMS responders.

LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENTS AND HOSPITALS

The local health departments and hospitals will assist with managing mass vaccination clinics as more vaccines are shipped to Ohio.

“Ohio’s public health departments and hospitals are experts at managing mass vaccination clinics, and I am thankful we can turn to them to begin vaccinating Ohioans against COVID-19,” said Governor DeWine.

Christina Conover, director of nursing for the Clark County Combined Health District, joined today’s public briefing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine and encouraged other first responders and health care workers to do the same.

Dr. Kevin Miller, emergency department physician, chief of Sugarcreek Fire Department and Tuscarawas County EMS director, and Dr. Jeffrey Cameron, Tuscarawas County coroner and emergency room doctor, both received their COVID-19 vaccine at the public briefing. Both doctors discussed their experiences in the emergency room throughout the pandemic and why they chose to receive the vaccine.

Additionally, advanced EMTs and paramedics will assist in administering the COVID-19 vaccine.

Dr. Carol Cunningham, an emergency room physician and Ohio’s State Medical Director for Emergency Medical Services, received a COVID-19 vaccine administered by Dan Samf, a paramedic with the Kirtland Fire Department.

Also Charles Shepherd, a therapeutic program worker at Twin Valley Psychiatric Hospital, joined today’s public briefing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine and discussed the impact the vaccine will have at state psychiatric hospitals. .

NEW COVID-19 MAPS

Governor DeWine shared two new maps from the Ohio Department of Health for tracking how severe the spread of COVID-19 is in Ohio.

The first map measures cases per capita over time. The time-lapse map is based on the list of high incidence counties and indicates the levels of spread from week to week.

Incidence Cases Per 100,000 Map

The second map shows each Hospital Preparedness Region and what percent of the overall ICU patient population are COVID patients.

“At the beginning of August, we were at about 12% statewide, or 1 in 8 patients in the ICU was a COVID patient,” said Governor DeWine. “Now, we’re at 31% or about 1 in 3 patients in the ICU are a COVID patient.”

Regional COVID-19 UCU Utilization Map

Both maps will be updated weekly on Thursdays at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

BWC “WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED” 

Lt. Governor Husted today announced that the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) is distributing another 23 million Ohio-made masks to help support the state’s workforce.  Shipments began in November and are expected to continue through June 2021. In October, the BWC contracted with Buckeye Mask Company, in Cleveland, for 10 million masks, and with Career Development and Placement Strategies, also in Cleveland, for 13 million masks.

Today’s announcement marks the second round of mask distribution launched by the BWC, which sent out nearly 23 million masks over the summer and fall to assist in weakening the spread of COVID-19.

SUPPORT LOCAL THIS HOLIDAY SEASON

With Christmas days away, Lt. Governor Husted reminded Ohioans to consider “shopping local” this holiday season to help Ohio retailers and small businesses. In addition, to support local restaurants, many Ohio food establishments offer delivery and take-out options.

For ideas on how to support local, visit Ohio.org.

FOODBANKS

First Lady Fran DeWine encouraged Ohioans to consider donating to The Ohio Association of Foodbanks, which serves all 88 counties.

More information about how to donate can be found at OhioFoodbanks.org/Coronavirus.

CHILD CARE STUDY

Since reopening child care at the end of May, Ohio has participated in two significant research studies on the spread of COVID in child care settings. The results of both studies found that child care did not lead to an increased risk for contracting COVID.

In October, Yale University released their findings from a survey of nearly 100,000 child care educators across the nation, including more than 5,000 in Ohio. This study found the work of child care providers to sanitize, wash hands, stay masked, and social distance greatly impacted the safety of children in their care.

The Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation also commissioned a study of Ohio child care facilities through Case Western Reserve University. The results of this study will be released soon, confirming the findings of the Yale study.

Through parent and child care worker surveys and interviews; symptom tracking of workers, children, and parents; and hundreds of COVID tests of child care workers and families from August to November, researchers from Case Western found no link between child care and an increased risk of contracting COVID-19. In fact, just 2 asymptomatic positives were found among the nearly 400 COVID tests, which is a positivity rate of just 0.5 percent.

“I want to thank all of our child care workers for their efforts over the past nine months, said Governor DeWine. “You all have truly risen to the occasion to protect the children and families you serve, and just as importantly, yourselves.”

Update December 23, 2020 3:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 43,333 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

COVID-19 Cases in Cuyahoga County Map

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 1532-2450.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update December 21, 2020 3:45 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

OHIO EXCEEDS 8,000 DEATHS

On Saturday, Ohio surpassed 8,000 confirmed and probable COVID-19 deaths. As of today, 8,122 people infected with the coronavirus have died since the beginning of the pandemic.

In the past 24 hours, 6,548 new cases and 301 new hospitalizations were reported. A total of 17 counties have a case rate over 1,000, meaning that at least 1 percent of people in these counties either have or recently had the virus and are at risk of spreading it to others.

THANKSGIVING MOBILITY & UPCOMING HOLIDAYS

Ohio is not experiencing a drastic surge in cases related to Thanksgiving gatherings which is attributable to the fact that Ohioans greatly reduced their contacts and travel over the holiday. According to anonymized data published in the New York Timesthere was a 60 to 70 percent reduction in contacts over the Thanksgiving holiday.

“If we can get through Christmas and New Year’s without a significant surge, we will be much better positioned to start 2021 against this virus,” said Governor DeWine. “It’s critical that we keep up the work we started over Thanksgiving for the next several weeks to prevent another surge in January.”

Ohio Department of Health Chief Medical Officer Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff stressed the need for citizens to continue following the Stay Safe Ohio Protocol to help prevent Ohio hospitals from becoming overwhelmed.

“Up to and through Thanksgiving, Ohioans took important steps to avoid letting COVID-19 overwhelm our hospitals, but in spite of this, our hospitals remain extremely busy,” said Dr. Vanderhoff. “Adding a post-holiday spike would create a terrible situation, so we can’t let ourselves be lulled into a sense of complacency as we move into the next two-week period, the biggest holiday season on our calendar.”

OHIO NATIONAL GUARD WAIVER

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced that the Ohio National Guard received a waiver that will allow them to help administer the COVID-19 vaccine. The waiver gives the Ohio National Guard the flexibility to fully utilize National Guard medical personnel trained in administering the vaccine.

The Ohio National Guard has approximately 600 members who are medical personnel, including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, and medics. Ohio is working to determine how it will best utilize Guard medical personnel without adversely affecting Ohio health care systems’ critical medical resources by removing Guard members from their civilian medical positions.

PHONE NUMBERS

Governor DeWine reminded doctors and others performing COVID-19 testing to collect complete information from patients including telephone numbers. This is vital information for local health departments conducting case investigations and contact tracing.

IMAP

Lt. Governor Husted reminded Ohioans about the Individual Microcredential Assistance Program, or IMAP, which is a program available to Ohioans who are low income, partially unemployed, or totally unemployed to earn a tech-focused credential for free. There are 11 IMAP training providers and 54 eligible credentials available, and 37 of these credentials can be completed 100 percent online. Those interested should visit IMAP.Development.Ohio.gov to apply.

Update December 18, 2020 3:45 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 39,198 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

Map of COVID-19 Cases in Cuyahoga County

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 1402-2220.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update December 17, 2020 3:45 PM

Governor Mike DeWine today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

OHIO PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORY SYSTEM

New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health shows sustained severe exposure and spread (Purple Level 4) in Richland County. Medina, Portage, Stark, and Summit counties all moved from Purple Level 4 to Red Level 3 this week. Governor DeWine cautioned that a decrease from Level 4 to Level 3 does not indicate that the situation in these counties is improving, but rather that healthcare indicators, such as hospitalizations, are plateauing at a very critical level.

“Red and purple are not all that different,” said Governor DeWine. “They both mean that a county has a very high level of cases and a very high level of COVID activity in the healthcare system. Purple simply indicates counties where things are worsening noticeably, but red counties are also at very worrisome and unsustainable levels.”

When seeking to determine the level of risk in each county, Governor DeWine encouraged Ohioans to look more closely at the chart below which shows the number of positive cases per 1,000 residents. All 88 counties have a level of spread that is at least three times more than what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers high incidence. The top 20 counties show rates of nine to 13 times the high-incidence level.

Chart of Ohio Counties Ranked by COVID-Cases

VACCINE UPDATE

Tomorrow, as part of the federal program to vaccinate nursing home residents and staff, facilities in Ohio will be among the first in the nation to receive vaccines through Walgreen’s, CVS, PharmScript, and Absolute Pharmacy. Ohio was invited by the CDC to participate in the scaling up of the federal program.

NEW PSA FEATURING OHIO NURSES

Governor DeWine unveiled a new public service announcement featuring four of Ohio’s frontline nurses. The nurses describe what it’s like taking care of COVID patients in Ohio’s hospitals.

The featured nurses are Erin Russo of Memorial Hospital in Marysville, Dara Pence of OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, Jasmine Shavers of Miami Valley Hospital, and Lisa Burich of St. Elizabeth Youngstown Hospital.

Update December 15, 2020 4:30 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

VACCINATIONS CONTINUE IN OHIO

Seven hospitals in Ohio received their first vaccine shipments today, bringing the total number of vaccine doses delivered to Ohio over the past two days to 98,475.

Governor and First Lady DeWine were present this morning for the delivery of the vaccine shipment to Mercy Health Springfield Regional Medical Center and Lt. Governor Jon Husted visited OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital in Columbus as they received their first delivery of COVID-19 vaccines.

In addition to the two aforementioned hospitals, COVID-19 vaccine shipments of 975 doses apiece were also delivered to:

  • Mercy Health St. Vincent Hospital, Lucas County
  • Cleveland Clinic, Cuyahoga County
  • Metro Health Medical Center, Cuyahoga County
  • Aultman Hospital, Stark County
  • Genesis Hospital, Muskingum County

An additional 975-dose shipment was delivered today to OhioHealth Riverside Hospital for use at OhioHealth O’Bleness Hospital in Athens.

Although vaccine supplies are currently limited, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has advised that Ohio will continue to receive vaccinations throughout the month of December. Next week, Ohio is expected to receive 123,000 doses of the Pfizer vaccine, as well as 201,900 doses of the Moderna vaccine. During the week of New Year’s, Ohio is expected to receive an additional 148,000 Pfizer vaccines and an additional 89,000 doses of the Moderna vaccine.

A number of healthcare workers who received vaccinations today joined today’s public briefing to discuss their experiences, including Kasi Gardner, RN, of Mercy Health Springfield Regional Medical Center who received her vaccine during the news conference.

Dr. Jennifer Wall Forrester, associate chief medical officer at UC Health, also discussed when citizens should call their doctors or go to the hospital if they develop COVID-19 symptoms.

HOSPITALIZATIONS 

Ohioans continue to be hospitalized at record numbers. As of today, 5,296 patients are hospitalized throughout the state and 1,311 of those patients are in intensive care units. Ohio currently has more patients in the ICU than it had total for all COVID-19 hospitalized patients during the previous peak last summer.  There are currently 863 patients who need a ventilator, as compared to 360 patients on ventilators a month ago.

“While there is good reason to be optimistic about Ohioans receiving the vaccine, we have our work cut out for us to slow the spread of the virus until enough Ohioans can be vaccinated,” said Governor DeWine. “We must continue rallying together to prevent overwhelming our hospitals.”

LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENT VACCINATION GUIDANCE

Next week, local health departments in Ohio that registered as providers are expected to begin receiving vaccines.  Today, Governor DeWine outlined guidance on individuals who should be prioritized by health departments during Phase 1A.

Local health departments should coordinate the vaccinations of congregate care residents and staff, such as those at nursing homes and assisted living facilities, who are not enrolled in the federal long-term care pharmacy programs or are not registered as providers themselves. This includes people with developmental disabilities and those with mental health disorders, including substance use disorders, who live in group homes, residential facilities, or centers, as well as staff.

In addition, local health departments should prioritize vaccinating other healthcare providers who are not being vaccinated by hospitals and health systems and are not enrolled as providers themselves.  These providers could include:

  • Home health workers
  • Hospice workers
  • Emergency medical services responders
  • Primary care practitioners
  • Free-standing emergency department, urgent care, pharmacy, and dialysis center providers not vaccinated by hospitals or healthcare systems
  • Dental providers
  • Public health employees who are at risk of exposure or transmission, such as vaccinators
  • Mobile unit practitioners
  • Federally-qualified health center providers
  • High-risk ancillary health care staff members

Update December 14, 2020 4:30 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

VACCINATIONS BEGIN IN OHIO

Governor DeWine announced today that the first COVID-19 vaccinations have been administered in Ohio. Shipments of 975 doses were delivered this morning to both The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus and UC Health in Cincinnati. Several healthcare workers and personnel who are routinely involved with the care of COVID-19 patients immediately received vaccinations.

“It was such a moment of hope to watch the healthcare workers begin to get vaccinated today,” said Governor DeWine. “Today is the first day of a process that will continue over the months ahead as Ohioans who choose to be vaccinated have their opportunity to receive the vaccine. However, until the vaccine is widely available for all Ohioans who choose to receive it, we must continue to use all available tools to prevent the spread of the virus, like wearing a mask, keeping your distance, and washing your hands.”

Vaccine shipments will be delivered to eight additional hospitals in Ohio tomorrow:

  • Mercy Health St. Vincent Hospital, Lucas County
  • Cleveland Clinic, Cuyahoga County
  • Metro Health Medical Center, Cuyahoga County
  • Mercy Health Springfield Regional Medical Center, Clark County
  • OhioHealth Riverside Hospital, Franklin County
  • Aultman Hospital, Stark County
  • OhioHealth O’Bleness Hospital, Athens County
  • Genesis Hospital, Muskingum County

All 10 hospitals were selected based on geography, population, and access to ultra-cold storage capacity.

As COVID-19 vaccines continue to come to Ohio, Cardinal Health’s OptiFreight Logistics business will help provide same-day delivery services. Once the vaccine is widely available, this partnership will allow Ohio to ship the vaccine to approximately 350 locations across the state.

NURSING HOME VACCINATIONS

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has invited Ohio to participate in an early scaled launch of vaccinations in nursing homes. Ohio will begin providing vaccinations in five to ten nursing homes starting this Friday, December 18.

Ohio had previously been scheduled to start its nursing home vaccination program in partnership with pharmacy providers on Monday, December 21.

VACCINATION DASHBOARD

Governor DeWine announced that Ohio will launch a new COVID-19 Vaccination Dashboard in the coming days at coronavirus.ohio.gov. The dashboard will list the number of people vaccinated in Ohio and will be sortable by demographic and by county.

Update December 11, 2020 3:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 32,637 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 1201-1860.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update December 10, 2020 6:00 PM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

STAY SAFE OHIO PROTOCOL

Governor DeWine today unveiled the new Stay Safe Ohio Protocol. The protocol was developed in partnership with medical professionals across the state to inform Ohioans how to safely live with the virus.

Stay Safe Ohio Protocol Graphic

Governor DeWine was joined by medical professionals throughout the state to explain the importance of the protocols.

CURFEW EXTENSION

Governor DeWine announced today that the Ohio Department of Health will be extending the 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. statewide curfew until January 2, 2021.

The curfew does not apply to those going to and from work, those who have an emergency, or those who need medical care. The curfew is not intended to stop anyone from getting groceries or going to the pharmacy.  Picking up carry-out or a drive-thru meal and ordering for delivery will be permitted, but serving food and drink within an establishment must cease at 10 p.m.

“COVID-19 is the single greatest threat to the physical well-being of all Ohioans, the mental health of our citizens, and our economic security,” said Governor DeWine. “We must do everything we can to slow down the spread of this virus.”

The decision to extend the curfew was made with input from the medical and business communities with consideration to the economic impact and health care system.

The extended order can be found at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

OHIO PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORY SYSTEM

New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) showed sustained severe exposure and spread (Purple Level 4) in Medina, Portage, Richland, Stark and Summit counties. Ashland and Guernsey counties were moved to the Watch List.

Noble, Harrison and Washington counties moved to Red Level 3 for the first time since implementation of the Advisory System in April.

Ohio also had 11,738 new cases reported between yesterday and today, which is the fourth highest case court to date. A total of 452 new hospitalizations were reported, as well as 111 deaths.

Ohio Public Health Advisory System Map

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

SPORTS VARIANCE

The Ohio Department of Health will issue a variance to the curfew for specific sporting events in Ohio. The start times of these games are dictated by national television contracts, and as a result, the games would not be finished until after the 10 p.m. curfew.

More information will be available at coronavirus.ohio.gov in the coming days.

DINE SAFE

Lt. Governor Husted encouraged Ohioans to do what they can to support local restaurants during this time, whether it’s by carrying out a meal at least once a week or by ordering delivery. He also recommended giving out restaurant gift cards as gifts for family and friends this holiday season.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

As another update in Ohio’s economic recovery, the Lt. Governor discussed two new projects that are putting Ohio on the map as far as innovation in transportation technology.

Agility Prime: Earlier today, the Lt. Governor joined officials from the Air Force Research Laboratory, Dayton Development Coalition, JobsOhio, City of Springfield, BETA Technologies, and Joby Aviation to participate in a virtual groundbreaking event for a new advanced urban air mobility technology simulator facility at the Springfield-Beckley Municipal Airport.

The Air Force recently launched the program, which seeks to accelerate the commercial market for advanced air mobility aircraft and create a robust domestic industry and supply chain to support their development and production.

Waymo: Last week, Waymo – one of the world leaders in autonomous driving technology – announced their plan to develop new proprietary features at TRC’s SMARTCenter to help them advance their Waymo Driver self-driving system and driverless Class 8 truck. This is a big win for Ohio as it’s the first time Waymo has established a permanent presence at a third-party test site.

The Lt. Governor underscored what these announcements mean to Ohio’s recovery and how they attract investment, new technologies and workforce development.

“This can really be an important part of the foundation for our economic recovery in 2021,” Lt. Gov. Husted said. “We really welcome these new investments from companies who are outside of Ohio – who are bringing their investments to Ohio – to start brand new innovations, brand new companies and brand new technologies that we hope will benefit Ohioans for generations to come.”

Update December 7, 2020 5:00 PM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

OHIO CASES AND HOSPITALIZATIONS

In the past 24 hours, Ohio reported 9,273 new coronavirus cases, the sixth highest count reported in one day since the pandemic. 336 new hospitalizations were reported and 40 new patients are in intensive care. An additional 63 people have died from COVID-19 in Ohio, surpassing 7,000 total deaths since the beginning of the pandemic.

ANTIGEN TESTING UPDATE

Governor DeWine discussed the Ohio Department of Health aligning with the Center of Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) current case definition. In August, the CDC changed the case definition of antigen testing to include case counts without additional verification.  Ohio has continued to manually verify an epidemiological link, such as a known positive contact, with an antigen positive test result.

Tomorrow, December 8, the department will begin including antigen tests without an epidemiological link in the total case count. This will result in a one-day spike in reported cases from pending positive antigen cases.

“After understanding more about the antigen testing, the CDC changed their definition. Our epidemiologists have alerted us that they are no longer able to keep up with the manual verification process of antigen testing because there is so much COVID-19 spread in Ohio,” said Governor DeWine. “Antigen tests have become a bigger part of our overall picture of understanding COVID-19, and it’s important to capture that information.”

Not all pending cases will be translated into new cases.  Cases will be checked and duplicate records will be removed. Cases will also be assigned to their appropriate onset date.

K-12 EDUCATION UPDATE

The Ohio Department of Education continues to report limited spread of COVID-19 in a classroom setting, but an increase of community spread from informal gatherings outside of school.

The department also tracks how many districts are hosting in-person, hybrid, or remote learning.

“This week, you can see that a lot of districts, especially in northeast Ohio, are fully remote.  Once we get community spread under control, schools will feel safe going back to in-person learning,” said Governor DeWine.

DATAOHIO PORTAL

Lt. Governor Husted announced the launch of the DataOhio Portal, which delivers datasets and interactive visualizations to Ohioans.  This portal delivers unprecedented access through an innovative, data-sharing platform for state agencies and their partners.

We’ve all learned over the past year how critical data is to tackling our biggest challenges,” said Lt. Governor Husted. “The IOP team has built a one-stop-shop for the state’s data, providing a secure approach to data access and displaying datasets that, in some cases, are available now for the first time. This collaboration will help Ohio make better public policy decisions so we can better serve the people of our state.”

ADDITIONAL GUESTS

During today’s briefing, Governor DeWine was joined by two nurses who discussed their experiences treating patients with coronavirus.

Lisa Burich, a registered nurse and emergency room team lead at Mercy Health St. Elizabeth Youngstown Hospital, discussed the conditions seen for admitted coronavirus patients and the concern of spreading COVID-19 from the hospital setting.

CJ Adams, nurse manager at TriHealth Bethesda North Hospital, discussed the challenges associated with bed and staffing capacities. Adams was a Captain in the Air Force Reserves and shared how her military experience has helped build her leadership and resiliency skills.

Update December 4, 2020 4:30 PM

Governor Mike DeWine today announced details for Ohio’s first phase of vaccine distribution that is expected to begin on or around December 15.

During Phase 1, vaccine supply will be limited, and Ohio will focus on vaccinating those who wish to be vaccinated in the critical Phase 1A groups outlined below.

Ohio's Vaccination Program Graphic

The federal government has advised that the Ohio Department of Health will not know the exact number of vaccines that will be shipped to Ohio until closer to each shipment date. The current shipment figures, which are subject to change, are as follows:

  • On or around December 15, a shipment from Pfizer will include 9,750 vaccines for Ohio’s prepositioned hospital sites. An additional 88,725 vaccines will go to Walgreens and CVS for congregate care settings.
  • On or around December 22, a shipment of 201,000 vaccines is expected from Moderna. These vaccines will go to 98 hospitals for vaccination of those who are exposed to COVID patients and to 108 health departments to vaccinate other frontline workers such as those working in emergency medical services.
  • On or around December 22, another shipment is also expected from Pfizer. The tentative number of vaccines in this shipment is 123,000. These vaccines will go to Walgreens and CVS for vaccination of those in congregate care settings.
  • A few days later, Ohio expects another 148,000 vaccines from Pfizer and 89,000 vaccines from Moderna.

These vaccines will be the first dose for those in the identified critical groups. A second dose will be delivered and administered in the future. It has not been determined when members of the general public will have the option to receive vaccines. As information becomes available about the next phases of vaccine distribution, it will be made public.

QUARANTINE GUIDANCE

Ohio Department of Health Chief Medical Officer Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff today discussed new quarantine guidance recently issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for those who may have been exposed to coronavirus but are not showing symptoms.

Following the study of emerging data and a growing confidence in testing, CDC’s new guidance has two options depending on the situation:

  • 10-day quarantine that does not require testing, provided there are no symptoms
  • 7-day quarantine if test results are negative, provided there are no symptoms

The Ohio Department of Health, however, continues to recommend a 14-day quarantine for many citizens in Ohio.

“Staying home for 14 days after contact is still the safest way to limit possible spread of COVID-19,” said Dr. Vanderhoff. “We continue to recommend this time period for people in congregate living facilities, such as nursing homes; in workplaces with a large number of employees; and in other settings in which COVID-19 could spread extensively. We also recommend 14 days if you are in contact with people at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.”

For others with no symptoms, the 10-day period may be sufficient, however, Dr. Vanderhoff recommends that Ohioans consider getting tested on day eight or later to increase certainty of no infection. Quarantine can then end at the conclusion of the 10-day period.

Quarantine can be reduced further to seven days, Dr. Vanderhoff said, if an individual has no symptoms and receives a negative test on day five or later.

“In every case — whether quarantining for 14 days, or 10, or seven — maintain social distance of at least 6 feet and wear a mask when around others,” he said. “You should also keep an eye out for any symptoms for the full 14-day period. If you become sick or test positive for COVID-19, stay home and self-isolate in a separate room from others.”

Update December 4, 2020 3:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 28,450 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

Map of Cuyahoga County COVID-19 Cases By County

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 1063-1627.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update December 3, 2020 5:00 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

OHIO CASES AND HOSPITALIZATIONS 

In the past 24 hours, Ohio reported 8,921 new coronavirus cases, the fifth-highest case count reported in one day since the start of the pandemic. Nearly 400 more hospitalizations were reported, and an additional 82 people have died from COVID-19 in Ohio.

COVID-19 hospitalizations remain high with 5,142 patients currently hospitalized. Of those, 1,204 patients are in intensive care.

Dr. Andy Thomas, chief clinical officer at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, warned that Ohio is not yet seeing the impact of gatherings that took place over Thanksgiving because hospitalizations are a lagging indicator. Symptoms generally develop within 10 days of transmission, and hospitalizations typically occur a week after diagnosis.

“This is not the beginning of the end or even the end of the beginning,” said Dr. Thomas. “Hospitals are in a very difficult spot here, and we’re just now heading into the most challenging three months of the pandemic. ICU beds are an area of capacity where we have the biggest strain across the state, especially in rural areas.”

“We are in crisis. Hospitals across Ohio are running out of beds, healthcare workers are burned out and stretched thin, and our hospitals are stressed to the extreme,” said Dr. Nora Colburn, associate medical director for clinical epidemiology at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. “Hospitals around the state are delaying non-emergency procedures which will impact routine healthcare. The bottom line is that non-COVID patients are being crowded out of the system and won’t be able to get the care they need to stay healthy. We all must do our part to stop the spread of the virus.”

OHIO PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORY SYSTEM

New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) showed sustained severe exposure and spread (Purple Level 4) in Lake, Lorain, Medina, Montgomery, Portage, Richland, Stark, and Summit counties. Cuyahoga, Fairfield, and Madison counties were moved to the Watch List.

Franklin County dropped from Purple Level 4 to Red Level 3, however, Dr. Thomas urged county residents to remain vigilant.

“This does not mean that Franklin County is out of the woods,” said Dr. Thomas. “We still have a rate of cases that is six-times higher than the definition of high incidence. That is not good. We are not on our way down yet.”

Ohio Public Health Advisory System Map

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

OHIO POSITIVITY

According to this week’s ODH travel advisory, this is the first week since April where Ohio’s positivity for COVID-19 has increased above 15 percent.

The travel advisory encourages all Ohioans to help to limit the spread and impact of this virus by staying home except for necessary trips for supplies. The advisory also urges Ohioans to consistently wear masks when around others and frequently wash their hands.

ODH requests that anyone who must travel to any other state with a positivity rate of 15 percent or more self-quarantine for 14 days upon return. ODH also asks any non-Ohioans entering the state from one of these areas to do the same.

RETAIL COMPLIANCE UNIT DASHBOARD

Governor DeWine announced that Ohio’s Retail Compliance Unit Dashboard is now available online at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

The new dashboard includes information on the number of retailers visited by agents, how many customers and employees were properly wearing masks, how many establishments had proper signage, and the number of warnings issued. The dashboard will be updated each Thursday.

The Retail Compliance Unit was created within the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation to help keep businesses open and safe for customers and employees.

MASKS AND THOSE WITH DISABILITIES

On International Day of Persons with Disabilities, Governor DeWine reminded Ohioans that some individuals with disabilities may not be able to wear a mask.

“While it’s crucial that those of us who can wear face masks do wear face masks, we should all remember that when we see someone in public without a mask it may be someone with a disability who may not be able to wear one,” said Governor DeWine.

Update December 3, 2020 1:30 PM

Cuyahoga County Launches Extension of Small Business Stabilization Fund to Support Restaurants Impacted by COVID-19
$1.2 Million Available in Grants for Restaurants 

Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish announced today an extension of funding under the County’s Small Business Stabilization Fund created to support restaurants impacted by the pandemic. An additional $1.2 million has been identified and designated from the County’s Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) Funding for grants of up to $10,000 each to restaurants in Cuyahoga County for unpaid rent, utilities, and COVID-19 safety-related costs incurred from March 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020.

“Our locally owned restaurants are a key part of our community and our culture. Many of them have experienced terrible losses or closed forever because of the virus,” said Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish. “Several restaurants that have applied for and received funding earlier on in the pandemic have exhausted their funding assistance. We are providing an additional $1.2 million in grant funding to help our restaurants catch up on unpaid rent and utilities and any COVID safety-related costs they’ve incurred.”

Grants will be administered by Destination Cleveland and distributed by Cleveland Neighborhood Progress.

Destination Cleveland is incredibly appreciative of Cuyahoga County’s continued efforts to help preserve the Cleveland experience for residents and visitors alike,” said David Gilbert, President and CEO of Destination Cleveland. “Our locally owned restaurants play such an important role in illustrating our ethnic diversity, history and creativity and help define what makes Cleveland a destination city. We are proud to partner with the County and Cleveland Neighborhood Progress to offer this much-needed relief to our restaurant community.”

Cleveland Neighborhood Progress congratulates the County’s efforts to support the restaurant community through this dedicated source of funding,” stated President and CEO of Cleveland Neighborhood Progress Tania Menesse. “We are honored to partner with Destination Cleveland in support of the County’s Restaurant Stabilization Fund. Our restaurants are essential to the fabric of our neighborhoods and continue to face financial hardship as a result of COVID-19. Therefore, we remain as committed as ever to a quick and efficient distribution of this critical funding for restaurants during this challenging time.”

Cuyahoga County Restaurant Stabilization Fund grants will not be available for any costs already covered by any federal, state, or local grant or loan program.

Restaurants that have already applied for a grant through Round 3 of the County’s Small Business Stabilization Fund (for which applications just closed) may still apply for this restaurant extension. Businesses will only receive grants from one of the two programs.

The application for restaurant stabilization grants will be open Friday, December 4, 2020, at 2:30 p.m. and close Friday, December 11 at 5:00 p.m. Grants will be awarded and distributed shortly after. Restaurants can apply for a grant by completing the Restaurant Stabilization Fund Application at cuyahogacounty.us/restauranthelp. Questions about the grant program can be directed to 216-875-6685 or helpforbusiness@destinationcle.org.

Restaurants that are eligible for a grant will be contacted for further information and must submit the requested documentation within 48 hours of the supplemental information request.

Update December 3, 2020 5:00 PM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

OHIO CASES AND HOSPITALIZATIONS 

In the past 24 hours, Ohio reported 8,921 new coronavirus cases, the fifth-highest case count reported in one day since the start of the pandemic. Nearly 400 more hospitalizations were reported, and an additional 82 people have died from COVID-19 in Ohio.

COVID-19 hospitalizations remain high with 5,142 patients currently hospitalized. Of those, 1,204 patients are in intensive care.

Dr. Andy Thomas, chief clinical officer at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, warned that Ohio is not yet seeing the impact of gatherings that took place over Thanksgiving because hospitalizations are a lagging indicator. Symptoms generally develop within 10 days of transmission, and hospitalizations typically occur a week after diagnosis.

“This is not the beginning of the end or even the end of the beginning,” said Dr. Thomas. “Hospitals are in a very difficult spot here, and we’re just now heading into the most challenging three months of the pandemic. ICU beds are an area of capacity where we have the biggest strain across the state, especially in rural areas.”

“We are in crisis. Hospitals across Ohio are running out of beds, healthcare workers are burned out and stretched thin, and our hospitals are stressed to the extreme,” said Dr. Nora Colburn, associate medical director for clinical epidemiology at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. “Hospitals around the state are delaying non-emergency procedures which will impact routine healthcare. The bottom line is that non-COVID patients are being crowded out of the system and won’t be able to get the care they need to stay healthy. We all must do our part to stop the spread of the virus.”

OHIO PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORY SYSTEM

New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) showed sustained severe exposure and spread (Purple Level 4) in Lake, Lorain, Medina, Montgomery, Portage, Richland, Stark, and Summit counties. Cuyahoga, Fairfield, and Madison counties were moved to the Watch List.

Franklin County dropped from Purple Level 4 to Red Level 3, however, Dr. Thomas urged county residents to remain vigilant.

“This does not mean that Franklin County is out of the woods,” said Dr. Thomas. “We still have a rate of cases that is six-times higher than the definition of high incidence. That is not good. We are not on our way down yet.”

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

OHIO POSITIVITY

According to this week’s ODH travel advisory, this is the first week since April where Ohio’s positivity for COVID-19 has increased above 15 percent.

The travel advisory encourages all Ohioans to help to limit the spread and impact of this virus by staying home except for necessary trips for supplies. The advisory also urges Ohioans to consistently wear masks when around others and frequently wash their hands.

ODH requests that anyone who must travel to any other state with a positivity rate of 15 percent or more self-quarantine for 14 days upon return. ODH also asks any non-Ohioans entering the state from one of these areas to do the same.

RETAIL COMPLIANCE UNIT DASHBOARD

Governor DeWine announced that Ohio’s Retail Compliance Unit Dashboard is now available online at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

The new dashboard includes information on the number of retailers visited by agents, how many customers and employees were properly wearing masks, how many establishments had proper signage, and the number of warnings issued. The dashboard will be updated each Thursday.

The Retail Compliance Unit was created within the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation to help keep businesses open and safe for customers and employees.

MASKS AND THOSE WITH DISABILITIES

On International Day of Persons with Disabilities, Governor DeWine reminded Ohioans that some individuals with disabilities may not be able to wear a mask.

“While it’s crucial that those of us who can wear face masks do wear face masks, we should all remember that when we see someone in public without a mask it may be someone with a disability who may not be able to wear one,” said Governor DeWine.

Update December 3, 2020 4:00 PM

Citing objections from health care professionals and business leaders as being detrimental to pandemic response and public health, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine today vetoed Substitute Senate Bill 311, stating in his veto message that “it is not in the best interest of protecting the health and safety of all Ohioans.”

The veto message included several comments from health experts opposing the measure:

  • “One of the most concerning aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic is the ability of an individual to infect another person unknowingly during the asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic phase of the infection.  If the ability of the Ohio Department of Health to only issue executive orders related to those already diagnosed with the infection or exposed to someone who is diagnosed, we fear that there will be millions of Ohioans put at risk given the risk of asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic spread,” said Dr. Andrew M. Thomas, Ohio State Medical Association Council member, during his testimony before the Ohio House of Representatives State and Local Government Committee.
  • “The legislation takes away public health’s ability to be nimble in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic and will limit the ability of public health officials to respond to future infectious disease outbreaks and potential acts of bioterrorism,” Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff, Chief Medical Officer of the Ohio Department of Health, stated during his House testimony.
  • “It’s possible that our number of COVID-19 patients could eventually exceed our hospital’s current capacity,” Dr. Jerry A. Mansfield, Chief Nursing Officer of Mount Carmel Health System stated during his House testimony. “Our staffing levels are stretched thin, and our team of physicians, nurses, and other staff are exhausted.”
  • “The notion that action cannot be taken to prevent the spread of any of these serious illnesses to those who have not been directly exposed is contradictory to public health best practices that have been scientifically tested and verified over the past 100 years,”  the Association of Ohio Health Commissioners during Ohio House testimony.

Below are links to Governor DeWine’s veto message and the messages received in opposition to SB 311.

Update November 30, 2020 5:30 PM

Governor Mike DeWine today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

HOSPITALIZATIONS & ICU ADMISSIONS

Ohio’s COVID-19 hospitalizations have hit an all-time high at 5,060 people hospitalized with the coronavirus across Ohio as compared to just under 1,700 COVID-19 patients on November 1. Of Ohio’s currently hospitalized COVID-19 patients, there are 1,180 individuals in intensive care units and 682 people are on ventilators.

According to Dr. Andy Thomas, Chief Clinical Officer at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, one-third of ICU patients across Ohio have COVID and one-third of individuals on ventilators have COVID.

“COVID patients are going to start crowding out other people who need that level of care as these numbers continue to rise,” said Dr. Thomas. “The reality is that hospitals are making difficult decisions about delaying care. It may be non-urgent care, but it’s care that may cause someone to go to the ICU after surgery. A lot of hospitals are delaying those surgeries because they can’t afford their ICUs to be overtaxed.”

Dr. Thomas reported that rural areas are being hit particularly hard right now, and several hospitals are beginning to voice concerns about their ability to manage such a high number of intensive care patients. As the total number of COVID patients grows, smaller community hospitals will be unable to expand their intensive care capacity.

For individuals who traveled over Thanksgiving, Dr. Thomas urged them to quarantine upon return to Ohio to break any possible chain of transmission.

COVID-19 INDOOR AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM

Governor DeWine today announced a new program to help improve indoor air quality and reduce the transmission of COVID-19 at senior living facilities, including nursing homes, assisted living centers, and adult day centers.

The $28 million program was created using federal CARES Act funding to address indoor air quality through HVAC inspections, portable air filtration systems, new filtration systems, maintenance on current systems, and other interventions. Eligible recipients can receive up to $15,000.

The program was approved by the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) Board of Directors at a special meeting Wednesday. BWC will administer the program and applications are available at bwc.ohio.gov. Additional questions about the program should be emailed to grants@bwc.state.oh.us.

STATE OF OHIO EMPLOYEES

Due to the recent spike in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in Ohio, Governor DeWine has delayed Ohio’s plan to resume in-person work at state-owned facilities. A gradual, phased approach was expected to begin in January. Governor DeWine also encouraged other employers to allow employees to work at home to the extent possible.

ADDITIONAL GUESTS

During today’s briefing, Governor DeWine was joined by four nurses who discussed their experiences treating patients with coronavirus.

Stacey Morris, a COVID unit nurse manager at Cleveland Clinic Akron General, discussed the role nurses play when patients are admitted, as they fight for their lives, and, in the worst circumstances, when they must say goodbye to their loved ones.

Carrie Watkins, assistant director for nursing at Genacross Lutheran Services in Holland, Ohio, discussed the surge in COVID cases that are experienced in nursing homes each time there is a surge in community spread.

Dara Pence, ICU nurse manager at Ohio Health’s Riverside Hospital in Columbus, discussed the unpredictability of the virus and the tragedies that she has witnessed due to COVID-19.

Jamie Giere, a nurse and team leader for the COVID unit at Premier Health’s Upper Valley Medical Center in Troy, Ohio, discussed the surge in patients over the past three weeks and her concerns that the public does not fully understand what is happening in Ohio’s hospitals.

Update November 25, 2020 4:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 23,445 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

Cuyahoga County Map of Covid-19 Cases by Zip Code

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 894-1320.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update November 24, 2020 7:00 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

CASE DATA & UPCOMING HOLIDAY

New data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) shows that 98 more deaths were reported in the past 24 hours which is the second-highest number of deaths reported in a single day in Ohio since the start of the pandemic.

A total of 364 new hospitalizations were also reported throughout the state in the past 24 hours, and 8,604* additional positive COVID-19 cases were also recorded.

Total hospitalizations are also continuing to trend upwards, with 4,449 patients currently hospitalized. Of these, 1,046 patients are in intensive care units.

The current surge in cases is believed to be linked to people gathering on and around Halloween.

“This holiday season, let’s show each other how much we care by making the necessary sacrifices to ensure we will all be healthy to celebrate next Thanksgiving,” said Governor DeWine. “Approximately one in four of all hospitalized patients in Ohio is infected with COVID-19, and this continues to put tremendous stress on Ohio hospitals in every corner of the state.”

“The big fear is if we don’t take the message of masking, distancing, and avoiding big groups seriously, Thanksgiving could result in our hospitals being overwhelmed,” said Ohio Department of Health Chief Medical Officer Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff. “It’s very serious. It’s a matter of personal responsibility, and we owe it to each other.”

*Total case numbers for Ohio are currently incomplete. Thousands of reports are pending review.

OHIO POSITIVITY RATE & TRAVEL

Ohio’s positivity rate, which is the daily percentage of positive tests reported to ODH, has reached 14 percent – just one percentage point shy of Ohio’s travel advisory warning level of 15 percent.

Each Wednesday, ODH releases a travel advisory for Ohio citizens planning to travel to other states which advises against travel to states with a positivity rate of 15 percent or more.

“Like so much of the country, Ohio is now a high-risk area,” said Governor DeWine. “We’re asking that everyone heed the recommendations of the travel advisory, even if you aren’t leaving the state. Please stay home, and ask your friends and family to refrain from visiting this Thanksgiving.”

In addition to Ohio’s travel advisory, the updated Ohio Public Advisory System map will also be published on Wednesday at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

BAR & RESTAURANT ASSISTANCE FUND

Lt. Governor Husted announced that less than half of the eligible permit holders have submitted an application for the Bar and Restaurant Assistance Fund.

Roughly 30 different permit types, including bars, restaurants, breweries, distilleries, wineries, casinos, and private clubs may be eligible. Ohioans can find a list of eligible permits, along with the application, at BusinessHelp.Ohio.gov.

$5 BILLION DIVIDEND FOR OHIO EMPLOYERS

At the urging of Governor DeWine, the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) board voted unanimously to approve issuing $5 billion in dividends to Ohio’s employers in mid-December to ease the financial pressures caused by the coronavirus pandemic. This is nearly four times the dividend BWC issued in October, bringing total dividends this year to nearly $8 billion. Employers should expect to see their checks in the mail in mid-December.

OHIO TO WORK

In September, a new initiative was announced in collaboration with JobsOhio called “Ohio to Work,” to help Ohioans who are looking for a job during the pandemic.

The initiative pulls together employers, nonprofits, educators, and training providers to help Ohioans reskill and restart their careers.

Lt. Governor Husted said today that the program is currently being piloted in the Greater Cleveland area, and October’s first Virtual Career Fair had more than 30 employers with over 1,000 open jobs. More than 700 job seekers attended. The next Virtual Career Fair is Thursday, December 10. To register, visit OhiotoWork.com.

ADDITIONAL GUESTS

During today’s briefing, Governor DeWine and Lt. Governor Husted were joined by four Ohioans who discussed their experiences with COVID-19 and/or their experiences treating patients with serious complications from the coronavirus.

Stephanie Marshall, a respiratory therapist at Grant Medical Center in Columbus, described treating patients struggling with respiratory complications and later being admitted to the hospital herself for serious COVID-19 complications.

Susan Norvell, a Middletown resident, discussed her family’s experience with COVID-19.  All four people in her household were infected with coronavirus, and their experiences ran the full range from asymptomatic to mild symptoms to intensive care.

Matthew Colflesh, MD, from Trinity Medical System in Steubenville, stressed that although the eastern part of the state did not see surges in the spring and summer, their hospitals are now becoming stressed with a high number of hospitalizations.

Jasmin Shavers, a nurse at Miami Valley Hospital in Dayton, discussed her experiences caring for patients in the hospital’s all-COVID intensive care unit.

Update November 23, 2020 8:00 PM

This afternoon, Governor DeWine was joined by leaders of the Ohio Hospital Association to discuss the status of hospital capacity and healthcare personnel needs in Ohio as the number of COVID-19 cases continue to surge throughout the state.

Today, Ohio reported 282 new hospitalizations in the last 24 hours. Additionally, Ohio reported 11,885 COVID-19 cases in the last 24 hours. Due to an electronic lab reporting technology issue, information from multiple labs was not processed for two proceeding days and was consequently included in today’s report.

“On Thursday, Ohio hospitals had more than 3,800 COVID-19 patients, which was the highest patient count we had seen so far.  Today, we are reporting 4,358 COVID-19 hospitalized patients,” said Governor DeWine. “The virus is quickly spreading throughout our entire state and is dramatically impacting all of our healthcare zones and their ability to care for patients.”

At the beginning of the pandemic, Governor DeWine worked with the Ohio Hospital Association to develop a comprehensive statewide public health system to ensure that all Ohioans have access to quality care during the pandemic. As part of this process, the state was divided into three healthcare zones. Leaders of each zone provided an update on hospital capacity in their regions.

ZONE 1

Zone 1 has seen a consistent climb in COVID-19 hospitalizations in recent weeks. Additionally, Zone 1 is experiencing a sharp increase in caregivers becoming ill with COVID-19.

“My biggest concern today is that within the Cleveland Clinic system, alone, we had 970 caregivers out due to coronavirus,” said Robert Wyllie, MD of the Cleveland Clinic. “These caregivers are not catching this in the hospital, but rather in the community.  As the community spread increases, so does the number of caregivers who are in quarantine from exposure or who are sick with coronavirus.”

ZONE 2

Two weeks ago, Zone 2 hit a milestone of 560 COVID-19 patients hospitalized throughout the region.

“On November 2, Zone 2 had 400 patients in our hospitals.  And not even three weeks later, on November 21, we surpassed over 900 patients,” said Andrew Thomas, MD, MBA, of The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. “Until we see cases peak and start to come down in a sustained way, Ohio will continue to see hospitalizations rise.”

ZONE 3

Additionally, Zone 3 has seen an increase in cases and hospitalizations throughout the region.

“In late September, Zone 3 had 90 hospitalizations. This was at a time when we were opening businesses, and kids were going back to school,” said Richard Lofgren, MD, MPH, FACP, and president and CEO of UC Health. “This really speaks to us because we know how to keep this virus at bay. But, unfortunately this virus is now everywhere.”

The increase in hospitalizations throughout the region has taken a toll on caregivers, as well. Several hospitals in Zone 3 have reported a nursing shortage.

RURAL HOSPITALS

Ronda Lehman, PharmD, MBA, FACHE and president of Mercy Health, also discussed the hospital capacity among many rural communities.

“The number of coronavirus patients who require hospitalizations are happening at a faster rate than we are discharging them,” said  Lehman. “The ability to discharge patients safely with adequate care, such as providing oxygen or skilled nursing home placement, is also burdened like our hospital systems.”

Update November 20, 2020 4:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 19,926 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

Cuyahoga County Map of COVID-19 Cases by Zip Code

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 779-1116.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update November 19, 2020 6:00 PM

Health Order Signed Encouraging Ohioans to Stay Home

Governor Mike DeWine today announced that Ohio Department of Health Director Stephanie McCloud signed a health order encouraging people to stay at home during specified hours unless they are working or engaged in an essential activity.

“As COVID-19 continues to spread in Ohio, we need a stronger response to minimize the impact on Ohio’s healthcare and hospital capacity and ensure healthcare is available to those that need it,” said Governor DeWine. “With this order we are discouraging get-togethers and gatherings to minimize the spread of the virus while minimizing the economic impact of a complete shutdown.”

Specifications in this order include:

  • Individuals within the state must stay at a place of residence during the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. except for obtaining necessary food, medical care, or social services or providing care for others.
    • This order doesn’t apply to those that are homeless. Individuals whose residences are unsafe or become unsafe, such as victims of domestic violence, are encouraged to leave their homes and stay at a safe, alternative location.
    • The order does not apply to religious observances and First Amendment protected speech including activity by the media.
  • The order permits travel into or out of the state and permits travel required by law enforcement or court order, including to transport children according to a custody agreement, or to obtain fuel.

Individuals are permitted to leave a place of residence during the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. for the following essential activities:

  • Engaging in activities essential to their health and safety or the health and safety of those in their households or people who are unable to or should not leave their homes, including pets. Activities can include but are not limited to seeking emergency services, obtaining medical supplies or medication, or visiting a health care professional including hospitals, emergency departments, urgent care clinics, and pharmacies.
  • To obtain necessary services or supplies for themselves and their family or members of their household who are unable or should not leave their home, to deliver those services or supplies to others. Examples of those include but are not limited to, obtaining groceries and food. Food and beverages may be obtained only for consumption off-premises, through such means as delivery, drive-through, curbside pickup and carryout.
  • To obtain necessary social services.
  • To go to work, including volunteer work.
  • To take care of or transport a family member, friend, or pet in their household or another household.
  • To perform or obtain government services.

This order will apply for the next 21-days.

Update November 19, 2020 5:00 PM

COVID-19 Update: Critical Hospitalization Levels, New Childcare Dashboards

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

CRITICAL HOSPITALIZATION LEVELS

As of today, there are 3,829 hospitalized COVID-19 patients in Ohio, with 943 of those individuals in the ICU. These are the highest patient counts Ohio has had during the pandemic and more than double the hospitalizations recorded during previous peaks.

While statewide testing has increased by 43 percent, positive cases have increased by nearly 300 percent in the past month.

New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health revealed today that Franklin County has reached a Level 4 Purple Public Emergency with severe exposure and spread. All 88 counties remain at “high incidence” as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For the first time, no counties are rated below Level 2.

“Other counties may not yet be seeing continuous, uninterrupted increases in the same way as Franklin County, but make no mistake – almost all counties are seeing more cases and more healthcare use that could threaten the medical system if they continue,” said Governor DeWine.

Image of Ohio Public Health Advisory Map

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

SENATE BILL 311

Governor DeWine today announced his intention to veto Senate Bill 311 if passed by the Ohio General Assembly.  The bill, which is currently under consideration in the Ohio House of Representatives, would severely limit the ability of the Ohio Department of Health to issue orders necessary to prevent the spread of infectious diseases now and in the future.

“Imagine if a country hostile to the United States smuggles a biological agent into our state and unleashes it in Ohio – our state would need to respond quickly to quarantine the area to stop its spread. This bill would make Ohio slow to respond in a crisis and would put our citizens in severe danger,” said Governor DeWine. “I’ve always listened to the advice of experts, and the experts are telling me this is a dangerous idea. Doctors, nurses, and scientists have all advised me that this bill would do great harm if it became law.”

CHILDCARE DASHBOARDS

Two new COVID-19 dashboards tracking the number of cases at Ohio child care centers are now available.

The first dashboard tracks the number of children and staff cases in individual centers. Because of the small size of home-based providers, many of which serve six or fewer children, positive COVID cases from children and adults in those facilities will be tracked by county on a separate dashboard.

RETAIL COMPLIANCE UPDATE:

Ohio’s Retail Compliance Unit has visited more than 50 percent of Ohio counties in its first three days. Agents have observed over 90 percent compliance in social distancing and mask-wearing in retail establishments, a noticeable improvement.

Update November 17, 2020 5:00 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

STATEWIDE CURFEW

Governor DeWine announced today that the Ohio Department of Health will be issuing a 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. statewide curfew beginning on Thursday, November 19. The curfew will be in effect for 21 days.

The curfew will not apply to those going to or from work, those who have an emergency, or those who need medical care. The curfew is not intended to stop anyone from getting groceries or going to a pharmacy. Picking up carry-out or a drive-thru meal and ordering for delivery will be permitted, but serving food and drink in person must cease at 10 p.m.

Additional details on the 21-day curfew order are forthcoming.

“We’re not shutting down, we’re slowing down,” said Governor DeWine. “The curfew is aimed at helping to reduce the number of person-to-person contacts because the only way virus lives is when it goes from one person to another. We have to flatten this curve again and get this under control.”

The decision to impose a 21-day curfew was made with input from the medical and business communities with consideration to the economic and mental health impacts that another shutdown could cause.

“This is a balanced approach that will slow down people coming together and impact the spread of the virus to the point that it can be controlled, and at the same time, not cause a catastrophic effect in the economy,” said Lt. Governor Husted. “You have to care about both the economy and health – you can’t just care about one in isolation. Based on all of the recommendations we considered, a curfew was the most impactful option with the least disruption.”

Governor DeWine also encouraged Ohioans to do one thing each day that will decrease the spread of the virus through mask-wearing, social distancing, and limiting the number of daily contacts.

VACCINE PREPOSITIONING

Governor DeWine today provided details on Ohio’s vaccine prepositioning plan.

The Ohio Department of Health has identified 10 sites across the state that will receive the pre-positioned vaccine after a COVID-19 vaccine is given emergency-use authorization. Once the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices issues its recommendation on how to use the vaccine, these sites will begin administering the vaccine immediately to those who choose to receive it and are identified as able to receive it in the first stage.

Ohio will first vaccinate those who are most at risk, including those who work in long-term care facilities, nursing homes, and other congregate-care facilities, high-risk health care workers, and first responders.

The ten pre-positioned sites were selected based on geography, population, and access to ultra-cold storage capacity. Other sites will begin receiving shipments of vaccine following final approval, potentially just days after the pre-positioned sites begin administering the vaccine.

Governor DeWine once again encouraged citizens to remain vigilant in practicing safety measures until a vaccine is available.

HOME AND HEALTHY FOR THE HOLIDAYS

As students at Ohio’s colleges and universities are preparing to head home for the holidays, the Ohio Department of Higher Education and Ohio Hospital Association are launching a new campaign to encourage students to keep themselves and family members safe while they’re at home.

The “Home and Healthy for the Holidays” campaign will provide tips for students to follow before, during, and after holiday travel. The campaign will also share information for students on what they should do if they have no access to testing or if they receive a positive or negative test result.

College students are encouraged to share how they plan to be safe during the holidays by posting to social media using the hashtags #HomeandHealthyfortheHolidays and #BackOnCampus21.

NEW HOLIDAY GUIDE

Governor DeWine announced the release of a new holiday celebration guide from the Ohio Department of Health to help families celebrate safely during the 2020-2021 holiday season.

The guide provides alternatives to large in-person celebrations for a variety of holidays, including Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Las Posadas, Christmas, Kwanzaa, Orthodox New Year, and others.

“This year’s holidays will look different as we make adjustments to keep our loved ones and ourselves healthy, so we can celebrate together in the future,” said Governor DeWine. “Regardless of what holidays you celebrate, please keep the celebration small, and wear a mask and stay socially distanced if you absolutely must celebrate with individuals outside of your household.”

The holiday gathering guide is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Update November 16, 2020 4:30 PM

ODJFS to Provide Up to $25 Million in CARES Act Grants to Nonprofit Agencies

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) today announced the process for nonprofit organizations that serve low-income and at-risk Ohioans to apply for federal CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act grants. Up to $25 million will be awarded.

“Those who were in need prior to this pandemic are even more vulnerable now, and many of the organizations assisting them have been struggling, as well,” said ODJFS Director Kimberly Hall.  “We are pleased to be able to provide this assistance to organizations that have accumulated unemployment debt as a result of the pandemic and are devoted to helping Ohioans during difficult times.”

Organizations that receive funding can use it to apply to their unemployment debt or bolster their workforces by rehiring staff they may have had to lay off.

Applications will be accepted until Nov. 27 at jfs.ohio.gov/nonprofitgrants.

The grants are part of a larger package of more than $419.5 million in CARES Act funding developed by Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, Lt. Governor Jon Husted and the General Assembly to provide funding for small businesses, restaurants and bars, hospitals, higher education, arts,
nonprofits, and low-income Ohioans impacted financially by the pandemic.

Update November 16, 2020 10:30 AM

Health Order to Limit Mass Gatherings Signed

Governor Mike DeWine announced that Ohio Department of Health Interim Director Lance Himes signed a revised health order to limit mass gatherings in Ohio.

“Despite the health order that limited mass gatherings to 10 people that was signed in April remaining in effect, we have seen rampant spread of the virus as a result of banquets, wedding receptions, and social gatherings following funerals,” said Governor DeWine.  “We have seen great tragedy associated with such events.  It’s not the ceremonies causing the problem.  It’s the party afterward.”

In order to minimize the spread of COVID-19 through airborne particles passing between people in close contact, wedding receptions, funeral repasts, and other events at banquet facilities are subject to the following restrictions:

  • No socializing or activities in open congregate areas and no dancing.
  • Guests must be seated at all times. Traditional wedding reception events such as first dance, toasts, tossing the bouquet and cutting the cake are permitted.
  • If serving food and beverages, guests must be served at their seats. No self-serve buffets and no self-serve bar areas permitted.
  • Masks must be worn at all times unless actively consuming food or beverages.
  • No more than 10 people should be seated at a table and those individuals must be from the same household.

This order does not apply to religious observances; First Amendment protected speech, including petition or referendum circulators, and any activity by media; and to governmental meetings which include meetings that are required to be open to the public.

This order goes into effect November 17, 2020 at 12:01 a.m

Update November 13, 2020 6:30 PM

Health Order Enforcing Mask-Wearing in Retail Locations Signed

Governor Mike DeWine today announced that Ohio Department of Health Interim Director Lance Himes signed a health order to enforce mask-wearing in retail locations across the state in compliance with the statewide mandatory mask order signed on July 23, 2020.

“Every retail employee has the right to work in an environment that is as safe as can be, which means all customers must wear masks.  Further, each Ohioan who goes out to shop has the right to know that every store they enter will be safe and the people they encounter in that store will be wearing a mask,” said Governor DeWine. “We know that masks work.  They are the easiest, most cost-effective way to limit the spread of COVID-19.”

This order restates that everyone 10 years-old or older must wear a facial covering when in a retail store and includes the following provisions:

Retail Locations

  • All retailers must post and enforce a sign indicating that masks are required at all entrances. Employees are not required to put themselves in jeopardy or risk harm when enforcing this order.
  • All retailers must post at all entrances a maximum capacity limit to ensure a minimum of six-feet physical distance can be maintained throughout the location.
  • All retailers should mark six-feet separation spots in all check-out lines.
  • All retailers should arrange all store aisles to be directionally one-way, if required to achieve appropriate social distancing.
  • All retailers should place hand sanitizer stations at high-contact locations.
  • All retailers must require employees to stay home if symptomatic.
  • All retailers must disinfect high-touch areas after each use (e.g. carts, baskets, and other equipment).
  • All retailers should provide reasonable accommodation to any person unable to wear a mask into the store by providing online or telephone ordering and curbside, non-contact pick up or a delivery option and/or allowing a person to wear a full face shield that extends below the chin. Each retailer must post a sign at each entrance detailing these accommodations.
  • Customers are strongly urged to utilize online or telephone ordering and curbside, non-contact pick-up or delivery options.
  • This order does not apply to those medically or developmentally unable to wear a face covering.
  • Each business should designate an on-site compliance officer for each business location and each shift during all business hours to enforce these requirements.

Compliance Enforcement

  • State of Ohio employees with enforcement powers, including the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation Retail Compliance Unit employees working on behalf of the Ohio Department of Health, representatives of local health departments, and local law enforcement are authorized to inspect and enforce the order.
  • All retailers shall allow representatives of the Ohio Department of Health, a local health department, or law enforcement to inspect public areas during business hours.
  • The representative will issue an initial warning to the business before issuing a notice of violation requiring closure.
  • If a notice of violation of these orders is issued by a representative from the Ohio Department of Health, a local health department, or law enforcement, the retail location must immediately shut down for no longer than 24 hours to allow for dissipation of COVID-19 airborne droplets.
  • Citizens observing non-compliance should notify the Ohio Department of Health call center at 1-833-4ASKODH (1-833-427-5634).

This order does not apply to restaurants, bars, banquet and catering centers, hair salons, day spas, nail salons, barber shops, tattoo parlors, body piercing locations, tanning facilities, gyms, dance instruction studios, or personal fitness venues as these businesses fall under previously-issued, existing orders.

This order takes effect beginning at 12:01 a.m. on November 16, 2020.

Update November 13, 2020 5:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 16,736 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 668-890.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update November 12, 2020 5:00 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

STATEWIDE HIGH INCIDENCE 

New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health found that all 88 counties in Ohio remain at “high incidence” as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

According to today’s updated Ohio Public Health Advisory System map, 68 counties are currently rated as having a very high risk of exposure and spread (Red Level 3), up from 56 counties last week. This represents the highest number of Red Level 3 counties since the launch of the advisory system in July.

Both Franklin and Tuscarawas counties met six of seven advisory-system indicators and are approaching Purple Level 4.

Ohio also had another record-breaking day for new cases reported in a 24-hour period, with 7,101 cases reported between yesterday and today. A total of 268 new hospitalizations were reported, as well as 35 more deaths.

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

NEW ZIP CODE DASHBOARD

Governor DeWine today announced the creation of a new zip code dashboard. Ohioans can now view data from their local communities and filter data by probable or confirmed case status, county, a specific zip code, or a specific time period.

Case counts will also be available on a downloadable, filterable chart sorted from the most cases to the least. To protect confidentiality, case counts for zip codes with fewer than five cases or less than 100 total residents will not be displayed.

The new zip code dashboard can be found at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

NEW FLU DASHBOARD

Governor DeWine also announced a new flu dashboard that expands the statewide data that the Ohio Department of Health shares on seasonal flu activity each year.

The new dashboard shows flu trends over time with charts that indicate whether flu hospitalizations or cases of flu-like illness are on the rise or decline as compared to the previous week and compared to the five-year average data.

Hospitalization data is broken down by region, county, date, sex, age, race, and ethnicity. The data shows only positive flu PCR tests reported by public health laboratories and selected clinical laboratories that participate in the national flu monitoring system.

Additional data will be added moving forward, and the dashboard will be updated every Friday at 9 a.m.

The new flu dashboard can be found at flu.ohio.gov.

FUNDING FOR LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENTS

Governor DeWine announced that the state is setting aside $30 million to assist the state’s 113 local health departments. Each department will receive $200,000 and will have the flexibility to determine how to best use the funds as they see fit to fight COVID-19.

The remaining money will be used to hire contact tracers to support local health departments. Contact tracers will deploy where they are needed across the state to assist in identifying individuals who may have been exposed to COVID-19 and prevent further spread.

GRANT ASSISTANCE STILL AVAILABLE

Lt. Governor Jon Husted today reminded Ohio small businesses that the application period for the Small Business Relief Grant and Bar and Restaurant Assistance Fund is now open.

The Small Business Relief Grant provides a $10,000 grant to small businesses with at least one but no more than 25 employees. The grant funding will help businesses pay for a variety of expenses, including mortgage or rent payments; utility payments; salaries, wages, or compensation for employees and contractors; business supplies or equipment; and other costs. Grants will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. To ensure the grants are spread throughout the state, $500,000 will be set aside for businesses in each of Ohio’s 88 counties. When a county’s allocation is depleted, businesses in that county will be eligible to receive grants from the remaining funds in the overall grant program.

The Bar and Restaurant Assistance Fund provides $2,500 for those permit holders who haven’t been able to fully use their liquor permit. Businesses with an on-premise consumption permit through the Ohio Department of Commerce will be eligible to receive $2,500 per unique business location. Businesses need to have an active on-premise permit as of close of business on October 23, 2020.

More information can be found at BusinessHelp.Ohio.gov.

Update November 11, 2020 8:00 PM

Governor DeWine Calls on Ohioans to Recommit to Safety Practices, Announces New Mask, Social Distancing Orders

In a statewide address to Ohioans Wednesday evening, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine called on citizens to recommit to their individual efforts to prevent coronavirus spread as Ohio moves through its most intense, widespread, and dangerous surge of cases to date.

Ohio is currently facing a record number of coronavirus-related hospitalizations and intensive care admissions, with nearly 3,000 people in the hospital, including more than 700 people in the ICU. During the first week of November alone, 104 Ohioans infected with the coronavirus died.

“With this new wave of COVID-19, the onset of flu season, and an already-exhausted group of healthcare workers, there are serious concerns that there won’t be enough people to fully staff our healthcare facilities in the next few weeks,” said Governor DeWine. “If we don’t change this, Ohio won’t be able to provide appropriate care for COVID patients or for Ohioans who require other emergency care for things like accidents, strokes, and heart attacks. Hospitals will again be forced to postpone important, but less urgent, care.”

Although testing capacity in Ohio has nearly doubled, the number of people testing positive for the coronavirus has increased almost four times. At the end of September, Ohio averaged under 1,000 new cases per day; this week, Ohio hit a record high of more than 6,500 new cases reported in a single 24-hour period.

“As we wait for the vaccine, which could come as soon as December, we have so much to protect,” said Governor DeWine. “What each Ohioan does in his or her own life impacts every citizen and every place we desperately want and need to keep open– our schools, nursing homes, hospitals, and businesses.”

To reinforce the necessity of wearing masks and slowing virus spread, Governor DeWine announced two forthcoming orders:

Revised Mask Order

Although most people and businesses have properly followed COVID-19 safety guidelines issued in Ohio’s July 23, 2020, mask order, others are not following the order.

To protect frontline workers and customers, the Ohio Department of Health will reissue Ohio’s mask order and add the following provisions:

  • Each store will be required to post a sign outlining face-covering requirements at all public entrances to the store;
  • Each store will be responsible for ensuring that customers and employees are wearing masks; and
  • A new Retail Compliance Unit, comprised of agents led by the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, will inspect to ensure compliance. A first violation will result in a written warning and a second violation will result in closure of the store for up to 24 hours.

New Social Gathering Order

Ohio’s April order that limits public events and private gatherings of more than 10 people is still in effect, however, there has been rampant spread of the virus as a result of banquets, wedding receptions, and social gatherings following funerals.

To address the tragedies that have resulted from such events, the Ohio Department of Health will issue an order that will place significant new restrictions on these social activities. Specifically, open congregate areas will no longer be permitted to open, and everyone will be required to be seated and masked unless they are actively consuming food or drinks.

Bars, restaurants, and fitness centers may remain open, but this will be reassessed one week from tomorrow for potential closure.

“If the current trend continues and cases keep increasing, we will be forced to make these closures,” said Governor DeWine. “I am very well aware of the burden this will place on employees and owners, but these are places where it is difficult or impossible to maintain mask-wearing, which we know now is the chief way of slowing this virus.”

Update November 11, 2020 2:15 PM

$2 Million of CARES Funding for Utility Assistance Approved
Financial Relief Available for Residents Impacted by COVID-19 Pandemic

Cuyahoga County announced today a new program to help eligible residents with utility payments. A grant agreement put forth by County Executive Armond Budish requesting approval to use $2 million of CARES Act funding to provide utility assistance to residents who have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic was approved today by County Council. CHN Housing Partners, the organization administering the Cuyahoga County Rent Relief Fund, will also administer the utility assistance program funded by the County.

“We are continuing to do everything we can to assist residents in need during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic,” said Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish. “During this pandemic, the need for rent and utility aid has never been greater. CHN Housing Partners reported that 66 percent of applicants seeking rental assistance are also seeking utility assistance. This program will support eligible residents in need of assistance paying sewer, water, wastewater, electric, and gas utilities.”

“Besides rent, paying utility bills is one of the biggest struggles for working families during this pandemic,” said Kevin J. Nowak, executive director of CHN Housing Partners. “We are grateful to Executive Budish and County Council for allocating precious dollars to help county residents stay safely housed during this crisis.”

Applicants must meet the eligibility criteria of being at or below 120 percent of Median Household Income (MHI) and have been impacted by COVID-19, such as through the loss of income, childcare needs, or illness.

The program is expected to run from November 11, 2020 through December 30, 2020 but could go longer if an extension for CARES funding is approved by Congress that would allow for the program to extend beyond December 2020.

To apply for the utility assistance funds, go to: www.chnhousingpartners.org/utilityassistance

For questions or help applying, call 833-377-7368.

Update November 9, 2020 4:00 PM

This afternoon, Governor DeWine was joined by incoming Ohio Department of Health Chief Medical Officer Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff and leaders of the Ohio Hospital Association to discuss the status of hospital capacity in Ohio as the number of COVID-19 cases continues to surge throughout the state.

There are currently over 2,500 hospitalizations statewide, up from 2,000 hospitalizations on Thursday. A total of 154 hospitalizations were reported in the last 24 hours alone.

“In Ohio, we are seeing an unprecedented spike in hospital utilization and it is impacting all areas of the state. While we are better prepared with personal protective equipment and physical capacity, what we are seeing now is an increasing demand on our staffing,” said Dr. Vanderhoff. “If we don’t control the spread of this virus, we won’t be able to care for those who are acutely ill without postponing important, but less urgent, care. We anticipate that this kind of shift could happen in a matter of weeks if trends don’t change.”

“The COVID-19 pandemic is becoming more dire for Ohio as hospitalizations have escalated 350 percent in the past 50 days to 2,533 COVID patients in Ohio hospitals today,” said Mike Abrams, president and CEO, Ohio Hospital Association. “Our hospitals are capable of managing capacity needs, but we must stem the spread now. This steep climb creates a severe strain on our caregivers who are braving the frontline of this pandemic. We can stop this spread, and we call on Ohioans to join hospitals and caregivers to take action now and do the right thing to slow the spread.”

At the beginning of the pandemic, Governor DeWine worked with the Ohio Hospital Association to develop a comprehensive statewide public health system to ensure that all Ohioans have access to quality care during the pandemic. As part of this process, the state was divided into three healthcare zones. Leaders of each zone provided an update on hospital capacity in their regions.

ZONE 1

Of all hospitalizations in the state, more than 50 percent are in Zone 1, but there are currently enough hospital beds, personal protective equipment (PPE), 

utilized and intensive care beds utilized in Zone 1 currently stands at 70 to 75 percent. This zone, however, is seeing many caregivers becoming ill with COVID-1

 

“What we’re asking everyone to do is double down. Now is the time to wear a mask and socially distance – if not to protect your family medication, and ventilators. Total beds and friends, do it to protect the caregivers who protect COVID patients and other hospitalized patients.”

At the Cleveland Clinic alone, there are currently 300 caregivers out due to the coronavirus.

“It’s not because they’re catching COVID in the hospital. What we’re seeing is they’re catching it in the community,” said Robert Wyllie, MD, of the Cleveland Clinic.

ZONE 2

Last Monday, Zone 2 hit a milestone of 400 patients in the hospital, and by Friday, the number surpassed 500 patients. Today there are over 560 COVID-19 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in Zone 2.

Because patients are normally admitted 7 to 14 days after symptoms arise, hospitals are expecting to see hospitalizations continue to increase for at least two weeks after COVID-19 cases peak which could impact non-COVID care.

“We need the citizens of Ohio do to the same things they did in the spring and summer – take seriously masking, distancing, washing hands, and especially avoiding large gatherings of people you don’t live with where you can’t control your environment and you can’t protect yourself or loved ones from someone in that crowd who is asymptomatic positive,” said Andrew Thomas, MD, MBA, of The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

 

ZONE 3

Zone 3 has had an unprecedented increase in COVID-19 hospitalizations since the beginning of October. There are over 670 patients hospitalized today, as compared to 300 patients at the peak of the previous surge in July. In the greater-Cincinnati area, the positivity rate had been approximately 3 percent but is now standing at approximately 8 percent.

In Zone 3, the growth of hospitalizations is doubling every three weeks. Right now, Zone 3 can accommodate the current capacity of patients, but if the doubling of cases continues to accelerate, this zone could exhaust resources and may have to defer non-COVID care.

“If we do what we did in the past – adhering to social distancing, wearing a mask, washing hands, and not expanding your personal bubble, we can bring the spread of this virus under control,” said Richard Lofgren, MD, MPH, FACP, and president and CEO of UC Health.

RURAL HOSPITALS

Ronda Lehman, president of Mercy Health, Lima region, also discussed the hospital capacity in their hospital system, which encompasses many rural communities. There is currently adequate capacity of PPE, ventilators, and hospital beds, however, hospitalizations are increasing. On October 5, the hospital system had 17 COVID-19 patients, and today they are treating 75 patients who are COVID-19 positive.

“This is a stark challenge for us because this is in addition to the normal fall flu and critical illness admissions, and it’s not sustainable,” said Lehman. “This is not a metro problem, this is a statewide and countrywide problem. Those in small communities should recognize that their behaviors do have a substantial impact to their neighbors, their local hospitals, the people they worship with, the people they go to school with, and the people they care about in their circles.”

Update November 6, 2020 4:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 15,247 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 625-796.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update November 5, 2020 2:00 PM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

RECORD-BREAKING CASES & HOSPITALIZATIONS

Governor DeWine announced today that Ohio is once again breaking records in regard to COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations.

  • Between yesterday and today, health officials have reported a total of 4,961 new positive coronavirus cases in Ohio, the highest number of new cases in a 24-hour period to date.
  • There are currently 2,075 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 which is a 55 percent increase in hospitalized patients compared to two weeks ago.
  • Of the hospitalized patients, 541 people are in intensive care. The previous record for intensive care admissions was 533 in April.

“This virus is flaring up, and we have to push it down – the economy depends on it,” said Governor DeWine. “If the virus continues to aggressively spread, people will lose confidence in their ability to safely go to stores, restaurants, and other businesses. If we want to keep our economy moving, we must all live with this virus and we must all be more careful.”

Governor DeWine stressed that the new record number of cases is not due to increased testing capacity in the state. Since September 24, the total number of tests in Ohio has increased by approximately 44 percent, but positive cases have increased 280 percent in the same time period. If a person is tested multiple times, they are only counted once.

STATEWIDE HIGH INCIDENCE 

New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health revealed today that all 88 counties in Ohio are now considered “high incidence” as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“There have been so many cases in the past two weeks that the risk of catching this virus in every county of this state is very real and very concerning,” said Governor DeWine. “Again, I ask everyone to recognize their personal responsibility in slowing the spread of this deadly disease. It’s up to every citizen in Ohio to choose to slow the spread by wearing masks, distancing, and making overall smart decisions.”

According to today’s updated Ohio Public Health Advisory System map, 56 counties are currently rated as having a very high risk of exposure and spread (Red Level 3), up from 43 counties last week. This represents the highest number of Red Level 3 counties since the launch of the advisory system in July. As of today, 86 percent of Ohioans are living in a Red Level 3 county.

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

NEW OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH STRUCTURE

Governor DeWine announced multiple key additions to the existing administration at the Ohio Department of Health (ODH).

Chief Medical Officer Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff: Dr. Vanderhoff previously served for more than a decade as a Senior Vice President and as the Chief Medical Officer at OhioHealth. He has years of experience leading large teams in successfully dealing with important healthcare issues in Ohio and prepared OhioHealth to deal with the threat of Ebola and the H1N1 flu pandemic.

Director Stephanie McCloud: Director McCloud previously served as Governor DeWine’s administrator of the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, managing an agency of 1,800 colleagues and over $28 billion in assets. She has considerable experience in the area of mental health and addiction treatment which is a priority in Ohio’s health improvement plan.

Senior Deputy Lance Himes: Himes had previously served as the interim director of ODH where he has played an integral role in running and managing many aspects of the pandemic response operation. He will lead the coordination of the state’s vaccine distribution plan and will continue to work directly with Ohio’s local health commissioners.

Chief of Staff Kathleen Madden: Madden had previously served as Assistant Director at the Ohio Office of Budget and Management and will now play a key role in keeping ODH’s pandemic and non-pandemic programs and operations on track. She will work to prioritize and resolve critical issues, provide oversight and guidance to ODH staff, and ensure that ODH funds are spent responsibly and strategically.

Other key members of the ongoing COVID-19 response who will continue their roles in assisting ODH are:

Adjutant General Maj. Gen. John Harris, Ohio National Guard: Maj. Gen. Harris will continue work to ensure complex operations, such as COVID testing and contact tracing, are well-coordinated, monitored, and improved when necessary.  He will also work directly with Senior Deputy Himes on the planning and logistics of the forthcoming vaccine distribution program.

Director Ursel McElroy, Ohio Department of Aging: Director McElroy will continue to direct virus prevention efforts for older adults in the community and in long-term settings, including nursing homes and assisted living facilities.

Director Lori Criss, Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services: Director Criss will continue to lead efforts to address the increasing mental health needs of citizens during the pandemic.

Update October 30, 2020 2:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 14,521 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 605-758.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update October 29, 2020 4:30 PM

Governor Mike DeWine today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

RECORD-BREAKING CASES

Governor Mike DeWine announced today that Ohio has now hit a record number of cases reported in a single 24-hour period. Between yesterday and today, health officials have reported a total of 3,590 new positive coronavirus cases in Ohio which is more than 700 cases more than the previous high number of cases reported last Saturday. A total of 194 new hospitalizations were also reported in the past 24 hours, the third-highest number of hospitalizations reported in a single day so far.

“The virus is raging throughout the state, and there is no place to hide,” said Governor DeWine. “We must face this virus head-on with the tools that we know can beat this virus back: masks, social distancing, washing hands frequently, and good ventilation when inside.”

UPDATED OHIO PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORY 

New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health found that 43 counties currently have a very high risk of exposure and spread (Red Level 3), up from 38 counties last week. This represents the highest number of Red Level 3 counties since the launch of the advisory system in July. As of today, 78 percent of Ohioans are living in a Red Level 3 county. Less than 1 percent of Ohioans live in a Yellow Level 1 county.

Although Clark, Cuyahoga, and Hamilton counties are no longer listed on Ohio’s watch list, there are still serious concerns about spread of the coronavirus in these counties.

“Our alert system is designed to flag indicators that are getting worse, and what we are seeing is that these three counties have plateaued at high levels,” said Governor DeWine.

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

COVID DEFENSE TEAMS

Governor DeWine today called on community leaders in each county to immediately form a local COVID Defense Team consisting of county commissioners, mayors, local hospital leaders, health commissioners, business leaders, religious leaders, and other local leaders.

Each COVID Defense Team will be responsible for assessing COVID-19 spread in their communities, taking inventory of the assets in the community, and focusing on what steps are necessary to slow the spread of the coronavirus among their citizens.

Update October 27, 2020 5:15 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine today announced that 82 of Ohio’s 88 counties are now considered high incidence counties as defined by the federal government. This means that the county has seen more than 100 cases per 100,000 residents in the last two weeks.

Governor DeWine also announced that number of patients treated in Intensive Care Units at hospitals throughout the state are at the highest rate since the beginning of the crisis. He said that based on the indicators we have not yet reached the peak of our hospitalizations, and the ICU utilization has doubled since the beginning of October. Governor DeWine explained that most of Ohio’s cases are a result of community spread.

“As the virus spreads in the community from gatherings where people aren’t wearing masks or social distancing, it directly impacts our ability to keep our schools open, to protect our vulnerable elderly in nursing homes, and to keep our hospitals from being over-run and exceeding capacity,” said Governor DeWine.

Governor DeWine reminded Ohioans of the fundamental ways to stop the spread of the virus.

  • Wear a mask when you are out in public, when you go to a store, and when you are with friends.
  • Keep your distance.
  • Wash your hands often.
  • Keep your building well-ventilated.

He also asked Ohio businesses to allow employees to work from home, when possible; to remind employees of the ways they can stop the spread of the virus; and require customers to wear masks.

Governor DeWine also called on community leaders to inventory where they are in the battle against COVID-19. He asked them to work together to assess where they are, what they need to do, and set goals in their fight against the virus. The Governor and Lt. Governor will begin calls with the community leaders to develop strategies forward, starting with the three counties on the watch list.

ELECTION UPDATE

Governor DeWine was joined by Secretary of State Frank LaRose today for an update on the election on November 2, 2020. Secretary LaRose outlined the precautions that the Board of Election offices are taking to keep Ohioans safe while voting. Secretary LaRose also reminded Ohioans that they can cast their vote early in person, by mail or on election day.

Additional information about the election, such as hours of polling locations, can be found at VoteOhio.gov.

Update October 23, 2020 4:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 13,771 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 582-696.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update October 22, 2020 6:15 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

TAKE THIS SERIOUSLY 

Governor DeWine today released Ohio’s updated Public Health Advisory System map. New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health found that 38 counties currently have a very high risk of exposure and spread (Red Level 3), up from 29 counties last week. This represents the highest number of Red Level 3 counties since the launch of the advisory system in July. As of today, 92.8 percent of Ohioans are living in a county that is Red Level 3 and/or high incidence. Only 1 percent of Ohioans live in a Yellow Level 1 county.

Three counties are currently on Ohio’s Watch List, meaning that they are approaching Purple Level 4: Clark, Cuyahoga, and Hamilton counties.

In the past 24 hours, an additional 2,425 new COVID-19 cases have been reported, the highest number of new cases in any 24-day reporting period since the start of the pandemic. Of the top 10 days with the most newly reported cases, eight have occurred in the past nine days, and nine have occurred in October.

According to local health departments across the state, spread is primarily occurring during social and family gatherings. Many counties are also seeing a sustained increase in hospitalizations.

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

FORMER NEW JERSEY GOVERNOR CHRIS CHRISTIE

Former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie virtually joined today’s public briefing to discuss his recent diagnosis with COVID-19. Governor Christie spent a week in ICU fighting the disease.

Governor Christie said, in part:

“I thought I was safe, and I was wrong. I took my mask off, and I left it off, but only for the time that I was inside the White House gates. Three days later I began to feel what I call the freight train of symptoms that happen with COVID-19 – fever, headaches, incredible body aches, chills, sweats, and it overcame me in a period of 24 hours. I had gone from feeling fine and doing my work on a Friday afternoon to by Saturday at 1:00 being admitted to the hospital and taken immediately to the intensive care unit where I stayed for the next six and a half days.

“I want everyone to understand that this is one of the most unpredictable, random, and brutal viruses you’ll ever see. My message to the people of Ohio and the people of this country is that there is no place to hide from this virus if you are not going to take the common-sense steps recommended to us: wear a mask when you’re outside, remain socially distant from people, no big crowds, and wash your hands frequently.

“I just want to urge as many people as I can, don’t let your guard down. It’s not worth it. I made a huge mistake by taking that mask off. It’s something I hope no other Americans have to go through.

“One of the things I think people don’t understand about this disease – because it’s so random and because so little is understood – is that when you’re there and going through it, the psychological effect it has on you is significant. You start to think about life and death. It’s like getting beaten up from the inside out, and that combination of physical and psychological stress – it’s unique in my life and pretty extraordinary.

“I know how tired everyone is of this, I felt it myself, but as tired as you are of strapping that mask on or going to the sink and washing those hands again – you will take those days in a heartbeat compared to getting this disease.”

Governor Christie’s full interview is available on the Ohio Channel’s YouTube page.

#DaytonMASKots

Lt. Governor Jon Husted announced the launch of the “Dayton MASKots” campaign facilitated through the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce to slow the spread of the coronavirus while supporting Ohio sports.

This campaign challenges team mascots around the region and state to “mask up” and post a picture of their mascot with a mask on. This could be for a K-12 school, college or university, or other sports team.

Ohioans can use the hashtag #DaytonMASKots to join this effort.

APPRENTICEOHIO

The Lt. Governor also announced that Ohio recently received two RAPIDS apprenticeship rankings: number four in the U.S. for number of apprentices and number one among the 28 states with state apprenticeship systems.

Ohio offers apprenticeship opportunities in traditional fields such as construction and manufacturing and in non-traditional apprenticeship fields such as IT and healthcare. ApprenticeOhio programs provide full-time work during the training period as well as decent wages – so Ohioans can earn while they learn.

More information can be found at Apprentice.Ohio.gov.

Update October 20, 2020 5:15 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

RECORD-BREAKING HOSPITALIZATIONS

Governor DeWine announced today that hospitals across Ohio are currently treating 1,221 COVID-19 patients which is the most hospitalized patients at one time since the start of the pandemic. A total of 216 of these hospitalizations were reported in the past 24 hours which is the highest number of hospitalizations reported in a single day and more than 50 hospitalizations more than the previous high in mid-July.

Ohio is also recording an increase in ICU admissions and ventilator utilization.

“So far, Ohio’s hospitals still have adequate remaining capacity to care for everyone who is sick, but our hospitalizations are already breaking records, and we are not seeing any signs of Ohio’s case numbers slowing down,” said Governor DeWine. “If we don’t buckle down, wear our masks, and take care of each other, I am very concerned that our hospitals will begin to fill up. We pushed this virus down before, and it’s up to all of us to do it again.”

Ohio also reported 2,015 new COVID-19 cases since yesterday. Sixty-nine of Ohio’s 88 counties have a high incidence of COVID-19 spread, meaning their rate of cases is more than 100 cases per 100,000 population in the past two weeks.

SOCIAL GATHERINGS

The White House Coronavirus Task Force strongly recommends that Ohioans limit gatherings with family and friends to prevent the virus from spreading to those most at risk of complications. The recommendation follows the increase in community spread in Ohio initiated by small social gatherings.

“It’s the same thing I’m hearing when I speak with county health commissioners. They are seeing the most spread in Ohio from informal gatherings,” said Governor DeWine. “We can’t let our guard down; we must keep our masks on.”

Governor DeWine also urged caution for sports fans who gather this weekend to watch the Ohio State, Browns, and Bengals football games.

$1.3 BILLION GOING TO OHIO BUSINESSES

Dividend checks from the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation will be mailed to employers beginning this week.  The dividend amount totals approximately $1.3 billion.

The money is being given back to employers in response to Governor DeWine’s request in August that the Ohio BWC Board of Directors approve a second dividend to provide financial support for public and private employers impacted by the ongoing pandemic.

These checks will be mailed to employers throughout the end of October.

A wide-ranging program to address the needs of struggling Ohioans, including funding for rent, mortgages, and water and sewer utility bills, as well as funding for small businesses and nonprofits, will be announced in the near future.

LONG-TERM CARE FACILITY DASHBOARD

Ohio’s new long-term care facility dashboard is now available at coronavirus.ohio.gov. The new dashboard outlines visitation information at nursing facilities across the state. Those with loved ones in a nursing facility can search for information by county or facility to find information on the types of visits that are offered and when they are permitted. Nursing facilities were permitted to allow indoor visitations beginning October 12.

Details regarding the visitation guidelines for Ohio’s intermediate care facilities can be found in a public health order issued on September 24. Visitation at intermediate care facilities was permitted to resume on September 28.

VACCINE PROVIDER REGISTRATION

Governor DeWine announced that Ohio has submitted its Interim Draft COVID-19 Vaccine Plan to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The plan is a framework on how Ohio will proceed once a vaccine is available. The plan will be available tomorrow at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

The Ohio Department of Health will also be launching a new registration tool for health care providers who would like to eventually administer the COVID-19 vaccine. Providers, such as local health departments, hospitals, pharmacies, and nursing facilities, will be notified soon with instructions about how they can register.

TEST RESULT REPORTING

The Ohio Department of Health has developed a technology solution to allow their systems to track negative test results. In response, Interim Director of Health Lance Himes today amended a directive that now requires all labs to start sharing all positive, negative, inconclusive, and invalid test results related to COVID-19 tests with the Ohio Department of Health.

Previously, labs were reporting positive COVID-19 results at the individual level and as an aggregate count for all other test results.

“Adding these categories will allow us to gather additional data for a more complete picture of how COVID is spreading in our communities,” said Governor DeWine. This will also allow us to provide positivity data by county in the coming weeks.”

Update October 16, 2020 4:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 13,107 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 552-674.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update October 15, 2020 5:00 PM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine today released Ohio’s updated Public Health Advisory System map. New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health found that 29 counties currently have a very high risk of exposure and spread (Level 3):

Adams, Butler, Clark, Cuyahoga, Fayette, Franklin, Greene, Guernsey, Hamilton, Highland, Lawrence, Licking, Lucas, Madison, Mahoning, Marion, Mercer, Montgomery, Muskingum, Pike, Portage, Putnam, Richland, Ross, Stark, Summit, Scioto, Union, and Warren

“We have 70 counties that are either red or high incidence. That’s 10 million Ohioans or 85% of the population, living in an area with a high risk of community transmission,” Governor DeWine said.

Governor DeWine reviewed the seven indicators of the Ohio Public Health Advisory System, which assess the degree of the virus’ spread in each county. The seven indicators are:

  • Indicator 1: New cases per capita
  • Indicator 2: Sustained increase in new cases
  • Indicator 3: Proportion of cases not in congregate setting
  • Indicator 4: Sustained increase in Emergency Department visits for COVID-like illness
  • Indicator 5: Sustained increase in outpatient visits for COVID-like illness
  • Indicator 6: Sustained increase in new COVID hospital admissions
  • Indicator 7: Intensive Care Unit bed occupancy

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

INCREASED SPREAD IN CASES

Governor DeWine also announced the state’s positivity rate was 5.4% and the seven-day average was 4.2%. This is up from September when the positivity rate was 2.7%. He reported that today Ohio has 1,042 COVID inpatients in hospitals, which is a significant increase from the 563 patients on September 20, 2020.

Governor DeWine spoke with Dr. Nick Dreher, medical director of the Population Health Innovation Institute at MetroHealth System, and Dr. David Margolius, division director of internal medicine at MetroHealth System about the recent rise in COVID-19 cases in Ohio.

Dr. Margolius told Ohioans that if they are planning to spend time with family and friends, they need to do it safely, by wearing a mask and practicing social distancing.  Dr. Dreher reminded Ohioans that they know how to fight the spread of COVID-19 and need to continue following the proper prevention methods to avoid stress on Ohio’s hospital systems.

“The only way, the only way we can beat this virus back is to follow the prevention methods we have been talking about since the beginning of the pandemic,” said Governor DeWine. “Stay home when you are sick. Social distance. Wear a mask. Always.”

Update October 13, 2020 4:45 PM

Governor Mike DeWine today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

INCREASING CASES

Governor DeWine today cautioned that the continuing increase in COVID-19 cases indicates that significant numbers of infections are likely this winter unless citizens take steps to mitigate and control the spread of the virus.

In the last seven days, Ohio COVID-19 cases have averaged 1,475 cases per day by report date as compared to an average of approximately 1,000 cases per day only two weeks ago. Ohio’s current positivity rate is 4.1 percent as compared to 2.7 percent on September 23 and 24. A total of 51 counties are considered high incidence and/or Alert Level 3 on Ohio’s Public Health Advisory System.

LAB CAPACITY DASHBOARD

Governor DeWine today announced the creation of a new Lab Capacity Dashboard to help pharmacists, nursing homes, colleges and universities, employers, and others administering COVID-19 tests find a lab to run their samples. This new resource will help connect groups that are testing with available labs in order to ease turnaround times and inform Ohioans of their COVID-19 status.

The new dashboard provides self-reported information about labs that can run tests, including hours of operation, types of tests they accept, estimated turn-around time, and locations. Labs with available capacity can sign up on the website to be included in this dashboard.

BINAX-NOW TESTING PLAN

Governor DeWine today discussed plans for Abbott BinaxNOW COVID-19 antigen screening tests that the federal government is providing to Ohio.

This week, Ohio is deploying thousands of these screening tests to colleges and universities to help them implement proactive screening plans. Next week, Ohio will begin sending tens of thousands of screening tests to nursing homes for both routine and outbreak testing requirements.

Governor DeWine emphasized that lab-based PCR tests are still considered the “gold standard” test that provides the most accurate results, and antigen tests can have false positives and false negatives.

Governor DeWine also cautioned that testing should not be considered a substitute for precautions such as wearing masks, social distancing, and avoiding large gatherings.

Update October 9, 2020 4:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 12,644 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 542-668.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update October 8, 2020 4:30 PM

Governor Mike DeWine today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine today released Ohio’s updated Public Health Advisory System map. New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health found that 18 counties currently have a very high risk of exposure and spread (Level 3): Ashland, Butler, Fayette, Hamilton, Lawrence, Madison, Mahoning, Marion, Mercer, Montgomery, Muskingum, Pike, Portage, Putnam, Richland, Ross, Scioto,  and Trumbull.

“We have 18 Red counties, which is more than we’ve seen since the week of July 23,” said Governor DeWine. “Additionally, there are 58 Orange counties this week, the highest ever. 96% of Ohioans are living in a Red or Orange county. The virus continues to spread quickly throughout the state, and we need to continue staying at home when sick, wearing a mask when out, and keeping at least six feet between you and those outside of your household.”

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

NURSING HOME VISITATION ORDER

Governor DeWine announced that Ohio Department of Health Interim Director Lance Himes has signed the order that allows nursing facilities to permit indoor visitation beginning Monday, October 12th. In order to permit indoor visitation, facilities are required to meet certain health and safety requirements.

The visits will be limited to two visitors and will be a maximum of 30 minutes. Visitors will have to be socially distanced and wear a face covering. Visits are to occur in areas that are separate from a resident’s room.

Facilities are required to report visitation information, including visitation status, hours, maximum visitation time, and number of visitors via an online dashboard at coronavirus.ohio.gov. Facilities must register with the state by October 19th.

In addition, this order also details compassionate care visits, which are separate and distinct from normal visitation. These visits are not exclusively for end-of-life situations, but can also include situations where a resident was recently admitted to the home and are struggling with the change in environment and lack of family support.

Other situations can include when a resident is grieving someone who recently passed away, a resident that may need encouragement to eat or drink that was previously provided by a family member or caregiver and is experiencing weight loss or dehydration, or when a resident is experiencing emotional distress.

Facilities should work with residents, families, caregivers, resident representatives, clinicians, and the Office of the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman program to identify the need, length, and frequency of these visits.

The order is available on coronavirus.ohio.gov.

 

Update October 6, 2020 4:30 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS

Governor DeWine noted today that although COVID-19 hospital admissions in Ohio had been declining since peaking in mid-July, hospitalizations are now trending upwards with an increasing number of hospitalizations in rural Ohio.

The average age of hospitalized patients has also gone up in recent weeks. Ohioans 60 and older now account for approximately 70 percent of COVID hospital admissions as compared to 50 percent of hospitalizations in July.

Regionally, the western part of the state has been seeing an increase in hospital admissions and relatively fewer hospital admissions have been occurring in northeast and central Ohio.

All regions of the state currently have adequate hospital capacity.

NOTE: Hospital admissions are a lagging indicator. Admissions for the week of September 27th are expected to rise as new information is received.

CONTINUED PRECAUTIONS

Governor DeWine today reminded Ohioans to continue to take necessary precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19. He stressed that President Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis  should serve as a reminder that anyone can become ill with coronavirus and that citizens should remain diligent in their efforts to prevent virus spread.

“Each of us can demonstrate our love and respect for our fellow Ohioans by wearing a mask, avoiding large gatherings, keeping at least 6 feet of distance from others, and frequently washing our hands. This is in our control,” said Governor DeWine. “This virus is an enemy of our freedom, but by doing these things to fight back against it, we’ll keep our kids in school and our economy moving forward. All of us working together will allow us to live with this virus until the time when it is gone.”

QUARANTINE STUDY

Governor DeWine announced today that he has authorized a study focused on school students who are quarantined due to meeting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s definition of close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19.

“We have heard anecdotally that most quarantined students are not getting sick, but I believe that it is important to have data and evidence before considering a change to the recommended guidance,” said Governor DeWine.

ECONOMIC RECOVERY RELIEF PACKAGE

Governor DeWine announced that his administration is working closely with the Ohio General Assembly on a plan to distribute CARES Act funding to help citizens who are struggling to pay their rent, mortgage, or water and sewage utility bills. The plan will also focus on providing aid to small businesses and non-profits.

More information on the economic recovery relief package is expected to be released soon.

PPE MANUFACTURING

Lt. Governor Husted recognized Phoenix Quality Manufacturing for their work to produce N95 masks, creating 40 jobs in Jackson County. The facility will convert 23,000 square feet of the former Elemetal (Ohio Precious Metals) facility into an N95 mask manufacturing operation.

The project has received a $250,000 JobsOhio revitalization grant and a $500,000 PPE grant from the Ohio Development Services Agency. They also received support from the Governor’s Office of Appalachia, Appalachian Growth Capital, and various investors. Phoenix Quality Manufacturing plans to start producing masks in November for local, state, and international customers.

Update October 2, 2020 4:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 12,349 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 527-657.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update October 1, 2020 5:00 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine today released Ohio’s updated Public Health Advisory System map. New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health found that 11 counties currently have a very high risk of exposure and spread (Level 3): Ashland, Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, Mercer, Montgomery, Muskingum, Pike, Putnam, Richland, and Scioto. Richland County is on the borderline of a Level 4 public emergency with severe exposure and spread.

“We have 11 red counties, which is more than we’ve seen at any point in September,” said Governor DeWine. “Although many Ohioans are working hard to keep this virus in check, unfortunately, we are seeing a rebound in some areas of the state. This pandemic isn’t over, so please continue to stay home if you’re sick, wear a mask when you’re out, and keep at least six feet between you and those outside of your household.”

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

SEPTEMBER SUMMARY

Governor DeWine today released new data summarizing cases, hospitalizations, and deaths reported in Ohio’s 88 counties so far in September. The counties are ranked by cases per 100,000 people.

PREVALENCE TESTING

Lt. Governor Husted also held an on-air discussion with Dr. Abby Norris Turner of Ohio State University. Dr. Norris Turner described the prevalence testing Ohio State conducted on behalf of the Ohio Department of Health in order to assess how many Ohioans have already contracted COVID-19. The study was conducted over 20 days in July 2020 and included a sample of 727 adults. The study showed that approximately .9 percent of Ohioans were likely infected with COVID-19 during the study, and approximately 1.5 percent had prevalence of COVID-19 antibodies during the study period in July. You will soon be able to access a summary of the study at coronavirus.ohio.gov and viewing the Dashboard Overview page.

 

Update September 29, 2020 5:00 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

WASTEWATER TESTING

Governor DeWine provided an update today on the Ohio Coronavirus Wastewater Monitoring Network which tests wastewater for gene fragments of COVID-19.

Those infected with COVID-19 begin to shed the virus early in their infection, and a significant, sustained increase in gene fragments found in wastewater can be an early warning sign of a pending rise in COVID-19 cases in a specific area. The value of this information is that gives communities an opportunity to act proactively to prevent outbreaks.

Since the launch of the monitoring program, the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) has notified health authorities in six communities of a sustained increase in gene fragments found in their wastewater: Dayton, Columbus, Akron, Oregon, Sandusky, and Mansfield.

ODH is currently monitoring 36 sites across the state and an additional 25 sites will be added during the coming month. Communities found with a sustained increase in gene fragments are offered testing and contact tracing assistance.

The Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction (ODRC), in partnership with Ohio State University, has also begun monitoring wastewater at Ohio’s prisons to prevent spread among staff and inmates. A sustained increase in COVID-19 gene fragments in a prison’s wastewater will trigger a series of actions within the prison to prevent spread, including the testing of all staff. Staff members working in prisons free of COVID-19 will have access to on-site voluntary testing.

Update September 25, 2020 5:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 12,030 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 518-652.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update September 24, 2020 5:00 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine today released Ohio’s updated Public Health Advisory System map. New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health found that nine counties currently have a very high risk of exposure and spread: Ashland, Butler, Delaware, Mercer, Montgomery, Pike, Putnam, Scioto, and Stark.

A total of 67 counties stayed at the same level as last week, and Portage County dropped from Level 3 to Level 2.

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

HIGHER EDUCATION SCREENING

Governor DeWine announced today that Ohio’s ResponsibleRestart guidelines for higher education will now include a recommendation that all residential colleges and universities regularly test a sample population of asymptomatic students.

“Some schools are already doing this, and screening asymptomatic students really gives school leaders a good idea about virus spread on their campuses,” said Governor DeWine. “Our expectation is that colleges and universities will screen at least 3 percent of their at-risk population on a regular basis.”

The updated ResponsibleRestart Ohio guidance will be posted to coronavirus.ohio.gov in the next few days.

INDOOR VISITATION

Governor DeWine announced two new health orders that will allow for indoor visitation at nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and intermediate care facilities in Ohio.

Intermediate Care Facilities:

The Ohio Department of Health today issued the Director’s Order to Limit Access to Ohio’s Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities and to Permit Visitation. Intermediate care facilities for Ohioans with developmental disabilities can resume indoor visitation beginning on Monday, September 28, if safety standards outlined in the order are met.

Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities

Nursing homes and assisted living facilities can begin allowing indoor visitation on Monday, October 12. This date was selected to allow adequate time for the facilities to prepare their physical plants, adjust staffing levels, update visitation policies, and communicate expectations with residents and families.

Indoor visitation at nursing homes and assisted living facilities should only resume if certain safety standards are met. These standards will be outlined in a forthcoming public health order.

When visitation resumes, a Long-Term Care Facility Dashboard will be added to the COVID-19 data dashboard at coronavirus.ohio.gov where users can access facility-specific visitation information.

SPORTS ORDER MODIFICATION

Lt. Governor Husted announced that the one-game-per-calendar-day limit on sports competitions has been removed from the current sports order, which will be available soon on coronavirus.ohio.gov.

This change comes over a month after the most recent guidelines were published with evidence showing that events have gone on without any noticeable increase in spread.

Update September 22, 2020 5:00 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today gave the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

DEMOGRAPHIC DASHBOARD

Governor DeWine today unveiled a new case demographics dashboard on coronavirus.ohio.gov.

The new dashboard gives citizens access to COVID-19 case data by race or ethnicity. The data can be broken down by age and county and compared to the overall Ohio population.

CONTRACT TRACING

Governor DeWine today encouraged Ohioans to answer the call if contacted by a contact tracer.

Contact tracing slows the spread of COVID-19 by notifying people who may have been exposed to COVID-19 and advising them to monitor their health for signs and symptoms; helping those who may have been exposed get tested; asking people to self-isolate or self-quarantine if appropriate; helping people identify the resources they need to safely stay at home.

Contact tracers will not disclose a person’s identity to their contacts, however, those who test positive will be encouraged to notify those they’ve been in contact with so that these individuals also respond to contract tracers and begin to isolate.

FACE MASK DONATION

Lt. Governor Husted announced that Ford is donating 2 million medical grade face masks to the state of Ohio for healthcare providers, first responders, underserved populations, and senior living communities. The donation is part of the Ford Fund’s commitment of 100 million medical-grade face masks through 2021.

The company, currently manufacturing 2.5 million medical-grade masks a week for its employees and at-risk communities, is growing the number of mask-making machines by mid- to late-October to increase production and deliver on its goal. Ohio’s Department of Administrative Services and Development Services Agency have partnered with JobsOhio to work with the Ford Government Relations Team, as well as many others, to secure lifesaving personal protective equipment since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Update September 21, 2020 11:00 AM

City of Lakewood To Follow Ohio Department of Health Guidance for Halloween
Use caution and plan ahead for celebrating Halloween amid the COVID-19 pandemic

The City of Lakewood will adhere to the Ohio Department of Health’s “Celebrating Halloween” guidance released on Friday, September 18th. Trick-or-treat activities will be from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM on Saturday, October 31st in Lakewood.

To protect the safety and health of all members of our community while celebrating Halloween, the City of Lakewood encourages caution for Halloween and other fall festivities. While broad in nature to cover the situations experienced by most Ohioans, the Ohio Department of Health’s “Celebrating Halloween” guidance provides the following good advice for Lakewoodites:

For Parents/Guardians of Trick-or-Treaters

  • If taking your children trick-or-treating, limit the number of houses you visit and ask your children to stay as far from treat-givers as possible. For small children, consider holding the bag for them.
  • Wipe off candy wrappers with sanitizing wipes when you arrive home. (NOTE: Never wipe unpackaged food with wipes.)
  • Allow children to eat only factory-wrapped treats. Avoid homemade treats made by strangers.
  • If your child is at greater risk of complications from COVID-19, contact your doctor before allowing participation in Halloween activities.

For Community Members

  • For trick-or-treating, reach out to neighbors to discuss ways to ensure 6-foot social distancing, how candy can most safely be distributed, and the need for face coverings.
  • Refrain from having children select their own treats from a bowl/common container or set up a hand-sanitizing station. Consider placing treats on porch steps or a table in the driveway with a sign asking children to take only one. Or use other creative ways to distribute treats, such as using a candy “slide” made of PVC pipe, or hanging treats from a wall or fence.

For more information, visit https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/static/responsible/celebrating-halloween.pdf

Update September 18, 2020 4:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 11,736 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 512-646.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

 

Update September 17, 2020 6:00 PM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS
Governor DeWine today released Ohio’s updated Public Health Advisory System map. New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health found that five counties currently have a very high risk of exposure and spread: Butler, Mercer, Montgomery, Portage and Putnam.

A total of 69 counties stayed at the same level as last week, and one county, Preble, dropped from Level 3 to Level 2.

In addition to the five Level 3 counties listed above, five additional counties meet the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s definition of high incidence: Athens, Delaware, Greene, Harrison, and Pickaway. Although these counties do not meet enough indicators to trigger a Red Level 3 Public Emergency, these counties have had more than 100 cases per 100,000 residents over the last two weeks which could lead to rapid virus transmission if steps are not taken to slow the spread.

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

NEW DATA DASHBOARDS
Governor DeWine announced the state has launched the Schools Dashboard and the Children’s Dashboard to provide school districts and parents the best information to make decisions about their child’s education and social interactions. The Schools Dashboard will show new and cumulative COVID cases reported to schools by parents/guardians and staff. The data can be sorted by county or school district and includes students and staff. Schools are required to report cases to their assigned Local Health Department who then report to the Ohio Department of Health.

The Children’s Dashboard, developed in consultation with the Ohio Children’s Hospital Association, includes information about cases and hospitalizations related to COVID-19 among children aged 0-17 in Ohio by selected demographics and county of residence. Both dashboards are available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

FLU SHOT REMINDER
Governor DeWine announced that the state of Ohio has its first, documented case of the flu in Putnam County. He reminded Ohioans of the importance of getting a flu shot this year to reduce the spread of the flu and its impact on our hospital systems. While it doesn’t protect you from COVID-19, it does provide another layer of protection to keep yourself, your family, friends and communities healthy.

Those who are elderly and need help getting to their physician’s office can contact their local Area Agency on Aging at 866-243-5678 to access transportation resources and other services.

Anyone without a primary healthcare provider can visit vaccinefinder.org to find nearby pharmacies and other healthcare locations offering the flu vaccine.

RAPID RESPONSE GUIDE FOR MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKERS
Governor DeWine announced that the state is releasing the Rapid Response Guide for Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers. This guide will support local health districts in developing culturally appropriate plans to respond to outbreaks in the migrant and seasonal farmworker communities. A copy of the guide will be available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

In addition, the Ohio Department of Health is awarding $2.6 million in CARES Act funding to agricultural camp operators to improve the health and safety of migrant workers worksites and camps to reduce the transmission of COVID-19. The improvements will focus on reducing housing density, installing touchless equipment, partitions, and hand washing stations. The Department of Health and the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services are distributing face masks, hand sanitizer, disinfectant cleaner, and digital forehead thermometers to workers and operators.

CORONAVIRUS WASTEWATER SURVEILLANCE NETWORK
Governor DeWine also provided an update on Ohio’s Coronavirus Wastewater Surveillance Network. Since mid-July the network has been monitoring income waste at wastewater treatment plants around the state to test for gene fragments of COVID-19. Ohio is currently testing in more than 30 cities across the state and will expand testing to more than 50 locations in the next month. The state will continue to closely monitor the wastewater data and ensure communities are aware of trending increases in gene copies to assist with quick response and prevent further spread of disease. More information about the program can be found at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

HALLOWEEN
Governor DeWine reminded parents that Halloween activities will be different this year than in years past. He encouraged parents and children to wear a mask, practice social distancing, avoid large groups, and to stay home if sick. Final decisions on whether to hold or participate in trick-or-treating or other events should be made by local communities, individuals, and parents. The state will be developing guidance for Halloween and it will be posted on coronavirus.ohio.gov to help communities and families plan for the holiday.

LOST WAGES ASSISTANCE
Governor DeWine announced that the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) has started distributing $300 per week in Lost Wages Assistance to eligible unemployment insurance recipients. This assistance is available to Ohioans who received traditional unemployment benefits, Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), Trade Readjustment Assistance, SharedWork Ohio or extended benefits for weeks ending August 1st through September 5th. PUA claimants will receive payments first, in a staggered manner with individual payments for each week they qualified for the program.  For Ohioans receiving other types of unemployment benefits, there will be one retroactive payment for all weeks they qualify.

Currently ODJFS is working to complete the programming necessary to disperse payments. Updates on this process can be found at jfs.ohio.gov/lwa.

Update September 16, 2020 8:30 AM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine yesterday gave the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

TESTING IN NURSING HOMES AND ASSISTED LIVING FACILITIES

Governor DeWine and Director Ursel McElroy of the Ohio Department of Aging provided an update on testing in nursing facilities, assisted living facilities, adult day centers, and adult day cares. Directory McElroy explained that frequent testing in congregate settings is important to control the spread of the virus.

She also mentioned that adult day care and senior centers will open on September 21st. The facilities will test staff every other week and participants if they present symptoms. Outdoor visitation started at Ohio nursing homes on July 20th. If visitors have questions about protocols or concerns about a facility in their area, they can contact the Ohio Department of Aging. The Department of Aging is working on a dashboard to increase transparency about the status of visitation at facilities across the state.

OHIO TO WORK

Governor DeWine, along with JP Nauseef, president and CEO of JobsOhio, announced that JobsOhio and the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, the Governor’s Office of Workforce Transformation and the Ohio Development Services Agency will launch a pilot initiative called Ohio To Work. The Initiative will help connect Ohioans looking for a job to a new job opportunity. Ohio To Work brings together employers, nonprofits, educators, and training providers to help Ohioans reskill and restart their careers. Individuals participating in Ohio To Work will be provided a career coach, be invited to virtual career fairs, and be connected to employers ready to hire. The first Ohio To Work initiative will be launched in Cleveland- Cuyahoga County. Ohioans can learn more at OhioToWork.com.

Update September 11, 2020 4:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 11,467 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 504-643.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update September 11, 2020 9:45 AM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted yesterday provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine released Ohio’s updated Public Health Advisory System map. New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health found that six counties currently have a very high risk of exposure and spread: Butler, Mercer, Montgomery, Preble, Putnam, and Summit.

A total of 68 counties stayed at the same level as last week, and two counties, Lucas and Wayne, dropped from Level 3 to Level 2.

In addition to the six Level 3 counties listed above, four additional counties meet the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s definition of high incidence: Clark, Hamilton, Miami, and Wood. Although these counties do not meet enough indicators to trigger a Red Level 3 Public Emergency, these counties have had more than 100 cases per 100,000 residents over the last two weeks which could lead to rapid virus transmission if steps are not taken to slow the spread.

Data calculations conducted by the Ohio Department of Health also show the continued increase in cases among younger adults in the age groups of 0-19 and 20-29. 

A county-by-county breakdown outlining the presence of COVID-19 in all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

FLU SHOTS

With flu season approaching, Governor DeWine today reminded Ohioans of the importance of getting a flu shot this year. The Governor, along with First Lady Fran DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted, all received their flu shots this afternoon.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that everyone 6 months of age and older receive an annual flu shot, with rare exception.The recommendation includes flu shots for pregnant women, whose vaccinations can protect their babies after birth.

“While the flu can be deadly on its own, we also are concerned that Ohioans who get both the flu and COVID-19 at the same time could become severely, if not fatally, ill,” said Governor DeWine. “Our youngest and oldest Ohioans, those who are pregnant, those in long-term care facilities, and those with chronic health conditions may be especially susceptible to severe illness or complications from the flu.”

Those who are elderly and need help getting to their physician’s office can contact their local Area Agency on Aging at 866-243-5678 to access transportation resources and other services.

Anyone without a primary healthcare provider can visit vaccinefinder.org to find nearby pharmacies and other healthcare locations offering the flu vaccine.

Update September 9, 2020 11:45 AM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted yesterday gave the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

PANDEMIC ELECTRONIC BENEFIT TRANSFER PROGRAM

Governor DeWine announced  that thousands of Ohio children, who qualify for free or reduced-price meals but are currently learning remotely, will soon receive additional money to purchase nutritious foods through the Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer (P-EBT) program made possible by the Federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act.

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services will issue this second round of benefits later this month to eligible children. Ohio previously issued more than $250 million in P-EBT benefits to more than 850,000 students through the program in the spring.

Parents do not need to apply to receive these benefits. The benefits will be automatically loaded onto existing Ohio Direction cards or a pre-loaded card will be sent in the mail.

NON-CONGREGATE SHELTERING ORDER

In response to a barrage of rumors surrounding Ohio’s latest non-congregate sheltering order, Governor DeWine today stressed that there are no orders in Ohio to create “FEMA camps” to quarantine citizens against their will.

“This is not in our order, and there is no truth to the rumor,” said Governor DeWine. “Families will not be separated, and kids will not be away from their loved ones.”

The order, which was first issued on March 31 and then renewed on April 29 and August 31, creates a funding mechanism to allow for federal reimbursement for communities that choose to offer alternate locations for people to safely isolate or quarantine outside of their homes. If a citizen chooses to recover in a quarantine housing location, others in the household can remain at home and unexposed.

This option has been used in a handful of cases in Ohio.

Update September 4, 2020 4:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 11,224 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 491-635.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update September 4, 2020 8:45 AM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted yesterday provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine released this week’s Ohio Public Health Advisory System map. New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health indicates that seven counties currently have a very high risk of exposure and spread.

A total of 67 counties stayed at the same level as last week, and 12 counties moved from orange to yellow. There are now a total of 39 counties in the yellow level, the highest number since July 2. Detailed information all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website.

SCHOOL REPORTING ORDER

Governor DeWine announced details for Ohio’s forthcoming case reporting order for K-12 schools.

Beginning Tuesday, September 8, parents or guardians and school staff should notify their school within 24 hours of receiving a positive test or a clinical diagnosis. Within 24 hours after receiving that notification, the school should notify other parents and guardians about that case in writing, providing as much information as possible without releasing protected health information. The school must also notify their local health department within 24 hours.

Beginning Tuesday, September 15, and each Tuesday thereafter, local health departments will report the number of newly reported and cumulative cases to the Ohio Department of Health. The Ohio Department of Health will publish this data by school or school district, including a breakdown by students and staff, each Thursday.

“We understand there is a balance between privacy and transparency, and we do not intend for protected health information to be released in our effort to provide information to Ohioans so they can make the right decisions for their family,” said Governor DeWine. “Please remember that if a school has positive cases among their students or staff, it does not mean the school did anything wrong. Schools cannot control spread in the community, so it is important to practice safety measures not only in the classroom but also when you’re out in the community.”

The order will also require each school district or school to identify a COVID-19 coordinator to facilitate the reporting of case information, and upon request, schools or buildings are required to provide the local health department a copy of their pandemic plan.

LABOR DAY AND SPREAD BY YOUNG OHIOANS

Governor DeWine once again encouraged Ohioans to take proper safety precautions over the upcoming Labor Day weekend. He stressed that citizens can still have fun, visit family, and travel, but face coverings, social distancing, and hand washing should also be part of your plans.

“It’s not about where we go, but rather, what we do when we get there,” said Governor DeWine. “It’s about how we act when we’re with family and friends and what precautions we take. The decisions we make as we celebrate the unofficial end of summer will play a major role in how we begin the fall.”

Governor DeWine also reminded young Ohioans of their responsibility to follow safety precautions, especially students attending a college or university.

Case data shows that those aged 18-22 currently make up 35-40 percent of all young Ohioans who have tested positive for the virus which is a significant increase from previous months.

“In Cincinnati, multiple off-campus parties with students attending from several universities on August 17 have resulted in at least 78 confirmed cases,” said Governor DeWine. “Although college students might not get seriously ill, they could spread the virus to others who could. The responsibility falls on all of us to protect each other.”

WASTEWATER MONITORING NETWORK

Governor DeWine announced that information from Ohio’s new Coronavirus Wastewater Monitoring Network is now available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

The network was developed to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19 through the study of wastewater samples. The presence of coronavirus gene copies/fragments can be found in the waste of symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals and can be detected in wastewater as many as three to seven days before those infections lead to increases in case counts or hospitalizations in a community.

Update September 2, 2020 8:15 AM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted yesterday provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

LABOR DAY PRECAUTIONS

In advance of the upcoming Labor Day holiday, Governor DeWine reminded citizens to take safety precautions when celebrating with others outside of their households.

“Today Ohio reported its highest number of new cases since the end of July, which is a stark reminder that this virus has not gone away and it continues to spread in our communities,” said Governor DeWine. “As you consider gathering with family and friends this weekend, please remember that COVID-19 still represents a significant risk to the lives and livelihoods of citizens in Ohio.”

Governor DeWine encourages citizens to continue regular hand-washing, social distancing, and disinfecting. The mask mandate in Ohio remains in effect for all 88 counties.

In the weeks following the Fourth of July, Ohio began to see a significant increase in cases caused, in part, by holiday gatherings. The graphic below demonstrates one example of COVID-19 spread from an Independence Day gathering.

BROADBAND EXPANSION EFFORTS

Lt. Governor Husted announced that over 900 grant requests have been approved for the K-12 Broadband Connectivity Grant to go towards hotspots and internet-enabled devices. This enables 121,000 students to gain high-speed internet in their homes, thanks to the devices provided by this grant based on information provided by the schools. In areas where there are barriers to take-home devices, the grant will also support the creation of new public wi-fi and mobile wi-fi spaces to help students connect to the internet. There are over 645,000 students in schools that are increasing their public wi-fi or using mobile wi-fi.  Those students will have a place to go to access the internet if they do not have access in their homes.

Update August 28, 2020 4:45 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 10,689 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 465-621.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update August 27, 2020 5:45 PM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine released this week’s Ohio Public Health Advisory System map. New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health indicates that six counties currently have a very high risk of exposure and spread. This is the lowest number of Level 3 counties since the Ohio Public Health Advisory System was developed. In addition, 76 counties have remained at a consistent level, which is the lowest movement between levels that Ohio has experienced.

Detailed information all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website. The system was developed to provide local health departments, community leaders, and the public with data and information on the severity of the COVID-19 spread in the counties in which they live. The system consists of four levels with specific risk-level guidelines. Each level is calculated with data gathered on seven public health indicators.

K-12 CASE REPORTING

Governor DeWine announced that the Ohio Department of Health will be issuing an order that requires K-12 schools to establish a mechanism for parents and guardians to report confirmed cases of COVID-19 among their children.

Schools should notify parents/guardians in writing about each case and include as much information as possible without disclosing protected health information. Schools should also make non-identifying information about positive COVID-19 cases publicly available.

The forthcoming order will also direct all K-12 schools to report confirmed cases to their local health department, which will then report new cases and cumulative case data for students and teachers to the Ohio Department of Health. This aggregate data will be published at coronavirus.ohio.gov each Wednesday.

SPORTS ORDER MODIFICATION

Lt. Governor Husted announced that the current sports order has been modified to clarify that participants shall not compete in more than one contest or game in any calendar day, as compared to the 24-hour period outlined in the original order. The goal of this adjustment in language is to assist organizers and teams when scheduling games or contests.

ASSISTED LIVING TESTING PAUSE

Governor DeWine announced that Ohio is pausing its work to test residents and staff at assisted living facilities through saliva testing instead of nasal swabs due to inconsistent test results. The Ohio Department of Health will investigate the issue through controlled validation testing to determine if the irregularities can be attributed to the test kits themselves, the labs, or the specimen collection process.

Update August 25, 2020 3:45 PM

Governor DeWine and Lt. Governor  Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

SPORTS ORDER VARIANCE PROCESS

Governor DeWine  discussed the recently-issued Director’s Order that Provides Mandatory Requirements for Youth, Collegiate, Amateur, Club, and Professional Sports.

The order limits the maximum number of spectators gathered at an outdoor sports venue to the lesser of 1,500 individuals or 15 percent of fixed, seated capacity. The maximum for indoor sports venues is the lesser of 300 individuals or 15 percent of fixed, seated capacity.

If a venue has more room to permit additional socially-distanced spectator capacity, a variance provision in the order allows schools to request a higher spectator limit by submitting a plan in writing to their local health department and the Ohio Department of Health. The variance plan must include a justification for increased capacity and an explanation of how social distancing will be maintained between family groups.

It is the responsibility of the school/venue to monitor and enforce the social distancing requirement, prohibition on congregating among spectators, and the other provisions outlined in the sports order.  Evaluating a sports venue’s variance plan may require conversations with school/venue officials and a site visit. The Ohio Department of Health will rely upon local health departments to conduct the first assessment of the variance plan.

Variances will not be granted to expand the number of fans beyond family members of both teams and others who may perform during the event.

ENTERTAINMENT VENUE ORDER

Interim Ohio Department of Health Director Lance Himes today signed the Director’s Order that Provides Mandatory Requirements for Entertainment Venues. 

Update August 24, 2020 8:45 AM

On Friday, Governor DeWine announced that Ohio Department of Health Interim Director Lance Himes will be signing a reopening order for performance theaters in the near future, but details are still being worked on. However, to give arts organizations the opportunity to begin planning for performances, the order will say that interior venue attendance will be capped at the lesser of 15% of their fixed-seated capacity or 300 people, while outdoor venue attendance will be capped at the lesser of 15% of their fixed seating capacity or 1,500 people. Many of the other guidelines in the forthcoming order will align with the limits on spectators at sports venues in the Director’s Order that Provides Mandatory Requirements for Youth, Collegiate, Amateur, Club and Professional Sports.

Governor DeWine also released guidance for performing arts theaters and sports venues.

When the accompanying orders are signed they will be posted on coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Update August 24, 2020 8:15 AM

On Friday, the Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for the week.   There are a total of 10,192 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 442-613.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update August 21, 2020 9:30 AM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted yesterday provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine released this week’s Ohio Public Health Advisory System map. New health data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health indicates that nine counties currently have a very high risk of exposure and spread.  Cuyahoga County has been downgraded to a Level 2 Public Emergency.

“Ohio continues to see a shift in virus spread. In urban areas, where residents have been wearing masks longer, we’re seeing spread decline, but rural areas are seeing more spread,” said Governor DeWine. “The best ways to stop the virus continue to be staying home when you can, wearing your mask and social distancing when you go out, and washing your hands often.”

Detailed information all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website. The system was developed to provide local health departments, community leaders, and the public with data and information on the severity of the COVID-19 spread in the counties in which they live. The system consists of four levels with specific risk-level guidelines. Each level is calculated with data gathered on seven public health indicators.

ADULT DAY CARE AND SENIOR CENTERS

Governor DeWine announced  that adult day care centers and senior centers may open at a reduced capacity beginning on September 21 if the facilities can meet certain safety standards outlined in a forthcoming health order.

The Ohio Association of Senior Centers and those representing adult day centers nationally and locally assisted in developing the ResponsibleRestart Ohio plan for adult day care and senior centers. The full plan and health order will be posted soon at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

NURSING HOME AND ASSISTED LIVING TESTING

Governor DeWine announced that a statewide testing initiative for Ohio’s more than 765 assisted living facilities is now underway to offer baseline saliva testing to all staff and residents at no cost to the facilities.

The tests can be self-performed or performed with assistance, under the observance of licensed medical staff. Baseline saliva tests are minimally invasive and provide reliable results in approximately 48 hours upon the lab’s receipt.

Click here to view the full order requiring all assisting living facilities to participate in the testing initiative.

BWC DIVIDEND AND MASK DISTRIBUTION

Governor DeWine  asked the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) Board of Directors to send up to $1.5 billion in dividend payments to Ohio employers this fall.  This dividend equals approximately 100% of the premiums paid in policy year 2019.  Dividends like this, as well as previous ones, are possible because of strong investment returns on employer premiums, a declining number of claims each year, prudent fiscal management, and employers who work hard to improve workplace safety and reduce injury claims.

If approved by the Board, this would be the second dividend of $1 billion or more since April and the third dividend since 2019.  BWC anticipated providing a dividend next year, but with Board approval, they will issue one now to provide some immediate economic relief to employers amid the ongoing pandemic. Checks would be distributed by BWC in late October.

Additionally, Governor DeWine asked BWC’s Board of Directors to approve of a second distribution of face coverings to Ohio employers and their workforce as part of BWC’s Protecting Ohio’s Workforce- We’ve Got You Covered program.  This second round will consist of approximately 23 million masks to employers and are meant to replace any masks that have exhausted their effective use. Governor DeWine has also asked that BWC work to purchase as many masks as possible made in Ohio.

In the first distribution of face coverings, BWC shipped 20.6 masks to 197,000 employers and their workforce.

PPE FOR BOARDS OF ELECTION

Governor DeWine announced today that the Ohio Department of Administrative Services (DAS) will be working with Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose to ensure that Ohio’s 88 boards of elections have the personal protective equipment (PPE) needed to execute early in-person voting and voting on election day.

DAS will provide an estimated 800,000 masks, 64,000 face shields, and 26,000 gowns, and the Secretary of State’s office is expected to distribute the PPE in early September.

Update August 19, 2020 1:30 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted  yesterday provided the following update on the status of the COVID-19 pandemic in Ohio.

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS:

Governor DeWine announced that an order from the Ohio Department of Health will be issued to outline how sports, both contact and non-contact, may move forward in Ohio. The order will apply to all organized sports in the state and will include guidelines for spectators. The decision for high school fall sports to be postponed to the springtime will be left to the school districts.

Click here to read the full sports health order.

Update August 15, 2020 1:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for this week.   There are a total of 9,610 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 425-595.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.

Update August 14, 2020 10:30 AM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted provided the following updates yesterday on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine announced today that new public health data has led the Ohio Department of Health to designate 12 counties as being in a Red Alert Level 3 Public Emergency as defined by the Ohio Public Health Advisory System.

Detailed information all of Ohio’s 88 counties can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website. The system was developed to provide local health departments, community leaders, and the public with data and information on the severity of the COVID-19 spread in the counties in which they live. The system consists of four levels with specific risk-level guidelines. Each level is calculated with data gathered on seven public health indicators.

IMPROVING MINORITY HEALTH

Governor DeWine released the final Minority Health Strike Force report and the state’s executive response.

The Minority Health Strike Force was formed in April to examine the disproportionate impact of the coronavirus on minority communities, as well as broader health disparities and racial injustices. Currently, African Americans represent 14 percent of Ohio’s population but are 24 percent of positive COVID-19 cases, 32 percent of COVID-19 hospitalizations, and 19 percent of COVID-19 deaths in Ohio. Similarly, at least 6 percent of those who have tested positive for COVID-19 in Ohio are Latino, despite only representing 3.9 percent of Ohio’s population.

The COVID-19 Minority Health Strike Force Blueprint lists 34 recommendations on dismantling racism, removing public health obstacles, improving the social/economic and physical environments, and strengthening data collection to better track disparities.

In response to the Strike Force’s report, Governor DeWine issued Ohio’s Executive Response: A Plan of Action to Advance Equity. The action plan outlines efforts to reinforce the DeWine Administration’s commitment to advancing health equity and establishing Ohio as a model for justice, equity, opportunity, and resilience.

As part of his commitment to equity, Governor DeWine also announced the creation of the new Ohio Governor’s Equity Advisory Board.

The Board will work to improve Ohio’s work to dismantle racism and promote health equity. Board members will draw on the expertise within Ohio’s communities of color and will represent diverse viewpoints from sectors like education, healthcare, public and private business, community organizations, and members of the criminal justice community.

Update August 7, 2020 5:45 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for this week.   There are a total of 8,953 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 401-573.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health today.

Update August 6, 2020 7:45 PM

Lakewood Announces Second Round of  Small Business Rent Relief Grant Program
Program Applications Beginning August 6th for Grants up to $7,000

The City of Lakewood announced the second round of its popular Small Business Rent Relief grant program today. Applications will be accepted starting August 6th and are available at http://www.onelakewood.com/rent-relief-program/.

Mayor Meghan George said, “My administration created this program in the early days of the quarantine back in March to ensure City resources were being granted to the small business community in a direct, streamlined, and useful way. I am pleased to announce more resources are available and we are adjusting the eligibility of the program to reach applicants who may not have qualified during our initial rollout but are in dire need, like so many businesses in our community.”

The City of Lakewood’s Small Business Relief Program provides emergency assistance to income-eligible Lakewood small businesses that have experienced a reduction in revenue as a result of the current public health emergency. Assistance is up to $7,000 per business to cover rent and eligible payroll expenses.

Applications will be accepted until all funds have been awarded. Funds for the second round of the Small Business Relief Program were made available in recent weeks through CARES Act funds from the federal government.

Shawn Leininger, Director of Planning for the City of Lakewood, said, “This program was a clear demonstration of a city government’s commitment to its local small businesses. Now that Mayor George has asked not only to continue the program due to its incredible demand, but to expand the program and its eligibility requirements. I cannot imagine many other cities in the region or state who are doing as much as the City of Lakewood to support small businesses in their greatest time of need. My department has been working tirelessly to deliver these resources to those in our City who need them.”

The City of Lakewood will make $445,870 available for this round of small business grants. The City issued $187,492.92 in grants during the initial phase of the Small Business Rent Relief grant program to 118 small businesses in Lakewood, completed May 5, 2020.

“We understood at the very beginning of this pandemic that the public health crisis was the front end of the equation—the economic fallout would be severe. Lakewood is so proud of its small businesses and Shop Local mentality. It is what makes us who we are. As vibrant as our small business community is, they are acutely vulnerable to the kind of disruption or total shutdown that has resulted from the coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic. I want to do everything within the power of the Mayor’s Office to support our small businesses. I’m grateful yet again for the support of our partners, LakewoodAlive and the Lakewood Chamber of Commerce, for their roles in making this happen for Lakewood small businesses,” Mayor Meghan George said.

While the first round of the Small Business Rent Relief grant program in spring 2020 focused on businesses that line Lakewood’s commercial corridors, funds announced for the second round will reimburse for expenses during the period of April 1, 2020 through August 1, 2020 and will have the following criteria:

  • Be physically located in the City of Lakewood
  • Be in good standing with the City of Lakewood (i.e. no tax delinquencies)
  • Have been established prior to January 1, 2020
  • Employ five or fewer employees, including the business owner (combined hours cannot exceed 200 per week)
  • Rent a retail or commercial space and may not own or have an ownership interest in the building (home based businesses are not eligible)
  • The businessowner must meet HUD income eligibility criteria

Ian Andrews, Executive Director of LakewoodAlive, said, “Small business is big business in Lakewood and our local entrepreneurs have been dealt a massive blow due to COVID-19, not just in sales but in the health and safety of their guests, staff, and significantly-altered supply chains. Lakewood’s second rent relief program, funded by Congress with federal rules, will support our smallest businesses as they struggle to remain open. LakewoodAlive is proud to partner with the City to help small businesses work their way through this process in order to pay one of their biggest fixed costs.”

For more information on the Small Business Rent Relief grant program and other Business Emergency Resources, visit http://www.onelakewood.com/covid19businessresources/For assistance with your application, contact LakewoodAlive at iandrews@lakewoodalive.org or contact the Planning & Development Department via email at planning@lakewoodoh.net.

Update August 6, 2020 7:30 PM

City of Lakewood Offers Residential Rent Relief–Eligible Residents Can Apply for Rent Assistance

The City of Lakewood announced today a new Residential Rent Relief grant program in response to the coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic. Residents who meet the program’s eligibility requirements can find the application at http://www.onelakewood.com/residential-rent-assistance-program/.

Mayor Meghan George said, “Lakewood’s residents are our most important asset. Many are struggling to make ends meet. We are still waiting for our state and federal leaders to provide us all with the relief we need, but, in the interim, some federal dollars have reached us and I am pleased to offer this unique grant program to support our residents.”

The City of Lakewood is utilizing approximately $1.5 million in CARES Act funding received from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. These funds are available to prevent housing instability and displacement among low-moderate income Lakewood tenants who are unable to pay their rent due to pandemic-related economic hardships. The program is being administered in conjunction with Cuyahoga County by CHN Housing Partners and Lakewood Community Services Center (LCSC), two nonprofit organizations addressing our region’s most critical housing needs.

Shawn Leininger, Director of Planning for the City of Lakewood, said, “We are so fortunate in Lakewood to have the resources to help our residents, partners like CHN and LCSC with the experience to support the application and screening process, and a leader like Mayor George who can bring those pieces together.”

The Residential Rent Assistance Program provides rental assistance, retroactive to April 1, 2020, to Lakewood tenants who are income-eligible according to HUD 2020 Income Guidelines. All rent payments will be made directly to landlords on the tenant’s behalf.

Trish Rooney, Executive Director of LCSC, said, “LCSC and the City of Lakewood have worked in partnership for many years to ensure that low-moderate income residents remain in safe and appropriate housing. The city’s Residential Rent Relief program funds will go a long way toward preventing evictions and providing housing stability for our community’s most vulnerable residents.”

For more information on the Residential Rent Relief grant program and other resources, visit http://www.onelakewood.com/coronavirus/ or contact the Planning & Development Department via email at planning@lakewoodoh.net.

Update August 4, 2020 7:30 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on the status of the state’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

MASKS IN SCHOOLS

Governor DeWine announced today that the Ohio Department of Health will issue a health order requiring that K-12 children wear face coverings while at school. The new mandate comes after the Ohio Children’s Hospital Association and American Academy of Pediatrics Ohio Chapter issued a joint letter today recommending widespread use of masks in schools with the following exceptions:

  1. Children under the age of 2 years old
  2. Any child unable to remove the face covering without assistance
  3. A child with a significant behavioral/psychological issue undergoing treatment that is exacerbated specifically by the use of a facial covering (e.g. severe anxiety or a tactile aversion)
  4. A child living with severe autism or with extreme developmental delay who may become agitated or anxious wearing a mask
  5. A child with a facial deformity that causes airway obstruction

RAPID TESTING MULTI-STATE PURCHASING AGREEMENT

Governor DeWine announced that Ohio is entering into a multi-state purchasing agreement with Maryland, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Virginia to expand the use of rapid point-of-care tests.

More rapid point-of-care testing will help Ohio detect outbreaks sooner with faster turnaround time, expand testing in congregate settings, and make testing more accessible for the most high-risk and hard-hit communities.

COMMUNITY SPREAD

Governor DeWine today also continued to warn Ohioans about community spread connected to informal gatherings between family and friends.

New data compiled by the Ohio Department of Health shows the amount of community spread per county over the past two weeks.

LETTER TO FAITH-BASED COMMUNITY

Governor DeWine today announced that he will send a letter to Ohio’s faith-based community to share important health information with Ohio churches, synagogues, and mosques and to share ways to better protect their worshipers.

One case study shows that a man with COVID-19 attended a church service in Ohio, and following that service, 91 additional people from five counties developed symptoms.

Dr. AMY ACTON:

Governor DeWine announced that Dr. Amy Acton, Ohio’s former director of the Ohio Department of Health, has decided to leave state employment and return to her role at the Columbus Foundation, where she worked previously.

Update August 4, 2020 10:00 AM

City of Lakewood Passes Mask Resolution

Last night, City Council passed a resolution establishing a face mask mandate for the City of Lakewood, which Mayor George signed. “This legislation is another important step to combat the spread of COVID-19. Lakewood is leading the way in enacting impactful legislation to ensure that we are doing everything we can to prevent the spread of this disease or another economic shutdown. Either outcome would be devastating to Lakewood and both can be prevented by wearing masks and practicing proper social distancing,” Mayor George said.

City Council President Dan O’Malley said, “I’m happy that Lakewood’s administration, City Council, businesses, and residents worked together to produce a resolution that will clarify our rules and protect the health of our citizens. We will now be able to enforce these important mandates locally and ensure that our businesses operate safely.”

The new resolution was introduced on July 20th and requires Lakewood establishments that have onsite consumption of food, beer, wine and liquor to comply with Governor DeWine’s statewide social distancing rules.  All customers must be seated, with tables limited to no more than 10 persons. Individuals must maintain six-foot social distancing at all times—including customers waiting in line.

Mayor George said, “One of the most contentious portions of the initial version of the legislation was a proposed occupancy reduction. We listened to our small business community and I sent a substitute ordinance to City Council removing the occupancy limit, replacing it with a codification mirroring the Governor’s order which accomplished our goal of additional enforcement measures for our safety forces.”

The new resolution requires people to wear masks in Lakewood during any of the following circumstances:

  1. In any indoor location that is not a residence, including common areas of apartment buildings and condominiums;
  2. When outdoors and unable to consistently maintain a distance of six feet or more from individuals who are not members of their household; or
  3. Waiting for, riding, driving, or operating public transportation, a taxi, a private car service, or a ride sharing vehicle. This does not apply to private or rental vehicles where members of a family are sharing a vehicle.

This resolution shall remain in effect so long as Governor DeWine’s statewide mandate to wear face coverings remains in effect. “Face covering” includes any material covering an individual’s nose, mouth, and chin.

This City of Lakewood resolution also has several exceptions. People in Lakewood are not required to wear a mask under the following circumstances:

  1. The individual is under the age of 10;
  2. A medical condition, including those with respiratory conditions that restrict breathing, mental health conditions, or disability contraindicates the wearing of a facial covering;
  3. The individual is communicating or seeking to communicate with someone who is hearing-impaired or has another disability, where the ability to see the mouth is essential for communication;
  4. The individual is alone or in an enclosed space, such as an office, and which space is not intended for use or access to the public;
  5. The individual is actively engaged in exercise in a gym or indoor facility so long as six or more feet of separation between individuals exists;
  6. The individual is actively participating in athletic practice, scrimmage, or competition that is permitted under an Ohio Department of Health Order;
  7. The individual is actively engaged in a public safety activity, including but not limited to law enforcement, firefighters or emergency medical personnel;
  8. The individual is seated and actively consuming food or beverages in a restaurant or bar;
  9. Facial coverings are prohibited by law or regulation;
  10. Facial coverings are in violation of documented industry standards;
  11. Facial coverings are in violation of a businesses documented safety policies;
  12. The individual is actively participating in broadcast communications; or
  13. The individual is an officiant of a religious service.

Mayor George said, “These requirements and exceptions mirror Governor DeWine’s health orders. Also, this resolution enables the City to better enforce these rules. Without this legislation, the enforcement mechanisms remain with other overwhelmed governmental entities, such as the Cuyahoga County Board of Health and the Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Office. Lakewood’s safety forces now have the ability to nuisance a business owner who is not abiding by the Governor’s Order and our legislation.”

Cuyahoga County remains in Level 3–RED Public Emergency status according to the State of Ohio’s Public Health Advisory System, featuring “very high exposure and spread.”

Update July 31, 2020 2:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for this week.   There are a total of 8,307 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 371-543.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health today.

Update July 30, 2020 4:30 PM

Governor Mike DeWine today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine released this week’s new Ohio Public Health Advisory System map.

Remaining at Level 3:

  • Allen
  • Cuyahoga
  • Erie
  • Fairfield
  • Franklin
  • Hamilton
  • Licking
  • Lucas
  • Henry
  • Lawrence
  • Marion
  • Medina
  • Montgomery
Downgraded from
Level 3 to Level 2: 

  • Clark
  • Defiance
  • Hardin
  • Athens
  • Clermont
  • Delaware
  • Pickaway
  • Scioto
  • Union
Downgraded to from
Level 3 to Level 1:

  • Richland

There are no counties on Ohio’s Watch List.

Detailed data on all 88 counties are now available on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website. The system was developed to provide local health departments, community leaders, and the public with data and information on the severity of the COVID-19 spread in the counties in which they live. The system consists of four levels with specific risk-level guidelines. Each level is calculated with data gathered on seven public health indicators.

ALCOHOL SALE AND ON-PREMISES CONSUMPTION LIMITS

Governor DeWine announced today that he has asked the Ohio Liquor Control Commission to call an emergency meeting to consider enacting a statewide emergency rule to limit liquor sales at establishments that serve alcohol for on-site consumption.

The rule would prevent the sale of alcohol at these liquor-permitted establishments beginning at 10:00 p.m. each night. On-premises consumption must end by 11:00 p.m. Businesses may stay open, and establishments that sell food can continue serving meals until closing.

Governor DeWine requested the new administrative rule after seeing outbreaks associated with bars across Ohio including Toledo, Cleveland, and Columbus.

Separately, Governor DeWine is also asking the commission to raise the number of liquor and mixed drinks permitted to be purchased for carryout with a meal from two drinks to three drinks.

The Ohio Liquor Control Commission will hold its emergency meeting tomorrow at 9:00 a.m. If the emergency administrative rule is approved, Governor DeWine will sign an executive order making it effective tomorrow night.  Click here for the signed order.

MASS GATHERING ORDER

Governor DeWine announced that Ohio will separate its mass gathering guidance into its own order. Mass gathering guidance was most recently referenced as part of other orders, and combining this information into a stand-alone order will allow citizens to easily find guidance on holding gatherings in a safe manner.

Mass gatherings in Ohio remain limited to 10 people.

The order will still permit Ohioans to go to work, worship, go to school, and acquire goods and services, however, this order will offer clear recommendations on safely holding gatherings.

  • Gatherings at a household or family residence should be limited to close friends and family and are recommended to be 10 visitors or less.
  • Residents in a red or purple county, as designated by the Ohio Public Health Advisory System, should limit hosting or attending gatherings of any size.
  • Wear a mask at all times at gatherings and maintain physical distance.
  • Use take out, outdoor dining, or indoor dining only when strict social distancing can be maintained.
  • Take extra precautions if you go to bars or nightclubs, where use of masks typically is inconsistent and drinking alcohol can lead to less social distancing.
  • Protect anyone with serious medical conditions at home by social distancing at home, wearing a mask, and using high levels of personal hygiene.
  • High-risk individuals should take extra precautions to limit the number of people they interact with.
  • Make the group of people you interact with most often as small as possible and make sure that they are taking appropriate COVID-19 precautions – even if you are just gathering with family friends or neighbors at your home.

Update July 30, 2020 1:30 PM

“COVID-19: A Lakewood Community Update” Virtual Conversation Planned For August 6th

Mayor George will be an panelist at the LakewoodAlive free webinar presentation – entitled COVID-19: A Lakewood Community Update – on Thursday, August 6, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.   This webinar will provide a local update on the pandemic and discuss what Lakewoodites can do to protect themselves during this period of uncertainty.

Coordinated in conjunction with the City of Lakewood, Cleveland Clinic Lakewood Family Health Center and Cuyahoga County Board of Health, this community conversation will explore where Lakewood and Cuyahoga County stand with regards to COVID-19 and the steps being taken to address the pandemic.  Topics will range from best practices for keeping our families healthy to enforcement of state safety mandates to balancing health and economic needs for our community.

Ian Andrews, Executive Director of LakewoodAlive, will serve as moderator.  Panelists for this webinar consist of:

Cuyahoga County Board of Health
Terry Allan – Health Commissioner

City of Lakewood
Meghan F. George – Mayor

Cleveland Clinic Lakewood Family Health Center
Dr. James Hekman, MD – Medical Director

Members of the Lakewood community are invited to participate by registering here.  Space for attending this webinar is limited to 100 people, and those interested in participating are urged to register ahead of time.  Questions will be taken from audience members.  A recording of this presentation will be shared at a later date.

Update July 29, 2020 9:30 AM

At his press conference yesterday, Governor Mike DeWine provided the following updates related to Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

CHILD CARE RATIOS

Governor DeWine announced that child care providers in Ohio may return to their normal, statutory ratios and class sizes beginning on August 9, 2020.

Child care providers have a choice to increase the number of children and staff members to the normal statutory ratios or to maintain their current, lower ratios to help slow the spread of COVID-19. The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) is structuring a financial incentive to providers that maintain smaller ratios and classroom sizes.

All child care providers must comply with stringent health and safety requirements including:

  • Face coverings for all staff and children over 10, unless they have a health exemption;
  • Symptom and temperature checks when staff and children arrive;
  • Washing hands throughout the day, including upon arrival and before departure;
  • Frequent cleaning of high-touch surfaces; and
  • Regular deep cleanings.

Additionally, providers must report any COVID-19 cases to ODJFS and their local health department.

COUNTY AND INDEPENDENT FAIRS

Governor DeWine announced today that county and independent fairs with an opening day on or after July 31, 2020, will be limited to specific junior fair events.

Junior fair activities such as livestock competitions and 4-H and Future Farmers of America competitions for kids and teenagers may continue as planned, but junior fairs must develop a plan that reduces crowding in barns, such as limiting entrance to only the immediate family of those actively showing their animals or projects. A 10 p.m. curfew will also be instituted for the barns, buildings, and midways.

Harness racing can proceed with no spectators, but rides, games, and grandstand events will be prohibited to limit crowds and better prevent coronavirus spread.

Update July 28, 2020 2:30 PM

Update July 24, 2020 3:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for this week.   There are a total of 7,512 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 330-509.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health today.

Update July 24, 2020 8:30 AM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine announced today that new public health data has led the Ohio Department of Health to designate 23 counties as being in a Red Alert Level 3 Public Emergency as defined by the Ohio Public Health Advisory System.

Upgraded to Level 3:

  • Clark
  • Defiance
  • Erie
  • Hardin
  • Henry
  • Lawrence
  • Marion
  • Medina
Continuing at Level 3: 

  • Athens
  • Allen*
  • Clermont
  • Cuyahoga
  • Delaware
  • Fairfield
  • Franklin
  • Hamilton
  • Licking
  • Lucas
  • Montgomery
  • Pickaway
  • Richland
  • Scioto
  • Union
Downgraded to Level 2:

  • Butler
  • Lorain
  • Summit
  • Wood

Detailed information on each Red Alert Level 3 county can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website. The system was developed to provide local health departments, community leaders, and the public with data and information on the severity of the COVID-19 spread in the counties in which they live. The system consists of four levels with specific risk-level guidelines. Each level is calculated with data gathered on seven public health indicators.

Ohio’s statewide mask order went into effect at 6:00 PM last night.  Click here to read the order.

IMPORTANCE OF SELF-QUARANTINES

Following an outbreak at an Ohio long-term care facility in which more than two dozen residents and staff tested positive for COVID-19, Governor DeWine continued to encourage Ohioans to self-quarantine for 14-days after traveling to high-risk areas.

Contact tracing found that the long-term care facility’s outbreak occurred due to a group of people who traveled to a high-risk area outside of Ohio and became sick upon return. Members of the group did not isolate and spread the virus into the nursing facility.

“When we look at the way this virus is progressing, we have to do everything we can to stop it in its tracks, and that may mean deferring a vacation so you’re not putting yourself or your friends and family at risk,” said Governor DeWine. “This may mean that you need to stay home from work, but these are critical sacrifices that we are calling on all Ohioans to make when necessary.”

BROADBAND EXPANSION

Lt. Governor Jon Husted today announced the next steps in OhioBroadband’s plans to expand broadband access across the state.

In an effort to provide schools with the ability to search, review and compare prices for purchasing hotspots and equipment, a Request for Information (RFI) will be issued to internet providers for everything from hotspots to laptops to tablets.

Respondents to the RFI will need to provide the specific equipment they have available, number of units available, price, and amount of time it would take to implement an order. This RFI will be specific to K-12 plans and will be housed in a single location, giving every school district a chance to compare what is available and make the best decision for their district and their students.

Additionally, pending upcoming Controlling Board approval, schools can apply for a dollar to dollar matching grant program with the state for hotspots, in-home internet, and internet-enabled devices to students. This funding will be facilitated through the federal CARES Act and will total $50 million. Schools will have the flexibility to use the funding through a connectivity plan that makes the most sense for their student population and district.

The Lt. Governor also announced the launch of a new E-Permitting system through InnovateOhio and the Ohio Department of Transportation. The new system fulfills a goal outlined in the December 2019, Ohio Broadband Strategy, and replaces a paper-only right-of-way permitting system with an online process that is more convenient for permit requesters and is expected to reallocate 24,000 hours of labor per year.

Update July 23, 2020 9:00 AM

STATEWIDE MASK ORDER

Governor DeWine announced that beginning on Thursday, July 23, at 6:00 p.m., a statewide mask mandate will go into effect for citizens living in all 88 Ohio counties.

All individuals in Ohio must wear facial coverings in public at all times when:

  • At an indoor location that is not a residence
  • Outdoors, but unable to maintain six-foot social distance from people who are not household members
  • Waiting for, riding, driving, or operating public transportation, such as a taxi, a car service, or a private car used for ride-sharing.

The order only requires those 10 years old or older to wear a mask. Additional exclusions include:

  • Those with a medical condition or a disability or those communicating with someone with a disability;
  • Those who are actively exercising or playing sports;
  • Those who are officiants at religious services;
  • Those who are actively involved in public safety; or
  • Those who are actively eating or drinking.

Schools should follow the guidance previously issued pertaining to masks.

STATEWIDE TRAVEL WARNING

Governor DeWine announced today a travel advisory for all individuals coming into Ohio from states reporting positive COVID-19 testing rates of 15 percent or higher.

Those traveling from one of the following states should self-quarantine for 14 days at home or in a hotel.

  • Alabama
  • Arizona
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Idaho
  • Mississippi
  • Nevada
  • South Carolina
  • Texas

The self-quarantine recommendation applies to those who live in Ohio and to people who are traveling into Ohio from any of these states.

Ohio’s positivity rate, which is an indicator of the percentage of people who have tested positive for COVID-19, has been around 6.2 percent.

Visit coronavirus.ohio.gov for tips on how to effectively quarantine.

INFORMAL GATHERINGS

Governor DeWine today urged citizens to use extreme caution when considering attending or hosting an informal gathering.

“We are seeing serious exposures to the virus that are arising from everyday events like church services, small house parties, neighborhood get-togethers, children’s sleepovers, weddings, and even bridal showers,” said Governor DeWine. “This virus is real, and we cannot let our guards down.”

COUNTY FAIRS

Following a 19-case outbreak linked to a county fair in Ohio, Governor DeWine today spoke with fair managers from across Ohio to stress the importance of following safety guidance during county fair events.

Guidance for fairs is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

CONGRESSIONAL LETTER

Lt. Governor Husted today announced that Governor DeWine has signed onto a letter to Congressional leadership with 20 other fellow Governors from across the nation, calling for reasonable limited liability protections for businesses, schools, healthcare workers, and governments as they are reopened during the COVID-19 global pandemic.

The letter calls for predictable, timely, targeted liability protections to shield employers from legal risks associated with the spread of the novel coronavirus, so long as they are following the appropriate standards of care to protect their employees, customers, and students. The letter specifically requests that the protections be drawn in a narrow fashion as to not give license for gross negligence, misconduct, or recklessness.

Similar calls for liability protection have been made by Ohio’s leading business organizations. In addition to Governor DeWine, the letter was co-signed by the Governors of Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

DROPPING UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

In the first press conference since Ohio’s latest unemployment figures were released, Lt. Governor Husted also highlighted Ohio’s strengthening economy as the state responsibly restarts in the midst of the pandemic. Ohio’s unemployment rate dropped three percentage points in the last month to 10.9%. The Lt. Governor also highlighted how Ohio companies continue to go to great lengths to support their employees and customers.

HOSPITAL INDICATORS

Beginning with tomorrow’s updated Ohio Public Health Advisory System map, Governor DeWine announced that the ICU indicator will be enhanced to address concerns in the event ICU levels increase due to reasons other than COVID-19.

The indicator will trigger if ICU capacity for a county’s hospital region exceeds 80 percent of normal capacity and if 20 percent of the normal ICU capacity is being used for COVID-19 positive patients.

The Ohio Public Health Advisory System will also be updated in the coming weeks to include more localized testing data and an indicator related to known contacts spreading the virus when such local data is widely available.

NEW PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS

The Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation will sponsor two new public service announcements created in partnership with the Ohio Restaurant Association, OhioHealth, JobsOhio, and the Ohio Business Roundtable.

The first PSA features real Ohioans explaining why all Ohioans should all wear a mask.

The second PSA features Dr. Steve Markovich, a former Air National Guardsman and fighter pilot, who is CEO of OhioHealth. He encourages younger adults to wear masks to protect family, friends, and coworkers.

Update July 17, 2020 2:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for this week.   There are a total of 6,674 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 205-296.

Click here to see the full report issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health today.

Update July 17, 2020 11:00 AM

At their press conference on July 16th, Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine announced today that new public health data has led the Ohio Department of Health to designate 19 counties as being in a Red Alert Level 3 Public Emergency as defined by the Ohio Public Health Advisory System.

Upgraded to Level 3:

  • Athens*
  • Allen
  • Delaware
  • Licking
  • Lucas
  • Richland
  • Scioto
  • Union
Continuing at Level 3: 

  • Butler
  • Clermont
  • Cuyahoga
  • Fairfield
  • Franklin
  • Hamilton
  • Lorain
  • Montgomery
  • Pickaway
  • Summit
  • Wood
Downgraded to Level 2:

  • Trumbull

Athens County is also on Ohio’s Watch List because it is closely nearing Purple Alert Level 4. Butler, Cuyahoga, and Hamilton counties were removed from the Watch List but the threat of exposure and spread remains high.

New counties upgraded to Red Alert Level 3 will be mandated to begin wearing masks in public beginning at 6 p.m. on July 17, 2020. Mask mandates will remain in effect in all counties continuing in Red Alert Level 3. Residents in Trumbull County are no longer required to wear masks in public, however, they are strongly encouraged to do so.

“As of tomorrow night at 6:00, nearly 60 percent of Ohio’s population will be under a mask order, and I strongly encourage citizens living in other counties to wear masks in public as well,” said Governor DeWine.

Detailed information on each Red Alert Level 3 county can be found on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System’s website. The system was developed to provide local health departments, community leaders, and the public with data and information on the severity of the COVID-19 spread in the counties in which they live. The system consists of four levels with specific risk-level guidelines. Each level is calculated with data gathered on seven public health indicators.

EXECUTIVE ORDER

Governor DeWine today signed an executive order to extend and improve emergency rules that will provide additional flexibilities to allow health care professionals to deliver services via telehealth.

Through the emergency rules, the executive order permits the use of audio, video, and even text messaging to allow people to access critical health care services while remaining socially distant and safe. This rule will apply to a variety of healthcare services, including critical mental health and addiction services.

PPE RETOOLING AND RESHORING GRANTS

Lt. Governor Husted announced today that Ohio Development Services Agency awarded $20 million in grants to 68 Ohio manufacturers to produce personal protective equipment (PPE) and help ensure the safety of Ohioans during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Ohio PPE Retooling and Reshoring grants provide up to $500,000 to small and medium-sized manufacturers to expand production or convert their facility to start producing PPE including cleaning and sanitizing products, community dividers, components for ventilators, masks, face shields, gloves, gowns, hand sanitizer, nasal swabs, surgical masks, and thermometers.

The projects are expected to create 829 new jobs and retain 1,133 existing jobs.  More than half of the awards will help small businesses with less than 25 employees. Grant funds can be used to retool or expand existing facilities in Ohio, construct new facilities, purchase equipment, or upgrade technology.  Projects must be complete by December 31, 2020.

Ohio small businesses can learn more about other resources available through Office of Small Business Relief and Development at www.Coronavirus.Ohio.Gov/BusinessHelp.

PPE DISTRIBUTION:

The Lt. Governor also announced that to date, Ohio has procured approximately 65 million pieces of PPE. This includes various types of face masks and shields, gloves, gowns, coveralls, and thermometers. Though not PPE, the Ohio Department of Administrative Services (DAS) also ordered 1,000 ventilators. This includes purchases by the Department of Public Safety and the Ohio Emergency Management Agency, DAS, and the Department of Health.

As of today, more than 50 million pieces of this PPE have been distributed across the state.

In addition to large and small companies, groups, and citizens who donated PPE, JobsOhio has been a consistent partner in this effort, allocating nearly $70 million for more than 40 million units of lifesaving PPE.

Next week, in an effort to help Ohio’s small businesses and their workers operate in a safe environment, JobsOhio and its six network partners will distribute 15,000 PPE toolkits, for a total of 1.5 million 3-ply masks, 150,000 KN95 masks, and 15,000 bottles of hand sanitizer. This initiative brings together partners at the local level as well as partners in the chamber of commerce and urban leagues across the state. These kits have already been allocated to small businesses across the state.

Update July 16, 2020 8:00 AM

In a statewide address from the Statehouse last night Governor DeWine said that the state is at a critical point in the COVID-19 pandemic and implored Ohioans to take appropriate action to reverse the rapidly increasing spread of the virus.

“Today, more Ohioans are getting sick than at any previous point in this pandemic. We are sliding down a very dangerous path, with our once flattened-curve starting to sharpen and spike,” said Governor DeWine. “This is a worrisome, disturbing reversal of our progress — a jarring reminder of just how quickly our fate can change.”

Governor DeWine commended Ohioans for doing their part at the beginning of the pandemic. However, with positive cases increasing, he reminded Ohioans that the choices they make today will impact the spread of the virus in the coming weeks. During the speech, grounded in scientific evidence and data, Governor DeWine reminded Ohioans about the efficacy of facial coverings to protect themselves, loved ones, friends, neighbors and other citizens. He also renewed the call to socially distance and limit public gatherings.

“I am calling on all Ohioans to once again unite. We must work together, support each other, and help each other through this challenging time. I’ve seen you do this. I know you can do this. Ohioans can continue to help our most vulnerable, while also protecting ourselves and our families. Together, we can be the Ohio where our hospitals are not overwhelmed, where our schools can open, where sports can start, and where our economy can continue to grow, Governor DeWine added.

A video of the address is available on the Ohio Channel’s YouTube page.
For more information about Covid-19, including testing locations, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Update July 10, 2020 2:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers for this week.   There are a total of 5,761 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 172-255.

Click here to see the full update given by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health today.

Update July 10, 2020 10:00 AM

Governor  DeWine and Lt. Governor  Husted yesterday provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATED COUNTY RISK LEVELS

Governor DeWine announced today that new public health data has led the Ohio Department of Health to designate 12 counties as being in a Red Alert Level 3 Public Emergency as defined by the Ohio Public Health Advisory System.

Upgraded to Level 3:

  • Clermont
  • Fairfield
  • Lorain
  • Pickaway
  • Summit
  • Wood
Continuing at Level 3: 

  • Butler*
  • Cuyahoga*
  • Franklin
  • Hamilton*
  • Montgomery
  • Trumbull
Downgraded to Level 2:

  • Huron

Three Red Alert Level 3 counties marked with a star (*) are on Ohio’s Watch List as they are approaching Purple Alert Level 4. Franklin County was removed from the Watch List due to a decrease in hospital admissions.

Mask mandates for the new counties upgraded to Red Alert Level 3 will be mandated to begin wearing masks in public beginning at 6 p.m. on July 10, 2020. Residents in Huron County are no longer required to wear a mask in public, however, they are strongly encouraged to do so.

Governor DeWine announced the creation of the Ohio Public Health Advisory System last week to provide local health departments, community leaders, and the public with data and information on the severity of the COVID-19 spread in the counties in which they live. The system consists of four levels with specific risk-level guidelines. Each level is calculated with data gathered on seven public health indicators.

HIGHER EDUCATION GUIDANCE:

The Ohio Department of Higher Education, in consultation with Ohio colleges, universities, the Ohio Department of Health, and health experts across the state have developed guidance to help campuses safely reopen.

The Responsible RestartOhio guidance for Institutions of Higher Education includes minimum operating standards for all campuses, as well as best practices to further enhance those standards.

Because each campus must develop policies and procedures related to COVID-19 testing, new Guidance for COVID-19 Testing at Institutions of Higher Education was also released to help institutions tailor their testing plan to their community and develop policies related to the isolation of symptomatic students, faculty, and staff members.

K-12 AND HIGHER EDUCATION FUNDING: 

To help K-12 schools and institutions of higher education address increasing costs associated with the COVID-19 safety measures, Governor DeWine and leaders of the Ohio General Assembly are requesting that the Ohio Controlling Board approve an initial request on Monday to allocate $200 million for higher education and $100 million for K-12 schools from the Coronavirus Relief Fund.

“This funding comes from federal CARES Act dollars to help schools meet their unique individual needs,” said Governor DeWine. “We intend for this funding to be very flexible to prevent the spread of COVID-19.”

The funding would be available to all public and private schools and for all two and four-year colleges and universities, both public and private, including adult career tech providers.

The funding request is in addition to the more than $440 million in direct federal CARES Act funding that Ohio K-12 schools are receiving and the more than $190 million in direct federal funding provided to Ohio’s colleges and universities.

HOMELESSNESS GRANT: 

Governor DeWine announced that he is awarding an additional grant of $15 million to the Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio.

The funds will be used to support homelessness prevention efforts and rapidly rehouse individuals and families experiencing homelessness who could be at greater risk of contracting COVID-19, especially those in congregate facilities such as homeless shelters.

The grant funding is in addition to a $1 million grant that Governor DeWine award the coalition in April which helped to keep hundreds of Ohioans safely housed during the pandemic.

IMAP LAUNCH:

Lt. Governor Husted announced the launch of the Individual Micro-credential Assistance Program (IMAP) which will provide $2.5 million in grants to help unemployed Ohioans earn in-demand, technology-focused credentials that will give them a leg up in finding a job in the increasingly tech-focused economy.

The grant application is open to training providers, such as universities, colleges, Ohio technical centers, or private sector training businesses. Training providers who receive awards will be reimbursed up to $3,000 for each completed technology-focused credential issued and up to $250,000 per provider.

The program was created in partnership with the Ohio House of Representatives.

Training providers interested in applying can find more information at IMAP.Development.Ohio.gov. The deadline to apply is July 24, 2020.

SHAREDWORK PROGRAM: 

Governor DeWine recently signed an executive order enabling the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) to use federal funding authorized under the CARES Act to enhance the state’s SharedWork program.

Participating employers agree to reduce the affected employees’ hours by a uniform percentage, between 10 percent and 50 percent, for up to 52 weeks. In return, those employees receive SharedWork compensation (which is a prorated unemployment benefit) and, while federally available, may also receive the Pandemic Unemployment Compensation benefit each week.

Since March 15, ODJFS has approved 909 employers who have participated in 1,680 SharedWork Ohio plans, benefiting 46,352 participating employees.

For more information visit jfs.ohio.gov/ouio/SharedWorkOhio.

PLASMA DONATION

Lt. Governor Husted encouraged Ohioans who have been fully recovered from COVID-19 for at least two weeks to consider donating plasma.

“Convalescent plasma, which is plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients, is rich in antibodies that could possibly attack the virus that causes COVID-19,” said Lt. Governor Husted. “Although the treatment of COVID-19 patients with convalescent plasma remains in the investigation stage, it shows promise to lessen the severity or shorten the length of COVID-19 and is something that could potentially save lives in our continual fight against the coronavirus.”

For more information or to sign up to donate, visit redcrossblood.org/plasma4covid or contact a local blood donor or plasma collection center.

Update July 8, 2020 2:00 PM

Governor DeWine announced at his press conference yesterday that effective on Wednesday, July 8, 2020, at 6:00 p.m., a new Ohio Department of Health order will mandate face coverings in public in all counties that are designated as a Red Alert Level 3 Public Health Emergency or a Purple Alert Level 4 Public Health Emergency.

Currently, seven counties in Ohio are designated at Red Alert Level 3 which indicates that those in these counties have a very high risk of exposure and spread:

  • Butler County
  • Cuyahoga County
  • Franklin County
  • Hamilton County
  • Huron County
  • Montgomery County
  • Trumbull County

As of today, no counties have reached Purple Alert Level 4, however, Franklin County is approaching this top tier.

Last week, Governor DeWine announced the creation of Ohio’s Public Health Advisory System, which consists of four alert levels that provide Ohioans with guidance as to the severity of COVID-19 spread in the counties in which they live. Each level is calculated based on seven data-driven health indicators.

Those in counties designated as Red Alert Level 3 or Purple Alert Level 4 are required to wear a face covering:

  • In any indoor location that is not a residence;
  • When outdoors and unable to consistently maintain a distance of six feet or more from individuals who are not members of their household; or
  • While waiting for, riding, driving, or operating public transportation, a taxi, a private car service, or a ride-sharing vehicle.

The order does not apply to children under the age of 10 or any other minor who cannot safely wear a face covering. The order also reflects the mask guidance in place for employees and businesses which does not require a person to wear a mask if their physician advises against it, if wearing a mask is prohibited by federal regulation, if communicating with the hearing impaired, when alone in an office or personal workspace, and other similar measures.

Schools that offer Kindergarten through Grade 12 instruction should follow the guidelines set forth last week by the Ohio Department of Education and the Ohio Department of Health.

The Ohio Department of Health will update county rankings every Thursday. Any county that increases to Red Alert Level 3 will automatically be included in the face-covering mandate. Any county that decreases from Red Alert Level 3 to Orange Alert Level 2 will automatically be released from the face-covering requirement.

Click here to read the full face mask order.

At the press conference on July 7th, Lt. Governor Husted announced additional, short-term guidelines to help sports teams continue their efforts to return to play amid the global, COVID-19 pandemic. 

 The Ohio Department of Health has issued a Director’s Order providing guidance through July 15, 2020, for contact sport competitions. Competitive games and tournaments are now permitted for contact sports. During this period, practices and open gyms with another team or club and inter-club/team play are also permitted so long as all teams involved agree to comply with the requirements set forth in the Director’s Order.

Lt. Governor Husted emphasized that this order is extended for a short, trial basis and that the responsibility is with all Ohioans to continue exercising safe practices to slow the spread of COVID-19. Click here to read the order.

Update July 7, 2020 3:30 PM

Governor Mandates Masks in Cuyahoga County

Governor DeWine announced a face mask mandate today from the Ohio Department of Health for “red-alert counties” such as Cuyahoga County, effective tomorrow, July 8th, at 6:00 p.m. This mandate will be in effect for the duration that Cuyahoga County remains in a Level 3 Public Health Emergency.  Masks are required indoors (other than residences) and outdoors when social distancing is not possible. Further details of the mandate will be forthcoming from the Governor’s Office and will be provided.

Additionally, Mayor George and Lakewood City Council have been exploring a local mask mandate.

Update July 3, 2020 4:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers.   There are a total of 4,888 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 154-221.

Click here to see the full update given by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health today.

 

Update July 2, 2020 7:00 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

K-12 SCHOOL GUIDANCE:
Governor DeWine today announced new guidance for resuming school in the fall.

The newly issued guidance report advises schools to vigilantly assess symptoms, wash and sanitize hands to prevent spread, thoroughly clean and sanitize the school environment to limit spread on shared surfaces, practice social distancing, and implement a face coverings policy.

“Just as we have done in the business sector with employees, we are requiring school staff to wear face coverings to reduce the spread of the virus, unless it is unsafe or when doing so could significantly interfere with the learning process. When face coverings aren’t practical, face shields may be considered,” said Governor DeWine. “We strongly recommend that students in 3rd grade and up wear face coverings as well.”

More details on the new school guidance will soon be available on coronavirus.ohio.gov.

To assist schools in their efforts to implement the guidance, the Ohio Department of Education has created a document titled, The Reset and Restart Education Planning Guide for Ohio Schools and Districts, which is designed to help teachers, principals, and administrators with solutions to safety challenges. The document provides resources and information for community decision-makers as they contemplate how to reopen safely.

The guidance announced today was developed in consultation with school superintendents, teachers, parents, the Ohio Federation of Teachers, Ohio Education Association, Ohio Association of Public School Employees, Buckeye Association of School Administrators, Ohio School Boards Association, Ohio Association of School Business Officials, Alliance for High Quality Education, and Ohio Association of Career Tech Education.

Governor DeWine today also committed to working with the Ohio General Assembly on a plan to ensure that federal CARES Act dollars are made available to Ohio’s school districts for unforeseen expenses associated with creating a safe environment.

PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORY ALERT SYSTEM:

Governor DeWine announced today that going forward, Ohio will maintain vital, necessary baseline orders to control the spread of COVID-19 while also implementing a new alert system.

The Ohio Public Health Advisory System will provide local health departments and community leaders data and information to combat flare-ups as they occur in different parts of the state. The system consists of four levels that provide Ohioans with guidance as to the severity of the problem in the counties in which they live.

“Our new Public Health Advisory System will help make clear the very real dangers happening in individual counties across Ohio,” said Governor DeWine. “This is a color-coded system built on a data-driven framework to assess the degree of the virus’ spread and to inform, engage, and empower individuals, businesses, communities, local governments, and others in their response and actions.”

Data Indicators:
A county’s alert level is determined by seven data indicators:

  1. New Cases Per Capita
  2. Sustained Increase in New Cases
  3. Proportion of Cases that Are Not Congregate Cases
  4. Sustained Increase in Emergency Room Visits
  5. Sustained Increase in Outpatient Visits
  6. Sustained Increase in New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions
  7. Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Bed Occupancy

Additional measurements still in development include county-level data on contact tracing, tests per capita, and percent positivity.

Detailed descriptions for each indicator can be found on coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Alert Levels:

Alert Level 1 Public Emergency (Yellow): Baseline level. County has met zero or one indicator. Active exposure and spread. Follow all health orders.

Alert Level 2 Public Emergency (Orange): County has met two or three indicators. Increased exposure and spread. Exercise high degree of caution. Follow all current health orders.

Alert Level 3 Public Emergency (Red): County has met four or five indicators. Very high exposure and spread. Limit Activities as much as possible. Follow all current health orders.

Alert Level 4 Public Emergency (Purple): County has met six or seven indicators. Severe exposure and spread. Only leave home for supplies and services. Follow all current health orders.

Counties that are approaching Alert Level 4 are indicated with a star.

Each alert level includes specific risk-level guidelines, including the requirement that all citizens comply with all health orders.

Profiles for the seven counties currently categorized in Alert Level 3 can be found below and are also available on the new Ohio Public Health Advisory System website.

RESTAURANTS & BARS:
Governor DeWine announced that the Ohio Department of Commerce’s Division of Liquor Control has granted over 300 expansion requests to bars and restaurants to allow patrons more opportunities to enjoy dinner or drinks in a safe environment.

Liquor Control has been working with local jurisdictions to extend liquor permits to outside spaces next to bars, such as parking lots and sidewalks, to expand seating capacity outside to keep patrons socially distanced.

“We encourage owners to continue to work with us and their local governments to come up with creative ways to expand their outdoor seating capacity so that everyone can stay safe and be socially distanced,” said Governor DeWine. “I ask our restaurant and bar owners to continue to insist on social distancing and other efforts to control the spread. This is absolutely vital.”

PRESUMED RECOVERED DATA:

Lt. Governor Husted announced that “Presumed Recovered” is a new data point now reported in Ohio’s COVID-19 data metrics shared on coronavirus.ohio.gov.

“Many have been asking why the number of people recovered isn’t reported and that’s because this data isn’t reported to the Ohio Department of Health, so we don’t have an exact figure,” said Lt. Governor Husted. “However, we can presume what that number is based on the other data we have.”

Ohio’s current presumed-recovered count is 38,987.

Update July 2, 2020 11:00 AM

The most recent issue of the Lakewood Life Community newsletter focuses on sharing important information regarding COVID-19.  It was recently mailed to all Lakewood residents and businesses.

Click here to view the newsletter.

 

 

Update July 1, 2020 2:00 PM

CHN, EDEN Announce Details of COVID-19 Rental Assistance 

Cuyahoga County residents who have lost income due to COVID-19 and need help paying their rent can now call 1-833-377-7368.  They can also apply for assistance online at www.neorenthelp.org.  This is a grant, not a loan, with up to three months of rent paid for those who qualify, based on their household income and need.

 

Eligible households are those earning 120% of Area Median Income or less, which is up to $90,000 in annual income for a family of four.

Eligible applicants will receive up to three months of rental assistance which will be paid directly to the landlord. Priority is given based on criteria such as eviction status, accurate information and complete documentation.

Residents should go online to www.neorenthelp.org in order to apply. They must have specific documentation to qualify.

Required documents include:

  • Verification of COVID-19 related hardship (loss of income, illness or increased expenses)
  • Photo identification for all adults in the home
  • Social Security cards for all household members
  • Proof of income (tax returns, paystubs or fixed income benefit award letter)
  • Lease agreement
  • Proof of citizenship
  • Most recent utility bills (for those also applying for utility assistance)

Incomplete applications cannot be processed.

CHN will also screen applicants for utility assistance programs that may help make their electric, gas and water/sewer bills more affordable. Those who qualify for rental assistance, may be required to attend more in-depth financial counseling, provided by CHN, as a condition for rental assistance.

A hotline has been set up to answer questions. That number is 833-377-RENT (7368). No applications can be taken over the phone. Residents are encouraged to apply online at www.neorenthelp.org. Applications can also be submitted online from a mobile phone. A paper application can be printed out and completed. Those can be emailed to info@neorenthelp.org or left in the rental assistance drop box at CHN’s offices located on the first floor of 2999 Payne Avenue (Room 134).

Update June 30, 2020 3:30 PM

Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Husted provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic on Monday, June 29, 2020.

  • Governor DeWine announced that beginning July 20, 2020, nursing homes are permitted to begin outdoor visitation as long as all safety standards are met. When assessing their readiness to permit outdoor visitation, nursing homes should consider: case status in the surrounding community; case status in the nursing home; staffing levels; access to adequate testing for residents and staff; personal protective equipment supplies; local hospital capacity. The order and related guidance will be made available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.  Questions may also be directed to the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman, an office within the Ohio Department of Aging, at 1-800-282-1206.
  • Governor DeWine announced that he is extending existing health orders through this week as his administration finalizes vital plans to help local schools safely reopen, as well as plans to keep Ohioans healthy and safe. Details on this new phase are anticipated to be released on Thursday.
  • Last week was the first week of increasing COVID-19 hospital utilization in Ohio after over two months of decreasing utilization since late April. From June 21, 2020, to June 27, 2020, Ohio had approximately 500 to 550 total COVID-19 patients in hospitals statewide. This week, there are approximately 650 COVID-19 patients in hospitals statewide.
  • Although COVID-19 utilization in hospitals is increasing, there is still adequate overall capacity available across the state as of today. No region has reached the concern threshold of 80 percent overall utilization for ICU beds, however lessons of recent history in NYC, Houston, and Arizona indicate that this can quickly change.
  • Governor DeWine explained that the increase in positive COVID-19 cases is not fully due to Ohio’s increase in testing. “Ohio’s positivity rate has increased slightly as our testing totals have increased,” said Governor DeWine. “If the spread of this virus remained at a low level, more testing should show a lower positivity. The increase of our positivity rate, even as we are doing more testing, means that we are likely picking up signs of broader community spread.”
  • At the end of May and into early June, Hamilton County had an average of 30 cases per day per 100,000 people. As of this past week, the average new cases per day in Hamilton County increased to approximately 100 cases per 100,000 people. Due to the delayed diagnosis, these numbers may continue to grow for this reporting period.
  • In Montgomery County, there is a noticeable increase in cases over the last month from an average of about 10 cases a day at the end of May to about 40 cases a day in the most recent week. The community is also experiencing early signs that more people are seeking medical care for COVID-19 symptoms. For example, outpatient visits in Montgomery County grew from an average of nearly seven visits per day to 27. For the hospitals in the West Central region, the number of COVID-positive patients in standard hospital beds, ICUs, and ventilators has also doubled since the first week of June. COVID-specific hospital utilization is approaching levels not seen since the earlier peak of the pandemic in April.

Update June 26, 2020 2:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers.   There are a total of 4,260 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 134-195.

Click here to see the full update given by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health today.

 

Update June 24, 2020 3:30 PM

Assisting taxpayers who have notice that their EIP was sent but haven’t received it

Key Points:

Taxpayers can request a trace on their Economic Impact (stimulus) Payment if they haven’t received it and:

  • They have received Notice 1444 telling them the date their EIP was sent, or
  • Get My Payment shows their EIP was issued and it has been more than:

5 days since the scheduled direct deposit date

4 weeks since it was mailed by check to a standard address

6 weeks since it was mailed, and you have a forwarding address on file with the local post office

9 weeks since it was mailed, and you have a foreign address

How to initiate to initiate an EIP payment trace

Q55. How do I request a Payment Trace on my Economic Impact Payment? (added June 19, 2020)

A55. If your payment was issued by direct deposit, your first step is to check with your bank and make sure they didn’t receive a deposit.

You should request a trace on your Payment if you received Notice 1444 or Get My Payment shows your payment was issued on a specific date, but you have not received it and it has been more than:

  • 5 days since the scheduled deposit date
  • 4 weeks since it was mailed by check to a standard address
  • 6 weeks since it was mailed, and you have a forwarding address on file with the local post office
  • 9 weeks since it was mailed, and you have a foreign address

Do not request a Payment trace to determine if you were eligible for a payment, the amount of payment you should have received, or you have not received a Notice 1444 or a payment date from Get My Payment. 

How we process your claim

We will process your claim for a missing payment in one of two ways:

  • If the check was not cashed, we will issue a replacement. If you find the original check, you must return it as soon as possible.
  • If the refund check was cashed, the Bureau of the Fiscal Service (BFS) will send you a claim package that includes a copy of the cashed check. Follow the instructions. BFS will review your claim and the signature on the canceled check before determining whether they can issue you a replacement check.

You will generally receive a response 6 weeks after we receive your request for a Payment trace, but there may be delays due to limited staffing. Get up-to-date status on affected IRS operations and services.

A trace on an Economic Impact Payment (EIP) follows the same process as a trace on a tax refund. To start a Payment trace:

  • Call us at 800-919-9835 (you may experience long wait times or recorded help because our staffing is limited) 

Or

  • Submit a completed Form 3911, Taxpayer Statement Regarding Refund (PDF).
  • If you submit the form and you are Married Filing Jointly, both spouses must sign the form;
  • Write “EIP” on the top of the form and complete Sections I, II and III;
  • Answer the refund questions as they relate to your EIP;
  • When completing Number 7 under Section I, check the box for “Individual” as the Type of return; enter “2020” as the tax period and leave the date filed blank;
  • Mail or fax the form to {see the FAQ for where to mail or fax form 3911}: 

Other FAQs that may help include:

I received Notice 1444 in the mail saying my payment was issued, but I have not received my Payment. What should I do? (updated June 19, 2020)

Get My Payment shows that my Payment was issued but I never received it. How do I get a new one? (added June 9, 2020)

My address has changed or is incorrect. What can I do to change or correct it to receive my Payment? (added June 9, 2020)

My payment was mailed weeks ago but the Post Office was unable to deliver it. What should I do? (added May 28, 2020)

Update June 24, 2020 1:30 PM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic on Tuesday, June 23, 2020.

PUBLIC AWARENESS CAMPAIGNS

Governor DeWine today announced two public awareness campaigns aimed at spreading awareness of COVID-19 prevention measures that impact the well-being of Ohioans and the Ohio economy.

The first campaign, called “I Believe,” focuses on real Ohioans and the prevention measures they take to prevent the spread of COVID-19. These 15-second ads, provided by the Ohio Department of Health, will air for three weeks on broadcast, cable, and social media across the state.

The second campaign, called “Up to All of Us,” focuses on the importance of taking proper preventative precautions, such as maintaining social distance and washing hands, to get Ohioans back to work and Ohio’s economy working again.  The ad, provided by the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation, will air for three weeks on broadcast and cable television and features an emergency room physician and a local restaurant owner and operator.

FIREWORKS: 

Lt. Governor Husted noted today that Independence Day fireworks shows can proceed, but large gatherings are still prohibited at this time. He encouraged any community that plans on holding a fireworks event to do so safely. Spectators are encouraged to find ways to celebrate the Fourth of July in small groups such as by watching displays from their porches, backyards, or cars.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE GRANTS:

Governor DeWine announced the first round of funding being distributed to local criminal justice entities as part of the Coronavirus Emergency Supplemental Funding Grant.

Approximately $2.1 million will be awarded to a total of 65 local criminal justice agencies including law enforcement, probation/parole offices, corrections agencies, courts, and victim service providers.

The funding can be used toward COVID-19 expenses such as cleaning supplies, PPE, and medical supplies like thermometers. The funding will also be used to pay for technology upgrades that are needed for teleworking or other virtual services.

A complete list of today’s grant recipients can be found at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

A total of nearly $16 million was awarded to Ohio’s Office of Criminal Justice Services (OCJS) for this program as part of the CARES Act. OCJS continues to process other grant applications they’ve already received and are still accepting new applications from agencies that have not yet requested funding.

More information on how to apply can be found at www.ocjs.ohio.gov.

 

Update June 23, 2020 10:30 AM

FREE FRESH PRODUCE DISTRIBUTION FOR LAKEWOOD FAMILIES

Update June 22, 2020 10:00 AM

CITY OF LAKEWOOD BUILDING DEPARTMENT – RESPONSE TO COVID-19 PANDEMIC – UPDATE 

In response to the Covid-19 pandemic the City of Lakewood – Division of Housing and Building has implemented the following TEMPORARY POLICIES to help protect the public health and safety until the state of emergency expires:

City Hall is open by appointment.   Should an in-person meeting be required, you are asked to take your temperature before arriving, wear a face covering, and always observe strict social distancing while at City Hall. If your temperature is elevated, or you feel sick you are asked to postpone your meeting. An appointment can be scheduled with adequate advance notice by calling 216-529-6270.

PERMIT APPLICATIONS can be mailed, emailed, faxed or dropped in the Building Department drop box at the main entrance of City Hall:

City of Lakewood
Division of Housing & Building 12650 Detroit Ave.
Lakewood, OH 44107 building.permits@lakewoodoh.net Fax: 216-529-5930

 CONSTRUCTION PLANS with the correct (commercial or residential) plan review application, if less than 25 MB, can be emailed to building.permits@lakewoodoh.net. Plans must be flattened and submitted as full sets; individual pages are NOT acceptable. Larger plan sets with the appropriate application can be placed in the drop box at the main entrance to City Hall. (Note: all information on the application is REQUIRED, if not complete your application can be rejected)

BUILDING DEPARTMENT FORMS can be found at: http://www.onelakewood.com/accordions/building-permit/

PAYMENT can be made by check (call to verify cost) or credit card over the phone.

INSPECTIONS – The Building Department is conducting all necessary construction (permit) inspections within 4 business days. We have implemented a limited remote/virtual inspection program. For details, please refer to: http://www.onelakewood.com/housing-building/. Call your inspector for job specific requirements.

Interior Property Maintenance inspections, including complaint inspections that do not have a life-safety component have been suspended. The Department will resume these inspections when the COVID-19 state of emergency has been lifted. Beginning July 1, 2020 exterior inspections and retail Certificate of Code Compliance inspections will resume.

Update June 19, 2020 1:00 PM

Governor DeWine and Lt. Governor Husted made the following announcments at their press conference on June 18, 2020:

  • Governor DeWine announced that although Ohio is seeing an overall declining number of COVID-19 cases, there is currently an uptick in cases in Southwest Ohio. Increases are being seen in Montgomery County, Greene County, Clark County, Warren County, and Hamilton County. Case counts in these counties by zip code can be found on coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • In response to this increase in cases, Governor DeWine announced that pop-up testing sites will surge into the zip codes with the highest number of cases. Testing at pop-up sites is free, and citizens are not required to live in the community where the pop-up site is located to receive a test. New pop-up testing sites will also be scheduled in other locations to ensure testing accessibility throughout the state.  Click here for a listing of pop-up testing sites.
  • Dr. Amy Edwards, a pediatric infectious disease doctor and associate medical director for infection control at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital in Cleveland, today provided information on an increase in the percentage of children testing positive for COVID-19 at Rainbow Babies. Dr. Edwards said that hospital admissions for COVID-19 in children at Rainbow Babies have also increased. Symptoms of COVID-19 in kids are similar to symptoms in adults. If your child seems to be having trouble breathing or is not eating or drinking, Dr. Edwards recommends calling your pediatrician to get your child tested.
  • Governor DeWine announced the creation of a new Hospital PPE Readiness Stockpile, which will be compiled and stored by Ohio hospitals throughout the state. Items in the PPE stockpile will be distributed to residents and staff at long-term care facilities should there be an increase in COVID-19 cases. Hospitals have begun to build a 30-day reserve of PPE based on several calculations, including the state’s surge models, the number of residents and staff at Ohio nursing homes, as well as recent FEMA PPE allocations to each Ohio nursing home. Each hospital will have a different amount of stockpile that is calculated specifically for the region.  The stockpile is a collaborative effort between the Ohio Hospital Association, hospitals throughout the state, and several state agencies, including the departments of Health, Medicaid, and Public Safety.
  • Governor DeWine signed an executive order that expands the definition of good cause throughout the COVID-19 State of Emergency. Good Cause now includes the following situations:
      • A medical professional recommends that an individual not return to work because that person falls into a category that is considered high-risk for catching COVID-19 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and their employee cannot offer teleworking options.
      • The employee is 65 years of age or older.
      • There is tangible evidence of a health and safety violation by the employer that does not allow the employee to practice social distancing, hygiene, and wearing personal protective equipment.
      • The individual has been potentially exposed to COVID-19 and subject to a quarantine period as prescribed by a medical or health professional.
      • The individual must stay home to care for a family member who is suffering from COVID-19 or subject to a prescribed quarantine period by a medical or health professional.
      • Click here to view the signed order.
  • Lt. Governor Husted announced that because most of Ohio’s economy is now open, the coronavirus.ohio.gov/JobSearch website will transition back to Ohio’s regular job-search website, OhioMeansJobs.comOhioMeansJobs.com currently has over 120,000 job postings, with almost half paying over $50,000. Approximately 76,000 jobs require less than a bachelor’s degree, while 36,000 require either a bachelor’s degree or associate’s degree. Approximately 77 percent of the job openings are considered in-demand.
  • Lt. Governor Husted also announced that Phase II of the Responsible RestartOhio plan for sports activities will allow contact practice for all sports to resume on Monday, June 22nd. The Ohio High School Athletic Association and the summer league work group worked together with the Ohio Department of Health on this plan. Click here to read the guidelines.
  • In a sign that Ohioans are heading back to work, statistics the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) reported to the U.S. Department of Labor today show that for the seventh straight week, continued weekly claims for unemployment benefits have declined. Those who remain jobless filed 287,499 fewer continued claims last week compared to the peak in April.
  • Over the last 13 weeks, ODJFS has distributed more than $4.1 billion in unemployment compensation payments to more than 700,000 claimants. Of the more than 1 million applications the agency has received, more than 94% have been processed, with less than 6% pending. Pursuant to an order from the U.S. Department of Labor, Ohio will release unemployment numbers on a weekly basis when the national report is released on Thursday.
  • Ohioans can apply for unemployment benefits online 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at unemployment.ohio.gov. It is also possible to file by phone at 877-644-6562 or TTY at 888- 642-8203, Monday through Friday 7AM to 7PM, Saturday 9AM to 5PM, and Sunday 9AM to 1PM. Employers with questions should email UCTech@jfs.ohio.gov.

 

Update June 18, 2020 2:00 PM

SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loans and Advance Program Reopened to All Eligible Small Businesses and Non-Profits Impacted by COVID-19 Pandemic

To further meet the needs of U.S. small businesses and non-profits, the U.S. Small Business Administration reopened the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) and EIDL Advance program portal to all eligible applicants experiencing economic impacts due to COVID-19 today. 

SBA’s EIDL program offers long-term, low interest assistance for a small business or non-profit.  These loans can provide vital economic support to help alleviate temporary loss of revenue.  EIDL assistance can be used to cover payroll and inventory, pay debt or fund other expenses.  Additionally, the EIDL Advance will provide up to $10,000 ($1,000 per employee) of emergency economic relief to businesses that are currently experiencing temporary difficulties, and these emergency grants do not have to be repaid.

SBA’s COVID-19 Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) and EIDL Advance

  • The SBA is offering low interest federal disaster loans for working capital to small businesses and non-profit organizations that are suffering substantial economic injury as a result of COVID-19 in all U.S. states, Washington D.C., and territories.
  • These loans may be used to pay debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that can’t be paid because of the disaster’s impact, and that are not already covered by a Paycheck Protection Program loan. The interest rate is 3.75% for small businesses.  The interest rate for non-profits is 2.75%.
  • To keep payments affordable for small businesses, SBA offers loans with long repayment terms, up to a maximum of 30 years. Plus, the first payment is deferred for one year.
  • In addition, small businesses and non-profits may request, as part of their loan application, an EIDL Advance of up to $10,000. The EIDL Advance is designed to provide emergency economic relief to businesses that are currently experiencing a temporary loss of revenue.  This advance will not have to be repaid, and small businesses may receive an advance even if they are not approved for a loan.
  • SBA’s EIDL and EIDL Advance are just one piece of the expanded focus of the federal government’s coordinated response.
  • The SBA is also assisting small businesses and non-profits with access to the federal forgivable loan program, the Paycheck Protection Program, which is currently accepting applications until June 30, 2020.

For additional information, please visit the SBA disaster assistance website at SBA.gov/Disaster.

Update June 17, 2020 2:30 PM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, and Lt. Governor Jon Husted  provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic at their press conference on June 16, 2020.

SUMMER FOOD PROGRAM: 

More than 65,000 children a day are expected to take part in Ohio’s Summer Food Service Program this summer. With more than 1,500 sites across the state, many of the programs have set up new guidelines for distributing food to kids.

Additional information can be found at education.ohio.gov/kidseat or by calling 866-3-HUNGRY.

POP-UP SITES:

Governor DeWine announced additional pop-up testing sites will be available throughout the state this week. Testing will be available at Elyria City Hall, 131 Court Street, Elyria, Ohio 44035 between 9:00am and 3:00pm on Friday, June 19th.

More information on pop-up sites can be found at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

HOUSES OF WORSHIP REMINDER:

Governor DeWine reminded houses of worship to continue utilizing the best practices when resuming in-person services. While these are not requirements, they are best practices that include having families sit socially-distant from other families; encouraging members to wear face coverings; and eliminating the touching of common surfaces, such as the collection basket and hymnals, as much as possible.

This guidance can be found at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

FRAUDULENT ACTIVITY:

Lt. Governor Husted also reminded Ohioans to be on alert for individuals that may want to take advantage of them with potential fraudulent cures, work-from-home offers, and messages asking for personal information.

He also warned Ohioans of fraudulent unemployment claims. For resources on how to protect your personal information and protect yourself from fraud, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov or the Ohio Department of Commerce, or the Ohio Department of Insurance websites.  If you think you have been a victim of fraud contact the Ohio Attorney General office.

COUNTY FAIRS AND ANIMAL EXHIBITIONS:

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine announced that the following order has been signed by Ohio Department of Health Interim Director Lance Himes:

Director’s Order Reopening County Fairs and Animal Exhibitions, with Exceptions

Update June 12, 2020 2:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers at their press conference this morning.   There are a total of 3,694 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 112-171.

Click here to see the entire presentation given by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health this morning.

Update June 12, 2020 12:30 PM

Governor Dewine and Lt. Governor Husted made the following announcements at their press conference on June 11, 2020.

TESTING EXPANSION:

Governor DeWine announced that Ohio is expanding testing and encouraged those who want a COVID-19 test, including those who are low-risk or asymptomatic, to talk with their health care provider or contact a testing location to arrange a test.

NEW ROLE FOR DR. AMY ACTON: 

Governor DeWine announced that Dr. Amy Acton will step down as director of the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) and begin serving as his chief health advisor effective at the end of business today. Lance Himes, who previously served as ODH’s director, was named interim-director.

ODJFS EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING GRANT: 

Lt. Governor Husted announced that the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) will receive an $8.5 million federal Employment Recovery National Dislocated Worker Grant to help reemploy individuals who lost their jobs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and to help employers rebuild their workforces.

Update June 5, 2020 3:30 PM

Governor DeWine announced today that the following sectors are permitted to reopen on June 19, 2020:

  • Casinos
  • Racinos
  • Amusement parks
  • Water parks

ASSISTED LIVING VISITATION ORDER: 

Dr. Acton has signed the Third Amended Director’s Order to Limit Access to Ohio’s Nursing Homes and Similar Facilities, with Exceptions. 

This order allows properly prepared assisted living facilities and intermediate care facilities for individuals with developmental disabilities to begin to allow outdoor visitation on June 8. The lifted restrictions do not yet apply to nursing homes.

Update June 5, 2020 2:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers at their press conference this morning.   There are a total of 3,428 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 100-157. Based on the limited testing that is available, we know this number is probably higher than reported.  It is important that we stay vigilant with our hand washing and social distancing.

Click here to see the entire presentation given by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health this morning.

 

Update June 5, 2020 9:00 AM

Governor Announces Orders To Reopen Certain Facilities

Governor Mike DeWine  announced the reopening of certain facilities including certain entertainment facilities with health and safety restrictions.

Day camps and residential camps may open at any time.  Entertainment venues listed below may open beginning June 10th if they are able to follow Retail, Consumer, Service & Entertainment Guidelines and other applicable additional guidance:

  • Aquariums
  • Art galleries
  • Country clubs
  • Ice skating rinks
  • Indoor family entertainment centers
  • Indoor sports facilities
  • Laser tag facilities
  • Movie theaters (indoor)
  • Museums
  • Playgrounds (outdoor)
  • Public recreation centers
  • Roller skating rinks
  • Social clubs
  • Trampoline parks
  • Zoos

Health orders will be posted on coronavirus.ohio.gov when available.

Additional information and sector specific operating requirements can be found on the Responsible RestartOhio page coronavirus.ohio.gov/ResponsibleRestartOhio.

Update June 1, 2020 8:30 AM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine announced over the weekend that the following orders have been signed by  Ohio Department of Health Director Amy Acton, M.D., MPH:

Update May 29, 2020 2:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers at their press conference this morning.   There are a total of 3,063 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 86-128. Based on the limited testing that is available, we know this number is probably higher than reported.  It is important that we stay vigilant with our hand washing and social distancing.

Click here to see the entire presentation given by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health this morning.

Update May 28, 2020 6:30 PM

Parking Meter Enforcement to Resume on Monday, June 1st

Lakewood’s metered parking enforcement moratorium (enacted on March 18 to support businesses) will be lifted on Monday, June 1st when enforcement will resume.  As more and more businesses continue to reopen including retail stores, restaurants, hair salons and nail salons, it is important that parking spaces are turned over.  Metered parking increases turnover and helps ensure parking spaces are available for customers.

Update May 27, 2020 11:00 AM

The City of Lakewood continues to prepare, prevent, and respond to the COVID-19 crisis.

“I am committed to protecting Lakewood’s health and safety while maximizing opportunity for our businesses to succeed,” said Mayor Meghan George. “The City is following the recommendations of the Ohio Department of Health, the Governor’s Office, and the Cuyahoga County Board of Health as the Responsible Restart Ohio plan is put into place. With our exceptional population density, we must be more vigilant than other communities if we are to remain healthy and safe. Therefore, with public safety as a top priority, we are announcing additional cancellations and modifications to City sponsored events and services. Please note that our facilities and services remain open to the public with an appointment.”

Anyone entering a city building is required to wear a mask or other face covering. The Lakewood Municipal Court continues to operate on a limited basis within City Hall through Friday, May 29, 2020.  The Court will resume its regular business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) within City Hall beginning Monday, June 1, 2020.  Unless otherwise permitted by the court, access to the building is limited to attorneys, parties and witnesses for all court proceedings.

The Lakewood Tax Office will be re-opened to the public beginning Monday, June 1, 2020. Hours are Monday – Friday, 9:00 am to 4:00 pm. Individuals are encouraged to call (216) 529-6620 to make an appointment for in-person visits

Summer Events

  • Meet the Trucks: cancelled
  • Summer Solstice Celebration: cancelled
  • Independence Day parade, fireworks and activities: cancelled
  • Pavilion rentals: cancelled through June 30th

Facilities

  • Lakewood Public Pools: open July 1st*
  • Lakewood Dog Park: opens June 1st
  • Lakewood Skatepark: opens June 1st
  • Senior Center: facilities remain closed
  • Playgrounds: remain closed until further notice

More Information

Please visit www.onelakewood.com/coronavirus and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for further updates and alerts. Additionally, you can find more information at the following links:

  • Centers for Disease Control: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus
  • Ohio Department of Health: https://coronavirus.ohio.gov
  • Cuyahoga County Board of Health: www.ccbh.net/coronavirus

Stay Current

The City of Lakewood has established a phone number featuring a recording of regular updates. Call 216-227-3240 to hear the latest coronavirus/COVID-19 news from the City. You can also register for Cuyahoga County’s ReadyNotify notification system, used by the City of Lakewood for public alerts https://ready.cuyahogacounty.us/en-US/ReadyNotify.aspx. The Ohio Department of Health has also set up a call center to answer questions regarding the Coronavirus. The call center is open seven days a week, from 9:00 am to 8:00 pm and can be reached at 1-833-427-5634.

*Dates subject to change

Update May 22, 2020 12:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers at their press conference this morning.   There are a total of 2,579 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 70-121. Based on the limited testing that is available, we know this number is probably higher than reported.  It is important that we stay vigilant with our hand washing and social distancing.

Click here to see the entire presentation given by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health this morning.

Update May 22, 2020 9:00 AM

Lt. Governor Husted has announced several new sector opening dates in Ohio:

  • Beginning Tuesday, May 26, miniature golf, batting cages, and bowling alleys may resume operations if they can meet required safety protocols.
  • Beginning Tuesday, May 26, skills training for all sports, including contact sports, may resume if required safety protocols can be met. Tournaments, games, and competitions for contact sports are still prohibited.
  • Beginning Monday, June 1, catering and banquet centers may reopen if they can meet required safety protocols. Protocols include six feet between tables, no congregating, and a crowd size of no more than 300 people.

Full guidelines to ensure that these sectors operate in the safest manner possible are/will be available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Update May 21, 2020 9:00 AM

Governor Mike DeWine announced that the following orders have been signed by Ohio Department of Health Director Amy Acton, M.D., MPH:

Update May 20, 2020 9:00 AM

Governor DeWine Announces Ohioans Protecting Ohioans Urgent Health Advisory

Governor DeWine announced at his press conference yesterday the details of the new “Ohioans Protecting Ohioans Urgent Health Advisory” which replaces the Stay Safe Ohio order that was issued by the Ohio Department of Health on April 30, 2020.

“Ohioans take care of Ohioans because that is at the core of who we are, and that is how we are going to save our economy,” said Governor DeWine. “What this comes down to now is that each of us has a responsibility to each other to slow the spread.  No other time in our lives will our individual actions play a greater role in saving lives.”

The health order replaces language requiring Ohioans to stay at home with limited exceptions with language that strongly recommends that citizens, especially those who are high-risk, stay at home as much as possible. The order does not change the mass gathering restrictions, which remain at a 10-person limit.

The new health advisory also lifts overall travel restrictions and the requirement to quarantine if someone travels to or returns to Ohio. Unnecessary travel within or outside of Ohio is not encouraged.

In addition, those who have tested positive for COVID-19 and have not recovered, those who are presumptively diagnosed with COVID-19, and those who are exhibiting the symptoms identified in the screening guidance available from the CDC and the Ohio Department of Health, remain prohibited from entering the state of Ohio unless they are doing so under medical orders for purposes of medical care, are being transported by emergency medical services EMS, are driving or being driven directly to a medical provider for the purposes of initial care, or are a permanent resident of Ohio.

OHIO BWC TO PROVIDE FACE COVERINGS TO EMPLOYERS: 

Governor DeWine announced today that the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation (BWC) will begin distributing at least 2 million non-medical-grade face coverings to Ohio employers who are covered by BWC.

Public and private employers that participate in the State Insurance Fund will receive a package from BWC containing at least 50 face coverings. These packages will be shipped in batches beginning tomorrow.

The masks, which are intended to support and enhance any workforce safety and health efforts businesses already have in place, are funded through BWC’s existing budget and will not impact any premiums.

Update May 19, 2020 2:00 PM

Update May 15, 2020 1:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers at their press conference this morning.   There are a total of 2254 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 57-103. Based on the limited testing that is available, we know this number is probably higher than reported.  It is important that we stay vigilant with our hand washing and social distancing.

Click here to see the entire presentation given by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health this morning.

Update May 15, 2020 9:00 AM

CHILD CARE: MAY 31

Beginning Sunday, May 31, childcare providers in Ohio will be permitted to reopen if these providers can meet required safety protocols.

To ensure that these establishments operate in the safest manner possible, Governor DeWine’s Early Childhood Advisory Council created a detailed list of guidelines and best practices for childcare centers to follow. The full list of mandatory and recommended best practices can be found at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

To assist in the reopening of child care centers, Ohio will use more than $60 million in federal CARES Act funding to provide reopening grants to all of Ohio’s childcare providers, including family childcare, childcare centers, and both publicly-funded and private providers. More information on how to apply will be posted to the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services’ website soon.

Governor DeWine also announced that Ohio will fund a research project to study best practices for controlling the spread of COVID-19 in child care settings. Information gathered from the study will continue to inform child care regulations moving forward.

The reopening date of May 31 also applies to day camps that can meet required safety protocols. A detailed list of guidelines and best practices for day camps will be available soon at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

CAMPGROUNDS: MAY 21

Beginning Thursday, May 21, campgrounds in Ohio will be permitted to reopen if these facilities can meet required safety protocols.

To ensure that campgrounds operate in the safest manner possible, Governor DeWine’s Outdoor Recreation Advisory Group created a detailed list of guidelines and best practices for day camps to follow.  The full list of mandatory and recommended best practices for both campgrounds and campers is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

OHIO BUREAU OF MOTOR VEHICLES (CERTAIN SERVICES): MAY 26 

Beginning Tuesday, May 26, Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV) locations in Ohio will be permitted to reopen for certain services if these facilities can meet required safety protocols.

Services that can be accomplished online should still be done online. More details on online BMV services can be found at oplates.com.

To ensure that each deputy registrar location operates in the safest manner possible, the BMV is creating a detailed list of guidelines and best practices for deputy registrars to follow.  A full list of mandatory and recommended best practices is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

GYMS, FITNESS CENTERS: MAY 26

Beginning Tuesday, May 26, gyms and fitness centers in Ohio will be permitted to reopen if these facilities can meet required safety protocols.

To ensure that these establishments operate in the safest manner possible, Governor DeWine’s Gyms Advisory Group is creating a detailed list of guidelines and best practices for gyms and fitness centers to follow.  A full list of mandatory and recommended best practices is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

SPORTS LEAGUES (NON-CONTACT, LIMITED CONTACT): MAY 26

Beginning Tuesday, May 26, sports leagues in Ohio will be permitted to operate if these leagues can meet required safety protocols. This applies only to non-contact and limited-contact sports.

To ensure that non-contact and limited-contact sports leagues operate in the safest manner possible, Governor DeWine’s Large Venue Advisory Group is creating a detailed list of guidelines and best practices for sports leagues to follow.  A full list of mandatory and recommended best practices is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Safety protocols for high-contact sports are in development.

PUBLIC/CLUB POOLS: MAY 26

Beginning Tuesday, May 26, public pools and club pools that are regulated by local health departments in Ohio will be permitted to reopen if these facilities can meet required safety protocols.    The opening of the Lakewood city pools has been delayed until at least July 1, 2020.  The city and schools are currently evaluating when and if the pools will be open this summer.

To ensure that these pools operate in the safest manner possible, Governor DeWine’s  Outdoor Recreation Advisory Group is creating a detailed list of guidelines and best practices for these facilities to follow.  A full list of mandatory and recommended best practices is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov. 

This does not apply to water parks or amusement parks. Safety protocols for these venues are in development.

Update May 13, 2020 12:00 PM

MASSAGE THERAPY, ACUPUNCTURE, COSMETIC THERAPY:

Lt. Governor Husted has announced that sectors licensed by the State Medical Board of Ohio, including massage therapy, acupuncture, cosmetic therapy will be permitted to reopen on May 15 with the implementation of proper safety measures.

To ensure that these establishments operate in the safest manner possible, the State Medical Board of Ohio worked with members of Governor DeWine’s Personal Services Advisory Group and the Ohio Department of Health to create a detailed list of guidelines and best practices for these service providers to follow. The full list of mandatory and recommended best practices can be found at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

TATTOO AND BODY PIERCING SERVICES: 

Tattoo and body piercing services will also be permitted to reopen on May 15 with the implementation of proper safety measures.

To ensure that these establishments operate in the safest manner possible, Governor DeWine’s Personal Services Advisory Group created a detailed list of guidelines and best practices for these service providers to follow. The full list of mandatory and recommended best practices can be found at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

OLDER ADULTS – STAYING CONNECTED:

To help ensure that older Ohioans stay connected while staying at home, Ohio Department of Aging Director Ursel McElroy has announced a new service  that will provide a daily check-in by phone for Ohioans age 60 or older.

The Staying Connected program will call older adults who sign up for the service during a predetermined window of time. When participants answer the phone, they will be asked to respond via touch-tone to confirm that they are OK or to access live support.

If no one answers after three attempts, a call is then made to an alternate contact (if provided) or to non-emergency services.  The service can be canceled at any time.

Eligible Ohioans can sign up at aging.ohio.gov or by calling 1-800-266-4346.

Staying Connected is not an emergency response service, and participants should always use 911 or their emergency response system if they are injured or in need of emergency assistance.

Update May 11, 2020 11:00 AM

City of Lakewood Extends Metered Parking Moratorium in Support of Reopening Businesses
Suspension of enforcement that began on March 18th will remain in place until June 1st

The City of Lakewood is extending its moratorium on metered parking in Lakewood until June 1st.

“This pandemic isn’t just a public health crisis—it’s an economic crisis, as well,” Mayor George said.  “Lakewood is being hit especially hard because we have such a concentration of proud small businesses.  We are going to give every advantage that City Hall can afford to Lakewood businesses so they can succeed.”

“In Lakewood, small business is big business. This community support local merchants and those merchants employ many who live here,” said Ian Andrews, Executive Director of LakewoodAlive. “COVID-19 has forced mass layoffs, closures, and upended entire business models. The George Administration has worked hand-in-hand with LakewoodAlive, the Lakewood Chamber of Commerce, and Mayor George’s new Small Business Task Force to help merchants secure resources, hear their needs, and provide support to help them navigate these turbulent waters. Continuing the parking moratorium is yet another sign of support from the administration to those entrepreneurs who have risked it all and are eager to safely reopen.”

Mayor George added, “We heard businesses in Lakewood when they asked us to help in March with a moratorium on metered parking and we responded. On June 1st, we’ll resume metered parking enforcement to encourage turnover in those parking spots and a higher level of customer flow for our small businesses.”

The metered parking moratorium began on March 18th.

Update May 8, 2020 12:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers at their press conference this morning.   There are a total of 1873 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 53-86. Based on the limited testing that is available, we know this number is probably higher than reported.  It is important that we stay vigilant with our hand washing and social distancing.

Update May 8, 2020 10:00 AM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine has announced the next phase of the Responsible RestartOhio plan as it relates to restaurants, bars, and personal care services.

As part of the  announcement, Governor DeWine reminded Ohioans that COVID-19 is still incredibly dangerous and stressed the importance of continuing to exercise safe health habits as different sectors of the economy begin to reopen.

RESTAURANTS/BARS: 

Restaurants and bars in Ohio will be permitted to reopen as follows:

  • Outdoor dining: May 15
  • Dine-in service: May 21

To ensure that these establishments operate in the safest manner possible, Governor DeWine’s Restaurant Advisory Group created a detailed list of guidelines and best practices for restaurant and bar owners to follow. The full list of mandatory and recommended best practices can be found by clicking here.

PERSONAL CARE SERVICES:

Personal care services such as hair salons, barbershops, day spas, nail salons, and tanning facilities may reopen on May 15.

To ensure that these establishments operate in the safest manner possible, Governor DeWine’s Personal Services Advisory Group created a detailed list of guidelines and best practices for personal care service providers to follow. The full list of mandatory and recommended best practices can be found by clicking here.

Update May 5, 2020 1:00 PM

City of Lakewood Announces Completion of Small Business Rent Relief Grant Program

The City of Lakewood completed its Small Business Rent Relief grant program on Monday, May 4.  With the announcement of awards to the final recipients, the City has issued $187,492.92 in rent relief grants to 118 small businesses in Lakewood.

“We understood at the very beginning of this pandemic that the public health crisis was only half of the equation—the economic fallout would be severe. Lakewood is so proud of its small businesses and Shop Local mentality. Unfortunately, our small businesses are vulnerable to the kind of disruption or total shutdown that has resulted from the pandemic. I want to do everything within the power of the Mayor’s Office to show our small businesses that we support them. I’m proud of my team and our partners, LakewoodAlive and the Lakewood Chamber of Commerce, for their roles in making this happen for the Lakewood small business community,” Mayor Meghan George said.

City Planner Katelyn Milius said, “Lakewood was fortunate to be able to mobilize quickly in implementing this program. The City has not offered a program like this before but the Mayor and our team saw the importance of supporting our small, local businesses that line Lakewood’s commercial corridors.  Lakewood’s Community Vision document guides our decisions as a department and one of the goals in the Vision is to ‘strengthen economic development efforts to increase commercial occupancy.’  This was a critical time to support that goal.”

The City officially closed applications to the Small Business Rent Relief grant program on March 27th, 2020.  The program reimbursed one month’s rent to mitigate the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic on Lakewood small businesses.

This program allowed for a maximum rent reimbursement award of $3,000 for small businesses operating out of commercial or retail storefronts in Lakewood.  The Small Business Rent Relief grant program was sourced from the City of Lakewood’s economic development budget and from Community Development Block Grant funds.

“It was also touching that some business owners voluntarily withdrew their applications during the process so that the money could be distributed to those who needed it most.  We’re thankful for all of Lakewood’s business owners who contribute to the betterment of our community,” said Milius.

Several businesses receiving support from the program voiced their appreciation.

Allen Singleton of Apple Jax Toys also received Small Business Rent Relief Grant Program support. “The Small Business Rent Relief program was a welcomed resource for us. We didn’t need to borrow as much from lenders for a retail store that has zero income currently coming in to pay our mounting bills,” Singleton said. “Add the fact that banks are backlogged with everything going on, and their lobbies being closed, the relief was so very helpful.”

“The Small Business Relief Program has been an absolute blessing,” said Brandon King, owner of Heirloom Barber & Shave Shop, who received support from the Small Business Rent Relief Grant Program. “The shop has been closed since March 18th and is still closed as we wait for the governor to allow us to open back up. All of our barbers are contemplating and speculating how life at the barbershop will be once we reopen. This program has been the only assistance that we have had thus far. The Heirloom Barber & Shave Shop family is truly grateful.”

The City of Lakewood, LakewoodAlive, and the Lakewood Chamber of Commerce remain committed to the fiscal wellbeing of Lakewood’s small business community.  By supporting small businesses in rent reimbursement, the City of Lakewood aims to improve commercial occupancy rates and offer stability in this unprecedented economic environment.

For more information on other Business Emergency Resources, visit http://www.onelakewood.com/covid19businessresources/ or contact the Planning & Development Department via email at planning@lakewoodoh.net.

 

Update May 1, 2020 4:00 PM

Cuyahoga Job and Family Services Provides Emergency Assistance to Families Affected by COVID-19
 Local Retailers Needed to Accept Purchases

Low to moderate income families impacted by COVID-19 may be eligible for help with food, essential supplies and housing costs through emergency funding from the state. Cuyahoga Job and Family Services (CJFS) is accepting applications for assistance and looking for local stores that will accept payment from the county for items purchased through the program.

Due to the current state of emergency the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services has provided $1,687,921.19 in Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) funding to Cuyahoga County for distribution through the CJFS Prevention, Retention, and Contingency (PRC) program. The COVID-19 PRC fund is designated for TANF eligible families to temporarily to assist with vouchers for essential needs such as additional food, household cleaning products, self-care items, and housing costs.

With the help of Cuyahoga County Department of Development, CJFS has been able to identify local small businesses that sell the essential products allowable with the voucher. A commitment to accept the vouchers has already been received from Dave’s Supermarkets, Marc’s, and Save A Lot. We encourage community businesses to join CJFS in this venture and help serve Cuyahoga County residents.

Eligibility for the PRC program is limited to Cuyahoga County families that include a minor child, a pregnant individual, or a non-custodial parent of a minor child receiving Ohio Works First (OWF), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and/or Medicaid. Citizenship, income and assets are reviewed for eligibility as well.

 PRC applications can be downloaded at https://cjfs.cuyahogacounty.us/en-US/PRC.aspx or picked up at a Neighborhood Family Service Center. Applications and verifications can be submitted by any of the following methods:

o Virgil E. Brown – 1641 Payne Ave.

o Old Brooklyn – 4261 Fulton Parkway

o Quincy Place – 8111 Quincy Ave.

o Westshore Opportunity Center Drop-Off Location – 9830 Lorain Avenue

  • Fax – Submit to (216) 987-8655.
  • Phone – Call (216) 987-7392 to leave a message. Calls are returned to complete an application.

Vendors interested in accepting the PRC vouchers can contact (216) 987-6757 for more information. To learn more about PRC and the application process, visit https://cjfs.cuyahogacounty.us/en-US/PRC.aspx or call the PRC Information Line at (216) 987-7392 and leave a message.

Update May 1, 2020 1:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their COVID-19 case numbers at their press conference this morning.   There are a total of 1678 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 39-62. Based on the limited testing that is available, we know this number is probably higher than reported.  It is important that we stay vigilant with our hand washing and social distancing.

Click here to see the entire presentation given by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health this morning.

Update May 1, 2020 10:00 AM

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine today announced that the Ohio Department of Health has issued a Stay Safe Ohio Order. The new order, which incorporates the openings of businesses and services announced as part of the Responsible RestartOhio plan, will replace the previous “Stay at Home” order, which expires at 11:59 p.m. tonight.

Click here to read the full Stay Safe Ohio Order.

Update April 28, 2020 9:00 AM

Governor Announces Plans To Slowly Start Reopening The State

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine made several announcements yesterday regarding Ohio’s plan to responsibly restart Ohio’s economy during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Beginning May 1, 2020, all medically necessary procedures that do not require an overnight stay in a healthcare facility or do not require inpatient hospital admission and minimizes use of personal protective equipment may move forward. This includes regular doctor visits, well-care checks, well-baby visits, out-patient surgeries, imaging procedures, and diagnostic tests. Dental services and veterinary services may also proceed if a safe environment can be established.

Beginning on May 4, 2020, manufacturing, distribution, and construction businesses may reopen if these businesses can meet mandatory safety requirements for customers and employees. The full Responsible RestartOhio plan for manufacturing, distribution, and construction can be found by clicking here.

Beginning on May 4, 2020, general office environments may reopen if these businesses can meet mandatory safety requirements for customers and employees. The full Responsible RestartOhio plan for general office environments can be found by clicking here.

Beginning on May 12, 2020, consumer, retail and services, may reopen if these businesses can meet mandatory safety requirements for customers and employees. The full Responsible RestartOhio plan for consumer, retail and services can be found by clicking here.

 

The general safe business practices that all businesses must follow as they reopen are:

  • Requiring face coverings for all employees, and recommending them for clients and customers at all times
  • Conducting daily health assessments or self-evaluations of employees to determine if they should work
  • Maintaining good hygiene at all times such as hand washing and social distancing
  • Cleaning and sanitizing workplaces throughout the day and at the close of business or between shifts
  • Limiting capacity to meet social distancing guidelines

CONTINUED CLOSURES: 

The following types of establishments are ordered to remain closed due to their increased risk of potential COVID-19 exposure:

  • Schools and daycares
  • Dine-in restaurants and bars (carry-out is still permitted)
  • Personal appearance and beauty businesses
  • Older adult daycare serveries and senior centers
  • Adult day support or vocational rehabilitation services in group settings
  • Entertainment, recreation, and gyms

For greater detail on the types of businesses that must stay closed,  click here.

STAY AT HOME ORDER / LARGE GATHERINGS: 

Because the danger of COVID-19 still exists, Ohio’s Stay at Home order will remain in effect to encourage Ohioans to continue making reasonable, rational decisions about leaving home.

Large gatherings of more than 10 people are still prohibited.

For more information, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov/ResponsibleRestartOhio

Update April 24, 2020 1:00 PM

City of Lakewood Honors Frontline Workers
Signs acknowledge sacrifices being made for the community

The City of Lakewood posted large signs in four prominent locations across the community today in honor of frontline workers.

“As the leader of a 400-person enterprise, I am particularly aware of the health and safety of my team who provide for the health and safety of the 51,000 people living in this community and thousands more who work or shop here. The City of Lakewood’s Fire Department, Police Department, and Public Works Department are battling against COVID-19 every day, in addition to the countless health care, logistics, and food service workers who live in Lakewood, to provide us some semblance of normalcy in these unprecedented times. They deserve our highest praise and gratitude. These signs are just one gesture to call attention to the sacrifices they are making for our benefit.”

The City’s Public Works sign shop created the signs this week after the Mayor’s Office suggested City Hall should find a way to acknowledge the community’s frontline workers.

“We had all the materials in-house. It didn’t take long for our team to lay out the design for the signs, create them, and get them posted without spending any extra money,” Public Works Director Roman Ducu said. “Our guys work hard and it’s really humbling to be honored alongside Police and Fire for what we’re doing during this pandemic.”

The signs, which are 4’ x 10’ and 4’ x 8’, carry the message, “THANK YOU FRONTLINE WORKERS. Police and Fire, City Service and Grocery Staff, Delivery Drivers and Healthcare Workers and Everyone Else on the Front Lines. YOU ARE OUR HEROES.”  The signs are placed conspicuously at Madison Park, Lakewood Park, City Hall, and City Center and will remain posted for the foreseeable future.

The City’s Fire Department has a team of 72 firefighters/paramedics and 18 officers. “Everyone in the Fire Department is a frontline worker,” Fire Chief Tim Dunphy said. “We are running three shifts, twenty-four hours a day, every day, all year, every year. Our members are covering multiple roles and backing each other up. We’re watching out for Lakewood and for each other.”

Lakewood’s Police Department has a staff of 125 people, with 115 of them serving in a frontline capacity, providing direct-contact safety services. Police Chief Tim Malley said, “Calls for service have gone down significantly. This has enabled our team to provide more support to the community in responding to health emergency calls and enforcing other COVID-19 related orders issued by the Governor.”

The Public Works Department in Lakewood has 130 employees, 77 of whom are frontline workers: 25 in the Division of Refuse & Recycling; 18 in the Division of Streets, Forestry, Signs, and Signals; 17 in the Division of Parks; 12 in the Division of Sewers; and 5 in the Division of Water.

Update April 24, 2020 12:00 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their Coronavirus case numbers at their press conference this morning.   There are a total of 1505 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 24-42. Based on the limited testing that is available, we know this number is probably higher than reported.  It is important that we stay vigilant with our hand washing and social distancing.

Click here to see the entire presentation given by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health this morning.

Update April 24, 2020 10:45 AM

The City of Lakewood continues to adjust in response to the COVID-19 crisis.

“Public health and safety are my top priorities,” said Mayor George. “I am encouraged by the progress we are making in Ohio to flatten the curve. However, I have also seen the number of COVID-19 cases in Lakewood steadily increase each week in data released by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health. We live in the most densely populated community in Ohio. That makes Lakewood exceptional and, as such, we must take exceptional steps to protect ourselves. I am taking every precaution possible to protect the citizens of Lakewood from COVID-19. I recognize the costs to our community and I am still resolved that this is the right course for us to protect our own health and our neighbors’.”

Cancellations

All City-sponsored events are canceled through May 31, 2020. In addition, the following events are canceled:

  • KLB Spring Humus Sale & Adopt-Spot Flower Pick-up scheduled for May 16, 2020 from 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. at Lakewood Park.
  • All pavilion rentals are canceled through May 31st.

In addition, the City and the Lakewood Early Childhood PTA, have jointly decided to cancel Meet the Trucks, scheduled for Saturday, June 6th at Lakewood Park.

While final decisions have not been made about other events beyond May 31st, there is a strong likelihood that there will be more cancellations.

Closures

  • City buildings will remain closed through May 31st, except by appointment.   The Lakewood Municipal Court will continue to operate within City Hall during the Court’s posted hours.  Those with business before the Court will be permitted to enter as usual.  Please visit the Court’s website at www.lakewoodcourtoh.com/ for updates.
  • City pavilions are closed and public and private events have been canceled through May 31st.
  • Playgrounds and park restrooms will remain closed through May 31st. Parks are open to the public with the requirement of social distancing and no group gatherings.

More Information

Please visit www.onelakewood.com/coronavirus and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for further updates and alerts. Additionally, you can find more information at the following links:

Stay Current

The City of Lakewood has established a phone number featuring a recording of daily updates. Call 216-227-3240 to hear the latest coronavirus/COVID-19 news from the City.  You can also register for Cuyahoga County’s ReadyNotify notification system, used by the City of Lakewood for public alerts https://ready.cuyahogacounty.us/en-US/ReadyNotify.aspx.  The Ohio Department of Health has also set up a call center to answer questions regarding the Coronavirus. The call center is open seven days a week, from 9am to 8pm and can be reached at 1-833-

Update April 23, 2020 10:00 AM

The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (MHAS) announced the launch of a new mental health COVID CareLine for Ohioans.

Trained staff will be available to provide emotional assistance to anyone struggling with mental health concerns due to the ongoing stress of the pandemic.

The number to call is 1-800-720-9616. All calls will be confidential.

Update April 20, 2020 12:00 PM

COVID-19 Checklist for Cloth Face Coverings (Masks)
Protecting Against COVID-19

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that Americans wear cloth face coverings (masks) in public to help slow the spread of COVID-19. This recommendation is being made based on studies that show a significant proportion of people with COVID-19 lack symptoms and can transmit the virus to others in close proximity, through speaking, coughing, sneezing or other means.

The City of Lakewood strongly recommends that residents take the following actions:

  • Use coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain, such as grocery stores, pharmacies, and public parks.
  • Maintain 6-feet social distancing whenever possible, even if you are wearing a face covering.
  • DO NOT place cloth face coverings on children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
  • DO NOT use medical supply masks, which must be reserved for healthcare workers, first responders, and people who are known to be sick.
  • Make cloth face coverings from household items or common materials. Use multiple layers of a fabric that does not damage or lose shape when laundered or machine dried.
  • Support small businesses selling fabric masks at a reasonable price, but watch out for scammers offering high-priced or so-called superior masks.
  • Use coverings that fit snugly but comfortably and allow for breathing without restriction. Secure with ties or ear loops.
  • Do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth when removing the face covering and wash your hands immediately after removing.
  • Launder coverings after each use. Avoid wearing when wet from laundering or from spit or mucus. 

DIY Face Coverings

  • Use tightly woven fabric (preferably cloth that lets minimal light shine through) such as quilting cloth.
  • If you need to buy materials, consider purchasing online to avoid public places.

For additional information, visit www.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

For answers to your COVID-19 questions, call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634).

If you or a loved one are experiencing anxiety related to the coronavirus pandemic, help is available.

  • Call the Disaster Distress Helpline at 1-800-985-5990 (1-800-846-8517 TTY)
  • Connect with a trained counselor through the Ohio Crisis Text Line by texting the keyword “4HOPE” to 741 741
  • Call the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services help line at 1-877-275-6364 to find resources in your community

Additional resources:

Update April 17, 2020 2:30 PM

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health released their Coronavirus case numbers at their press conference this morning.   There are a total of 1263 total cases (confirmed lab cases and probable cases) reported in Cuyahoga County.  This does not include the numbers from the City of Cleveland.

In Lakewood, the number of cases is reported to be 21-35. Based on the limited testing that is available, we know this number is probably higher than reported.  It is important that we stay vigilant with our hand washing and social distancing.

Click here to see the entire presentation given by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health this morning.

Update April 17, 2020 10:30 AM

County Announces Creation of Small Business Stabilization Fund Totaling Over $4 Million to Support Businesses During COVID-19 Pandemic
Local Partners Come Together to Support Small, Neighborhood-Based Businesses in the First Small Business Coalition of Funders and Partners in the County

Cuyahoga County has committed $500,000 to the creation of a Small Business Stabilization Fund to support small, neighborhood-based businesses throughout Cuyahoga County during the COVID-19 pandemic. This Stabilization Fund complements Cuyahoga County’s Small Business Resource Center website, www.cuyahogacounty.us/helpforbusiness, and its call center, which has received more than 375 calls from business owners.

This is the first-ever small business coalition of funders and partners in the county.

A coalition of local partners have come together to help make this plan a reality, including the KeyBank Business Boost and Build program powered by JumpStart, the Economic & Community Development Institute (ECDI), the National Development Council, Village Capital Corporation, the Urban League of Greater Cleveland, and the Greater Cleveland Partnership/Business Growth Collaborative. The total commitment between both grants and loans for the Stabilization Fund is over $4 million. Grant funds available total $500,000, and loan funds committed to date total more than $3.5 million. The fund is to be “administered” by ECDI in partnership with Cuyahoga County.

Grants to small businesses from the Small Business Stabilization Fund will be available starting at $2,500, up to $5,000, based on need, as evaluated by a grant committee composed of small business and banking professionals and supported by Cuyahoga County Department of Development staff. Loans will also be available through the Stabilization Fund partners, from $5,000, up to $350,000, depending on underwriting. Full information on eligibility for grants is found by clicking here.

Small business owners interested in applying for a grant or loan through the Stabilization Fund should fill out the Business Assistance Application by clicking here. Applications for the first round of grant funding will be open April 17 at 9:00 a.m. and close Thursday, April 23 at 5:00 p.m. Grant applications will be reviewed by the Stabilization Fund Team which includes the Grant Committee. Grant awards will be announced by Tuesday, April 28 and grant funds will be distributed to businesses starting that week.

Applicants who meet both grant and loan criteria will have the choice of applying for a grant of $2,500-$5,000 or applying for a larger loan.

Businesses applying for loans will be connected with appropriate lending partners to go through their normal loan underwriting process. A business may apply for a grant and also apply for a loan if their need is greater than the amount of grant funds available to them.

Small business owners can learn more about the Stabilization Fund and resources available to them by calling the Small Business Resource Center at 216-452-9714 or by visiting the Coronavirus Business Resources page on the Cuyahoga County website.

Update April 16, 2020 1:30 PM

If you are sick or caring for someone who is sick, the CDC recommends you take some extra steps to help prevent germs from spreading to people in your home and community.

Click here for those CDC recommendations.

If you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call a healthcare provider for medical advice.

Update April 13, 2020 3:30 PM

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) has made available funds from Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) to provide assistance to families affected by COVID-19. This emergency assistance is designated to assist eligible families with essential needs during the current state of emergency.

Temporary funding through the Prevention, Retention, and Contingency (PRC) program will allow Cuyahoga Job and Family Services (CJFS) to provide emergency assistance to eligible families through a PRC voucher. While limited funding is available, COVID-19 PRC vouchers will provide assistance with additional food assistance, select essential supplies, and housing costs.

Click here for additional details regarding eligibility, availability, and how to submit an application.

For questions about COVID-19 PRC vouchers, call the PRC Information Line at (216) 987-7392 and leave a message. Please allow 48 hours for a response.

Update April 9, 2020 1:00 PM

The City of Lakewood continues to implement all recommended protocols and follow all guidance from public health leaders at the Centers for Disease Control, the Ohio Department of Health, and the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.  Residents should practice social distancing and gatherings of any size are not permitted. Lakewood Police will be monitoring and enforcing the stay-at-home order as needed. 

City Hall is currently closed to the public.  In-person meetings are discouraged, however should an in-person meeting be necessary and social distancing protocols can be ensured, an appointment can be scheduled with adequate advance notice.

While City Hall is closed, all city departments and divisions are still operating and can be reached at their normal telephone numbers and email addresses. For a list of city department contact information, visit http://www.onelakewood.com/directory/.  Phone calls and emails to City staff are being answered and voicemail messages are being returned.

Building Department

In response to the state of emergency declared by Governor DeWine and the Ohio Department of Health, the City of Lakewood – Division of Housing and Building has implemented the following TEMPORARY POLICIES to help protect the public health and safety until the state of emergency expires:

If you require an in-person meeting, an appointment can be scheduled with adequate advance notice by calling (216) 529-6270.

PERMIT APPLICATIONS can be mailed, emailed, faxed or dropped in the Building Department drop box at the main entrance of City Hall:

City of Lakewood
Division of Housing & Building
12650 Detroit Ave.
Lakewood, OH 44107
building.permits@lakewoodoh.net
Fax: 216-529-5930

CONSTRUCTION PLANS with the correct (commercial or residential) and complete plan review application, if less than 25 MB, can be emailed to building.permits@lakewoodoh.net.  Larger plans and applications can be placed in the drop box at the main entrance to City Hall.

BUILDING DEPARTMENT FORMS can be found at: http://www.onelakewood.com/accordions/building-permit/

PAYMENT can be made by check (call to verify cost) or credit card over the phone.

INSPECTIONS – The Building Department is conducting all necessary construction (permit) inspections within 4 business days.  We have implemented a limited remote/virtual inspection program. For details, please refer to: http://www.onelakewood.com/housing-building/.

Until further notice, the Building Department has suspended non-essential property maintenance inspections including interior complaint inspections that do not have a life-safety component.  Scheduled property maintenance and safety inspections are canceled.  The Building Department will resume these inspections when the COVID-19 state of emergency has been lifted.

Parks

Following COVID-19 precautions while enjoying the City’s public parks is critical to public health and “flattening the curve”. The City requires the following guidelines while visiting parks:

  • Practice Social Distancing–Safely remain six feet away from others
  • Avoid Playgrounds–all playgrounds are closed per public health order from the Ohio Department of Health
  • Take turns using ramps and paths
  • Avoid crowded areas and contact sports
  • Avoid touching surfaces
  • Leave no trash behind to protect park workers
  • Stay home if you feel sick or have a temperature higher than 100.4 degrees

“During this difficult time, outdoor areas and parks are an important resource for the community and an outlet for families. However, in order for our parks to remain open, park goers must follow the Governor’s Order on social distancing. The last thing we would want is to close the parks but if these guidelines are not followed we will have to make the difficult decision to have them closed.” Mayor George said.

Refuse & Recycling

Due to the Easter holiday, there will be no refuse or recycling collection on Monday, April 13, 2020.

Normal collection days may change for the week of April 13th.  Please refer to the chart below:

If Your Normal Collection Day Is:Have your Refuse and Recycling Ready By:
Monday6:30 AM on Tuesday, April 14
Tuesday6:30 AM on Tuesday, April 14
Wednesday6:30 AM on Wednesday, April 15
Thursday6:30 AM on Thursday, April 16
Friday6:30 AM on Friday, April 17

In addition, there are some revised hours for the Refuse & Recycling Drop-Off Centers over the holiday weekend.  Please refer to the chart below:

Holiday Weekend Refuse & Recycling Drop-Off Center Hours

DateBerea Road Drop-Off CenterLakewood Park Satellite Station
Friday, April 10, 2020Open from 8:00 AM to 2:00 PMClosed
Saturday, April 11, 2020Open from 8:00 AM to 12:00 PMClosed
Sunday, April 12, 2020ClosedClosed
Monday, April 13, 2020ClosedOpen from 8:00 AM to 2:00 PM

For further information, contact the Lakewood Division of Refuse & Recycling at (216) 252-4322.

More Information

Please continue to check this web page for future updates and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for further updates and alerts. Additionally, you can find more information at the following links:

The City of Lakewood has established a phone number featuring a recording of regular updates. Call 216-227-3240 to hear the latest coronavirus/COVID-19 news from the City.

Cuyahoga County’s ReadyNotify notification system is used by the City of Lakewood for timely public alerts. Visit https://ready.cuyahogacounty.us/en-US/ReadyNotify.aspx to register.

The Ohio Department of Health has a call center to answer questions regarding coronavirus. The call center is open seven days a week, from 9:00am to 8:00pm and can be reached at 1-833-427-5634.

Update April 8, 2020 4:00 PM

Click the video below to view Mayor George’s video update to the community regarding the COVID-19 pandemic.

Update April 7, 2020 3:00 PM

RTA to Reduce Bus and Rail Service Beginning April 12th

Beginning Sunday, April 12, the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (RTA) is reducing bus and rail service by approximately 15% in response to the COVID-19 crisis. Communities and destinations currently served by RTA will continue to have service, but it will be less frequent.

The change comes as a result of a significant drop in ridership due to the Governor’s “Stay at Home” order related to the coronavirus.

Of the 45 bus routes and rapid lines, 13 routes will not change. Most will see changes in weekday frequency only. Nearly all Saturday and Sunday schedules will remain the same. Frequency on the Healthline will be modified to 15 minutes on weekdays and 30 minutes on evenings and weekends. Park-N-Ride and Trolley service remains suspended.

For details, click here: http://www.riderta.com/news/temporary-service-reduction-april-12

 

Update April 3, 2020 5:00 PM

Stay-At-Home Order Extended

Yesterday, Governor DeWine extended his stay-at-home order through May 1, 2020.  Mayor George’s top priorities are safety and public health. The City of Lakewood continues to implement all recommended protocols and follow all guidance from public health leaders at the Centers for Disease Control, the Ohio Department of Health, and the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.  Residents should practice social distancing and gatherings of any size are not permitted. Lakewood Police will be monitoring and enforcing the stay-at-home order as needed. 

The City has closed public access to City buildings, canceled or postponed non-essential meetings, instituted livestream public meetings where practical and appropriate, enforced federal and state mandates for closure of bars, restaurants, and other relevant businesses, and required all non-essential staff to work remotely.  All staff have been informed of coronavirus protocol and advised to notify a manager and stay home if they are sick or have a temperature higher than 100.4 degrees.

The following changes to City operations and services will continue during this public health crisis.

Safety Forces

The City’s Fire Department and Police Department are award-winning preparedness experts and have taken necessary precautions to ensure the safety of staff and residents.

City Buildings

City Hall and other City buildings are closed to the public except by appointment. All City departments and divisions are still operating and can be reached at their normal telephone numbers and email addresses. For a directory of department contact information, visit onelakewood.com/directory.  Phone calls and emails to City staff will be answered or returned.

Lakewood Municipal Court

Lakewood Municipal Court will continue to operate on a limited basis within City Hall. The court will only be open between 8:00 am and 12:00 pm through May 3, 2020 for any personal appearances. Anyone with business with the Court will be permitted to enter as usual. No other visitors will be admitted to City Hall unless they have a scheduled appointment.

Motions and other filings can be made by fax, (216-529-7687), email (lakewoodcourt@Lakewoodoh.net), regular mail, or by personal delivery to the court. Payments for waiverable traffic and criminal citations can be made on-line through the court website. All other payments can be made by phone.

Seniors

Lakewood’s Human Services Department has cancelled senior programming and closed the Lawther Senior Center and the congregate dining at Fedor Manor. Call 216-521-1515 with questions or concerns.

Parks

City parks will remain open at this time. All playgrounds are closed, per the stay-at-home order. Signs are posted detailing park-specific instructions for the duration of the stay-at-home order. Residents are reminded to continue to social distance at the parks.

Parking

Rush hour parking bans are suspended through May 1st. This policy will be reviewed again at that time.  Parking bans during heavy snow remain in place for plow access and safety.

Refuse and Recycling

The Refuse and Recycling Drop Off Center located at 12920 Berea Road will amend the hours of operation to Monday-Friday 8:00am to 2:00pm for residents to drop off household and bulk garbage, yard waste, and recyclables. Beginning April 11th, the Berea Road Drop-Off Center will resume its Saturday hours from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 pm.  Residents should have their driver license or other identification ready to verify Lakewood residency.

A satellite drop-off station is available at the Lakewood Park skate park located at 14532 Lake Avenue features separate trucks for household and bulk garbage, yard waste, and recyclables. This satellite station will maintain the hours of 8:00am to 2:00pm, Monday through Friday.

The City is asking residents to help the Refuse and Recycling Department safely maintain collection services during the stay-at-home order. If you live on the side of the street with parking, please consider placing your garbage and recycling toters in your driveway apron. Residents are asked to fit as much material as possible in their respective toters. Please break down cardboard and bag all garbage.

Taxes

The Lakewood Tax Office has extended the deadline to pay City of Lakewood taxes to July 15, 2020.  The Tax Office encourages returns to be filed early.

What Can You do?

As a reminder, the City asks residents to take common-sense precautions such as the following:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water every two hours, and always for at least 20 seconds
  • Practice social distancing (stay at least six feet away from people whenever possible)
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick, elderly, or have a health condition

More Information

Please visit www.onelakewood.com/coronavirus and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for further updates and alerts. Additionally, you can find more information at the following links:

The City of Lakewood has established a phone number featuring a recording of regular updates. Call 216-227-3240 to hear the latest coronavirus/COVID-19 news from the City.

Cuyahoga County’s ReadyNotify notification system is used by the City of Lakewood for timely public alerts. Visit https://ready.cuyahogacounty.us/en-US/ReadyNotify.aspx to register.

The Ohio Department of Health has a call center to answer questions regarding coronavirus. The call center is open seven days a week, from 9:00am to 8:00pm and can be reached at 1-833-427-5634.

 

Update April 2, 2020 5:00 PM

City of Lakewood Parks Procedures During Coronavirus Pandemic

The City of Lakewood continues to keep public parks open to the community during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“During this difficult time, outdoor areas and parks are an important resource for the community and an outlet for families. However, in order for our parks to remain open, park goers must follow the Governor’s Order on social distancing. The last thing we would want is to close the parks but if these guidelines are not followed we will have to make the difficult decision to have them closed.” Mayor George said.

Following COVID-19 precautions while enjoying the City’s public parks is critical to public health and “flattening the curve”. The City requires the following guidelines while visiting parks:

  • Practice Social Distancing–Safely remain six feet away from others
  • Avoid Playgrounds–all playgrounds are closed per public health order from the Ohio Department of Health
  • Take turns using ramps and paths
  • Avoid crowded areas and contact sports
  • Avoid touching surfaces
  • Leave no trash behind to protect park workers
  • Stay home if you feel sick or have a temperature higher than 100.4 degrees

Upcoming programs and events continue to be canceled for the safety of everyone in our community. Please visit www.onelakewood.com/coronavirus and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for further updates and alerts. Additionally, you can find more information at the following links:

The City of Lakewood has established a phone number featuring a recording of daily updates. Call 216-227-3240 to hear the latest coronavirus/COVID-19 news from the City.  You can also register for Cuyahoga County’s ReadyNotify notification system, used by the City of Lakewood for public alerts https://ready.cuyahogacounty.us/en-US/ReadyNotify.aspx.  The Ohio Department of Health has also set up a call center to answer questions regarding the Coronavirus. The call center is open seven days a week, from 9am to 8pm and can be reached at 1-833-427-5634.

 

Update April 2, 2020 4:00 PM

Ohio Department of Health Issues Amended Stay At Home Order

Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton issued an amended Stay At Home order which will be in effect until 11:59 PM on May 1, 2020 in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Click here read the full order.  Click here for FAQs about the Stay At Home order.

Update April 2, 2020 9:00 AM

State of Ohio COVID-19 Update for April 1, 2020

PPE Manufacturing, Testing Order, Click and Connect, Foreclosure Prevention

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)— Ohio Governor Mike DeWine announced today the establishment of the Ohio Manufacturing Alliance to Fight COVID-19.

The collaborative public-private partnership will coordinate efforts to provide healthcare workers and first responders with the personal protective equipment (PPE).

“This new alliance will work to more quickly mobilize every manufacturer capable of helping us make PPE and win the fight against our lethal enemy,” said Governor DeWine. “This effort is important because it not only enables us to meet the immediate challenges, but it will also strengthen our PPE supply chains permanently so we are not dependent on other countries moving forward.”

The alliance includes: Ohio Manufacturers’ Association, Ohio Hospital Association, Ohio Manufacturing Extension Partnership, Manufacturing Advocacy and Growth Network, nursing home organizations, JobsOhio, Ohio Department of Administrative Services, Ohio Development Services Agency, and the Ohio Department of Health.

The alliance is working to identify and match the critical needs of Ohio’s healthcare system with companies willing and able to repurpose production to meet those needs.

Manufacturers that can help should visit RepurposingProject.com for more information. Those involved with this project will be compensated.

TESTING ORDER: 

Ohio Department of Health Director Amy Acton, MD, MPH, signed an order today to quicken the turnaround time of COVID-19 testing.

All Ohio hospitals that do not currently conduct their own testing must now send their specimens to one of the following laboratories:

  • The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
  • Cleveland Clinic
  • University Hospitals in Cleveland
  • MetroHealth

Other labs with testing capacity may be added to this list in the future.

“These labs have a massive capacity that isn’t being fully utilized right now, and these labs can turn around results more quickly than what private labs have been doing,” said Governor DeWine. “Getting test results more quickly provides peace of mind to patients and their families and gives us the best data possible so we can make decisions about where to allocate resources.”

The Ohio Department of Health will continue to analyze tests for the most critical patients, including hospitalized and symptomatic healthcare workers.

The order also directs hospitals to immediately begin utilizing new rapid tests as soon as they become available in an organized framework utilizing freestanding emergency departments, urgent care centers, free-standing ambulatory surgery centers that are not in use due to postponement of elective surgeries, and hospital multi-use healthcare facilities that house a lab service.

SNAP CLICK AND CONNECT:

To help ensure that Ohio’s most vulnerable citizens have access to food while limiting potential exposure to COVID-19, Governor DeWine announced a new partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service and grocery stores to develop a “click and collect” option for groceries.

Those receiving SNAP benefits will be able to shop online, pick up their groceries in their cars, and swipe their EBT cards from their vehicles without entering the store. If a store does not have a mobile point-of-sale device, a SNAP recipient can continue to order online, but pick up the groceries and pay inside the grocery store. This option reduces the time SNAP recipients are in the grocery store and reduces the risk of community spread.

FEMA DISASTER DECLARATION: 

The Major Presidential Disaster Declaration approved by President Trump on Tuesday provides grants from FEMA to state and local governments for costs associated with emergency protective measures, such as emergency operations center operations, fire and police services, emergency medical care, sheltering, etc.

This declaration shifts some the funding burden from state and local governments to the federal government, with the federal government picking up 75 percent of certain COVID-19 costs, including:

  • Emergency Operation Center costs;
  • State agency purchases in response to COVID;
  • Disinfection of eligible public facilities;
  • PPE;
  • Temporary medical facilities and enhanced hospital capacity.

The declaration also allows direct federal assistance to local governments, such as support from the Ohio National Guard and US Army Corps of Engineers.

FORECLOSURE PREVENTION: 

Governor DeWine signed an executive order today that seeks to provide some assistance for small businesses with mortgage and rent payments. The order asks lenders and landlords across Ohio to work with their small businesses and suspend payments for at least 90 days in an effort to avoid foreclosures.

CURRENT OHIO DATA: 

There are 2,547 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Ohio and 65 deaths. A total of 679 people have been hospitalized, including 222 admissions to intensive care units. In-depth data can be accessed by visiting coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Video of today’s full update, including versions with foreign language closed captioning, can be viewed on the Ohio Channel’s YouTube page.

For more information on Ohio’s response to COVID-19, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov or call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH.

 

Update March 31, 2020 4:00 PM

Together Ohio
Ohio’s Response to COVID-19

The Ohio Department of Health and Ohio officials are developing strategies to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic and the concerns and uncertainties it brings, but they cannot flatten the curve on their own. Every Ohioan has a part to play in helping to save lives. For many, this will mean staying at home. For others, it will mean taking care of the most vulnerable among us or providing healthcare, food, education, information, or the things we need to stay safe at home.

We are all in this together, Ohio.

If you are interested in helping your fellow Ohioans, please email together@governor.ohio.gov with the following:

  • Name.
  • Contact information.
  • How you are interested in helping.

Click here for more information about Together Ohio.

Update March 27, 2020 4:00 PM

This morning, the City of Lakewood learned from the Cuyahoga County Board of Health that cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed in our community. Mayor George said, “We knew this news would come some day and we are prepared to continue serving Lakewood residents through this time.”

Please help us mitigate the spread by following the Governor’s order to stay home when possible, practice social distancing, wash your hands thoroughly, and avoid contact with people who are sick.  Click here to view the Cuyahoga County Board of Health’s presentation that includes the map of COVID-19 cases by zip code.

Here is a listing of the most recent updates:

  • The Ohio Senate and Ohio House of Representatives have unanimously passed Amended Substitute HB 197, the Tax Code Streamlining and Correction Act. This existing tax bill was amended to address many subjects brought on by the COVID-19 emergency. Governor Dewine signed the bill this afternoon. Click here for a summary of the changes to the bill related to COVID-19.
  • The U.S. Congress has passed a $2.2 trillion stimulus bill to provide relief to the economy due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  The president is expected to sign it this afternoon.  Key elements of the proposal are $250 billion set aside for direct payments to individuals and families, $350 billion in small business loans, $250 billion in unemployment insurance benefits and $500 billion in loans for distressed companies.
  • Mayor George convened her first Business Task Force meeting to listen to the concerns of local businesses affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Residents are reminded that the Lakewood Police will be monitoring and enforcing as needed the stay-at-home order that is in place. Everyone should be practicing social distancing and groups of ten or more people congregating are not permitted. .  Click here read the full stay-at home order which explains the parameters of the order and lists all of the businesses and organizations that are permitted to stay open.

Cuyahoga County has established a Coronavirus hotline.  Individuals can call 1-855-711-3035 with questions about the Coronavirus.  This hotline is in addition to the Ohio Department of Health’s call center (216) 1-833-427-5634 and MetroHealth’s help line (440)-592-6843.

As a reminder, the City asks that residents take the following precautions:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water every two hours, and always for at least 20 seconds each time
  • Practice social distancing (stay at least six feet away from people whenever possible)
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick

For the most up to date information on COVID-19, residents should visit the following websites:

Centers for Disease Control: https://coronavirus.gov
Ohio Department of Health: https://coronavirus.ohio.gov
Cuyahoga County Board of Health: https://www.ccbh.net/coronavirus/

Update March 27, 2020 12:00 PM

Update March 26, 2020 10:00 AM

Click the video below to view Mayor George’s video message to the community regarding the COVID-19 pandemic.

Update March 25, 2020 3:00 PM

Refuse & Recycling Changes Due to COVID-19

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic,  the City of Lakewood is making the following changes to it’s refuse and recycling collections.

  • The Refuse and Recycling Drop Off Center located at 12920 Berea Road will amend the hours of operation to Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. for residents of Lakewood to drop off household and bulk garbage, yard waste, and recyclables.
  • The Drop Off Center will suspend Saturday hours through the Stay at Home initial end date of April 6th. At that time, the City will reassess these changes.
  • A satellite station will be available starting on Monday March 30th at the skate park at Lakewood Park (14532 Lake Avenue ). There will be separate trucks for household and bulk garbage, yard waste, and recyclables. This station will also maintain the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Monday-Friday through April 6th.
  • The City is asking residents to help the Refuse and Recycling Department safely maintain collection services during the Stay at Home order. If you live on the side of the street with parking, please consider placing your garbage and recycling toters in your driveway apron.  
  • Residents are asked to fit as much material as possible in their respective toters.  Please break down cardboard and bag all garbage.

Update March 23, 2020 5:00 PM

The Ohio Department of Health has issued a Stay at Home order which becomes effective at 11:59 PM on Monday, March 23, 2020.  Click here read the full order which explains the parameters of the order and lists all of the businesses and organizations that are permitted to stay open.  Click here to read the Ohio Department of Health’s FAQs regarding the Stay at Home order.

Here is a listing of the most recent updates:

  • In the interest of public health during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Lakewood Municipal Court is modifying its operations effective Monday, March 23, 2020. The court will only be open between 8:00 am and 12:00 noon through April 17, 2020 for any personal appearances.
  • Per the Stay at Home order, all playgrounds are now closed. The City is working on putting up signage at each of the city playgrounds.  City parks will remain open.
  • After a review of policies and procedures by Lakewood Police Department, it was decided that the volume of traffic supports suspending rush hour enforcement. This will be in alignment with the Governor’s Stay at Home Order which ends on 4/6. Polices will be reviewed again at that time.
  • The City has established the Small Business Rent Relief fund in order to support the vibrancy of Lakewood’s commercial corridors during the COVID-19 pandemic. Visit http://www.onelakewood.com/covid19businessresources/ for more information.
  • City Hall is closed to the public unless you have an appointment with a city department. The operations of Lakewood Municipal Court will continue to operate on a limited basis within City Hall.   Those with business before the Court will be permitted to enter as usual.  All other visitors must have an appointment.
  • While City Hall is unavailable for in-person transactions, all departments and divisions are working and can be reached by their normal telephone numbers and email addresses. For a list of city department contact information, visit http://www.onelakewood.com/directory/.  While we do have staff working from home, phone calls and emails are being answered and voicemail messages are being returned.

Cuyahoga County has established a Coronavirus hotline.  Individuals can call 1-855-711-3035 with questions about the Coronavirus.  This hotline is in addition to the Ohio Department of Health’s call center (216) 1-833-427-5634 and MetroHealth’s help line (440)-592-6843.

As a reminder, the City asks that residents take the following precautions:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water every two hours, and always for at least 20 seconds each time
  • Practice social distancing (stay at least six feet away from people whenever possible)
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick

For the most up to date information on COVID-19, residents should visit the following websites:

Centers for Disease Control: https://coronavirus.gov
Ohio Department of Health: https://coronavirus.ohio.gov
Cuyahoga County Board of Health: https://www.ccbh.net/coronavirus/

Update March 22, 2020 7:00 PM

Ohio Department of Health Issues Stay At Home Order

Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton issued a Stay At Home order effective at 11:59 PM on Monday, March 23, 2020 in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Click here read the full order which explains the parameters of the order and lists all of the businesses and organizations that are permitted to stay open.

Click here to read the Ohio Department of Health’s FAQs regarding the Stay at Home order.

 

Update March 20, 2020 5:00 PM

Pursuant to the direction of state and federal officials in response to COVID-19, on March 18th, Mayor George closed Lakewood City Hall to the public until further notice unless you have an appointment with a city department.    The operations of Lakewood Municipal Court will continue to operate on a limited basis within City Hall.   Those with business before the Court will be permitted to enter as usual.  All other visitors must have an appointment.

While City Hall is unavailable for in-person transactions, all departments and divisions are working and can be reached by their normal telephone numbers and email addresses.  Click here for a list of city department contact information.  While we do have staff working from home, phone calls and emails are being answered and voicemail messages are being returned.

If you are scheduled to appear in the Lakewood Court in the near future, contact your attorney for further instructions.  If you do not have an attorney, you may submit a written request for a continuance by fax, (216-529-7687), email (lakewoodcourt@Lakewoodoh.net), regular mail, or by personal delivery to the court. Payments can be made on-line through the court website.

Here is a listing of the most recent updates:

  • The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio has issued a moratorium on electric & gas disconnects for non-payment through May 1st. Late last week, the City announced that there would be no water shut-offs for non-payment during this crisis.
  • The IRS tax filing deadline has been extended until July 15, 2020. The Lakewood Tax Office will also extend their deadline to July 15, 2020 but encourages people to get their returns in early, if possible.
  • The Division of Refuse & Recycling Drop-Off Facility will be closed on Saturday, March 21, 2020. It will reopen on Monday, March 23, 2020 at 7:00 AM.
  • Governor DeWine ordered all senior centers and senior citizen day care centers to close at the end of business on Monday, March 23rd. Lakewood’s Lawther Senior Center and the congregate meal site at Fedor Manor have been closed since March 16th.

Cuyahoga County has established a Coronavirus hotline.  Individuals can call 1-855-711-3035 with questions about the Coronavirus.  This hotline is in addition to the Ohio Department of Health’s call center (216) 1-833-427-5634 and MetroHealth’s help line (440)-592-6843.

As a reminder, the City asks that residents take the following precautions:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water every two hours, and always for at least 20 seconds each time
  • Practice social distancing (stay at least six feet away from people whenever possible)
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick

For the most up to date information on COVID-19, residents should visit the following websites:

Centers for Disease Control: https://coronavirus.gov
Ohio Department of Health: https://coronavirus.ohio.gov
Cuyahoga County Board of Health: https://www.ccbh.net/coronavirus/

Update March 18, 2020 5:00 PM

Pursuant to the direction of state and federal officials in response to COVID-19, Mayor George has announced that Lakewood City Hall will be closed to the public until further notice unless you have an appointment with a city department.    The operations of Lakewood Municipal Court will continue to operate on a limited basis within City Hall.   Those with business before the Court will be permitted to enter as usual.  All other visitors must have an appointment with a city official.

If you are scheduled to appear in the Lakewood Court in the near future, contact your attorney for further instructions.  If you do not have an attorney, you may submit a written request for a continuance by fax, (216-529-7687), email (lakewoodcourt@lakewoodoh.net), regular mail, or by personal delivery to the court. Payments can be made on-line through the court website.

In addition to the announcement that city hall will be closed to the public until further notice, here is a listing of the most recent updates:

  • Ohio Governor Mike DeWine issued an order to close all barbershops, beauty salons, tattoo parlors, hair and nail salons across the state.
  • Additionally, the Governor ordered the closing of all but five of the state’s BMV locations.
  • Cuyahoga County has established a Coronavirus hotline. Individuals can call 1-855-711-3035 with questions about the Coronavirus.  This hotline is in addition to the Ohio Department of Health’s call center (216) 1-833-427-5634 and MetroHealth’s help line (440)-592-6843.
  • The City of Lakewood has set up a website to provide accurate information and resources for Lakewood businesses affected by COVID-19. The website address is onelakewood.com/covid19businessresources.

As a reminder, the City asks that residents take the following precautions:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water every two hours, and always for at least 20 seconds each time
  • Practice social distancing (stay at least six feet away from people whenever possible)
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick

For the most up to date information on COVID-19, residents should visit the following websites:

Update March 17, 2020 6:00 PM

The City of Lakewood is monitoring the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic closely and is taking direction from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Governor’s Office and the Cuyahoga County Board of Health regarding mitigation procedures.

All COVID-19 cases are being tracked and monitored by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health and the Ohio Department of Health.  Cases are tracked by the patient’s home residence.  As of this afternoon, there are no known Lakewood residents who have tested positive for COVID-19.  However, we know community spread of the virus is happening in Ohio and there is a strong likelihood that we will see cases here in Lakewood.    We are working diligently to minimize the spread of this virus.

The following is a listing of the most-recent updates:

  • All non-essential city employees have been sent home and are working remotely when possible.
  • Following the Governor’s recent guidance, essential city meetings will be limited to ten people in a room. All non-essential meetings have been cancelled.
  • Our Police and Fire Departments have protocols in place and are updating them based on CDC protocols.
  • The Lakewood Animal Shelter is closed as of 12:00 PM on March 17, 2020. If there is an animal concern, such as a dog running at large, individuals can contact the non-emergency police number at (216) 521-6773.
  • Metered parking is no longer being enforced at this time.
  • All fitness centers/gyms; bowling alleys; public recreation centers; movie theaters, indoor waterparks and trampoline parks in Ohio are now closed.
  • All bars and restaurants in the State of Ohio are closed to the public. Carry-out and delivery are still available.
  • Division of Housing and Building will be open by appointment only. Please call (216) 529-6270 or email housing.building@lakewoodoh.net to make an appointment.
  • The Department of Planning and Development will be open by appointment only. Please call (216) 529-6630 or planning@lakewoodoh.net make an appointment.
  • There will be no water shut-offs for non-payment during this pandemic. If you are behind on paying your water bill, payment plans are available.
  • The Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals have set-up two drive-through testing facilities for COVID-19.  If you are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, please contact a healthcare provider.  Do not go to the emergency room.  If you are experiencing life threatening symptoms, please call 9-1-1.
  • The City Hall Annex Building is closed for in-person visits. This includes Tax, Water and Vital Statistics.  If you have business with one of these divisions, you can call or email them with questions.  Many services can be handled, by phone, email and mail.  This facility also has a drop box available on the east side of the building.
    Tax: (216) 529-6620  or taxdept@lakewoodoh.net
    Water: (216) 529-6820 or water@lakewoodoh.net
    Vital Statistics: (216) 529-7690 or vitalstats@lakewoodoh.net
  • Public access at city meetings may be restricted. Any meeting that in-person attendance is restricted will be live streamed on the City of Lakewood website and will be recorded.  Those recordings will be available on the city’s website after the meeting.  Many non-essential meetings have been cancelled.
  • Lakewood’s Human Services Department has cancelled senior programming and closed the Lawther Senior Center and the congregate dining at Fedor Manor, until further notice through April 3rd, at the earliest. If a senior has questions or concerns, they can call the Senior Center at 216-521-1515.
  • All early childhood programs offered at the Lakewood Family Room and the East End Family Room at Fedor have been cancelled until further notice until April 3rd, at the earliest.
  • All H20 programming, including Breakfast with the Bunny, has been cancelled.

Please visit www.onelakewood.com/coronavirus  and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for further updates and alerts. In the meantime, if you would like more information, you can find it at the following resources:

The City has also set-up a phone line where we will record regular messages with local updates.  This line has been set-up so that those that don’t have access to the website and our social media channels can still receive the latest updates.   Please call (216) 227-3240 for the latest update.

If you have questions and wish to speak with someone directly, the Ohio Department of Health has set up a call center to answer questions regarding the Coronavirus. The call center is open seven days a week, from 9:00 am to 8:00 pm and can be reached at 1-833-427-5634.  MetroHealth has also set up a support line at (440)-592-6843.  This is a free service open to anyone.

Update March 17, 2020 8:00 AM

No In-Person Voting Today; Secretary of State to Seek Ways To Extend Voting Options

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there will be no in-person voting today.  Secretary of State Frank LaRose will seek a remedy to extend voting options so that every voter who wants to vote can vote.

Ohio Department of Health Director Amy Acton has declared a health emergency due to COVID-19, and has issued an order closing all State of Ohio polling locations on March 17, 2020.  Click here to read Dr. Acton’s full order.

Here is Governor Dewine’s statement regarding the closure:

“During this time when we face an unprecedented public health crisis, to conduct an election tomorrow would force poll workers and voters to place themselves at an unacceptable health risk of contracting coronavirus. As such, Health Director Dr. Amy Acton will order the polls closed as a health emergency. While the polls will be closed tomorrow, Secretary of State Frank LaRose will seek a remedy through the courts to extend voting options so that every voter who wants to vote will be granted that opportunity.”

Click here to read Secretary of State LaRose’s Directive to the Board of Elections around the state.

The Governor also ordered the closure of fitness centers/gyms; bowling alleys; public rec Centers; movie theaters, indoor waterparks and trampoline parks.

Update March 16, 2020 5:00 PM

Division of Housing & Building and Department of Planning public access, availability, and services

After careful consideration and to help ensure the safety of City of Lakewood residents and employees during the current state of emergency declared by Governor DeWine, the City of Lakewood’s Division of Housing & Building and the Department of Planning will be open by appointment only during this crisis.

The Division of Housing & Building and the Department of Planning are closed to public walk-ins. In-person meetings will be by appointment only.  Social distancing best practices will be instituted at in-person meetings. All Housing & Building and Planning staff are encouraged to work remotely as much as possible.

This policy will continue to be evaluated and developed over time. Please be prepared for updates as the City explores these options to serve the citizens of Lakewood. City personnel continue to keep the taxpayers front of mind while continuing to work and serve the Lakewood community remotely during this crisis.

To schedule an appointment with Planning, please call 216-529-6630 or email planning@lakewoodoh.net.

To schedule an appointment with Housing & Building, please call 216-529-6270.

Permit applications can be mailed, emailed or faxed to:

Division of Housing & Building
12650 Detroit Avenue
Lakewood, OH 44107
building.permits@lakewoodoh.net
Fax: 216-529-5930

Construction plans for review can be dropped-off with the correct plan review application in the drop box at City Hall located in the outer lobby at the main entrance.  Plans less than 25 MB can be emailed.  All forms can be found at: www.onelakewood.com/accordions/building-permit

Payment can be made by check (call to verify cost) or credit card over the phone.

The Building Department is also asking that any non-critical permit inspections be postponed until further notice until after April 3rd, at the earliest, due to the COVID-19 health crisis. The Building Department is investigating methods to complete “remote” inspections, especially those not involving life-safety.

The Building Department will not be conducting code compliance inspections for real estate transfers in accordance with LCO § 1306.53 and LCO § 1173.0l(f). As such, real estate agents will not be required to file a copy of the code compliance certificate with escrow agents in accordance with LCO §1306.54. Code compliance inspections of retail establishments for change of use [LCO 1173.0l(e)] will also not be conducted until further notice. This will not affect any safety-related or permit inspections.

Additionally, the Building Department is suspending all non-essential interior inspections until further notice including interior complaint inspections that do not have a life-safety component.  Scheduled property maintenance and safety inspections are canceled.  The Building Department will resume these inspections when the current COVID-19 state of emergency has passed.

Thank you for your patience and understanding during this unprecedented health emergency.

As a reminder, the City asks that residents take common-sense precautions such as:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water every two hours, and always for at least 20 seconds each time
  • Practice social distancing (stay at least six feet away from people whenever possible)
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick.

The City has advised all employees that they should stay home if they are experiencing symptoms of respiratory illness, including temperature over 100.4 degrees. In addition, the City has ordered hand sanitizer, cleaning wipes, and disinfectant sprays for all departments to assist with keeping surface areas clean, especially those that are public-facing.

Please visit www.onelakewood.com/coronavirus and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for further updates and alerts. In the meantime, if you would like more information, you can find it at the following resources:

The City of Lakewood has established a phone number featuring a recording of daily updates. Call 216-227-3240 to hear the latest coronavirus/COVID-19 news from the City.  The Ohio Department of Health has also set up a call center to answer questions regarding the Coronavirus. The call center is open seven days a week, from 9am to 8pm and can be reached at 1-833-427-5634.

 

Update March 16, 2020 9:00 AM

Ohio Governor DeWine Updates on Coronavirus/COVID-19 for March 15, 2020

BARS & RESTAURANTS TO CLOSE  TO THE PUBLIC AT 9:00 PM ON MARCH 15, 2020

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine today announced that the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) has issued a Director’s Order that will close all Ohio bars and restaurants to in-house patrons, effective at 9:00 p.m. today, March 15, 2020. Restaurants with take-out and delivery options will still be able to operate those services, even as their dining rooms are temporarily closed.

ENHANCED UNEMPLOYMENT AID FOR OHIOANS:

The Governor will tomorrow issue an executive order, which will grant the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) with the authority to accept and grant requests for unemployment compensation suspending the normal 1-week waiting period.

This order will also give relief to applicants who are not offered paid leave through their job, as well as those who have been quarantined by a medical professional, their employer, or whose employers must temporarily close. Those who apply for unemployment under these circumstances will be exempt from the requirement that they be actively seeking work.

ONE-TIME LIQUOR BUYBACK:

The Ohio Department of Commerce will immediately begin offering a one-time liquor buyback option to support bars and restaurants. This will especially aid those establishments that have stocked up on high-proof liquor ahead of the St. Patrick’s Day holiday for which they now have no use, due to their closure to in-house patrons.

Bars and restaurants wishing to take advantage of this opportunity should return their unopened, high-proof liquor products (obtained within the past 30 days) to the agency where they purchased the product. This opportunity is also extended to those with temporary (F2) permits for events scheduled between March 12 and April 6, 2020. If a business has questions about this program, they should reach out directly to the Liquor Enterprise Service Center (LESC) at 1(877)812-0013 or by emailing OhioLiquorInfo@Com.Ohio.gov.

SUPPORT FOR SMALL BUSINESSES & NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS:

The Ohio Development Services Agency is preparing to submit an application in the coming week to qualify Ohio for the U.S. Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program. This program provides low-interest loans up to $2 million in order to help businesses overcome the temporary loss of revenue during the state of emergency.

Click here to read the Governor’s full press release.

Update March 14, 2020 2:00 PM

City of Lakewood Response to Coronavirus/COVID-19 Crisis: Water Shut-off Amnesty and COVID-19 Drive-through Testing

The City of Lakewood is monitoring the Coronavirus (COVID-19) situation closely and is taking direction from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Ohio Department of Health and the Cuyahoga County Board of Health regarding mitigation procedures.    While it’s cause for concern, there is no need to panic.

Mayor George announced today that no water shut-offs will occur in the City of Lakewood during the coronavirus/COVID-19 crisis.

“Access to clean water is critical to our fundamental strategies to protect public health during the coronavirus crisis. Those that are experiencing financial difficulties should not have to go without running water.” Mayor George said. “Proper hand hygiene is essential to stopping the spread of coronavirus.  If someone’s water is shut off, no matter what the reason, we can’t expect them to stay home and avoid spreading this contagious disease. We have to provide the maximum opportunities for residents of Lakewood to protect themselves and stop the spread to or from others. Keeping clean water flowing is one simple step City Hall can take during this crisis, so we will not be shutting off anyone’s water.”

Also, the Cleveland Clinic announced today that drive-through testing for COVID-19 will be available, starting today, in a University Circle garage.  Please see the link below for more information.

https://newsroom.clevelandclinic.org/2020/03/13/university-hospitals-and-cleveland-clinic-partner-to-provide-drive-through-covid-19-testing/

Mayor George said, “The availability of rapid testing is essential to containing and combating this public health crisis. The drive-through aspect makes an inadvertent spread of the disease in a waiting room less likely.”

From the Cleveland Clinic’s Preparing for Coronavirus/COVID-19 website:

Do you think you may have Coronavirus/COVID-19?  Take these steps:

  • Start with a virtual visit using Cleveland Clinic Express Care Online https://my.clevelandclinic.org/online-services/express-care-online or call your primary care physician. You will be advised what to do next.
  • Call ahead before going in person to any Cleveland Clinic location.
  • Don’t go to your local emergency department for COVID-19 testing. The emergency department is only for those who need the most critical care.*

* If you have chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, a severe headache or other potentially life-threatening problems, go to the nearest emergency department or call 911.

As a reminder, the City asks that residents take common-sense precautions such as:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water every two hours, and always for at least 20 seconds each time
  • Practice social distancing (stay at least six feet away from people whenever possible)
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick.

The City has advised all employees that they should stay home if they are experiencing symptoms of respiratory illness, including temperature over 100.4 degrees. In addition, the City has ordered hand sanitizer, cleaning wipes, and disinfectant sprays for all departments to assist with keeping surface areas clean, especially those that are public-facing.

Residents should check www.onelakewood.com and follow us on social media for further alerts regarding the cancellation of City meetings or events.

For the most up to date information on COVID-19, residents should visit the following websites:

The Ohio Department of Health has also set up a call center to answer questions regarding the Coronavirus. The call center is open seven days a week, from 9am to 8pm and can be reached at 1-833-427-5634.

Update March 13, 2020 7:00 PM

Updated: March 16, 2020

After careful consideration and to help ensure the safety of City of Lakewood residents and employees during the current state of emergency declared by Governor DeWine, the City of Lakewood – Division of Housing and Building will be open by appointment only until the state of emergency has passed.

To schedule an appointment, please call 216-529-6270.

After careful consideration and to ensure the safety of City of Lakewood residents and employees during the state of emergency declared by Governor DeWine, the City of Lakewood Building Department is suspending all non-essential interior inspections until further notice.  Additionally, the Building Department is suspending interior complaint inspections that do not have a life-safety component.  The Building Department will resume these inspections when the current COVID-19 state of emergency has passed. This suspension of inspections is for the protection of the public as well as Building Department personnel.

Scheduled property maintenance and safety inspections will be canceled until further notice.

The Building Department asks that any non-critical permit inspection be postponed until further notice until April 3rd, at the earliest, due to the COVID-19 health crisis. The Building Department is investigating methods to complete “remote” inspections, especially those not involving life-safety.

As a reminder, the City asks that residents take common-sense precautions such as:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water every two hours, and always for at least 20 seconds each time
  • Practice social distancing (stay at least six feet away from people whenever possible)
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick.

The City has advised all employees that they should stay home if they are experiencing symptoms of respiratory illness, including temperature over 100.4 degrees. In addition, the City has ordered hand sanitizer, cleaning wipes, and disinfectant sprays for all departments to assist with keeping surface areas clean, especially those that are public-facing.

Residents should check www.onelakewood.com and follow us on social media for further alerts regarding the cancellation of City meetings or events.

For the most up to date information on COVID-19, residents should visit the following websites:

The Ohio Department of Health has also set up a call center to answer questions regarding the Coronavirus. The call center is open seven days a week, from 9:00 am to 8:00 pm and can be reached at 1-833-427-5634.

Update March 13, 2020 4:00 PM

City Hall Annex Building Will Be Closed For In-Person Visits Effective March 16th

After careful consideration and to ensure the safety of City of Lakewood residents and employees during the state of emergency declared by Governor DeWine, the Lakewood City Hall Annex building, located across from City Hall at 12805 Detroit Avenue, will be closed to in-person visits effective Monday, March 16th, until further notice.  This building houses the Division of Tax, Division of Utility Billing, and the Division of Vital Statistics. These divisions will be staffed for phone calls and email inquiries during normal business hours.

The City offers multiple options for you to file and submit your tax return, as follows: 

Filing options

E-file and payment

  • File and pay your return online by clicking hereno drop off or mailing needed 

Short form

If assistance is needing in completing the tax return, please check the box on the L-1 form that states you would like the City to calculate your tax. Submit the form to our office with the appropriate documents such as W-2s, 1099s, page 1 of the Federal 1040, and Schedules 1, C, E, F, and K-1, if applicable.  Please be advised we are extending the short form deadline from March 15th to match the Federal deadline.

Interactive forms

  • Prepare your return and print the completed form to submit with the required documents and payment if necessary 

Blank individual tax forms

  • Print from our website
  • Pick up at Lakewood Public Library Main Branch and Madison Branch
  • Call the office at 216-529-6620 and we will mail a form to you

If assistance is needing in completing the tax return, please check the box on the L-1 form that states you would like the City to calculate your tax. Submit the form to our office with the appropriate forms such as W-2s, 1099’s, page 1 of the Federal 1040, and Schedules 1, C, E, F, and K-1, if applicable.  

Submission options

  • E-file and pay through the website, no drop off or mailing needed at this link: http://www.onelakewood.com/accordions/e-preparation-service/
  • Send by U.S. Postal Service mail
  • Drop off at drop-box located on the Alameda side of the Annex building
  • The office will be staffed for questions and payments over the phone at 216-529-6620. Please see the FAQs on this page for further information.

Utility Billing

To make a payment for your water bill you may:

  • Pay by phone with a credit or debit card by calling 216-529-6820 and choose Option 2.
  • Mail payment made by check or money order to our office directly or to our P.O. Box

City of Lakewood –
Division of Utility Billing
PO Box 77047
Cleveland, OH 44194-7047

  • In-person drop-off at the drop-box located on the Alameda side of the Annex building.
  • Pay online through an Automated Clearing House (ACH) electronic funds transfer.

Vital Statistics

Burial permits (funeral directors only) available by appointment only.  Please call ahead.

To request a birth or death certificate, please call 216-529-7690.

Please check the websites listed below for more information, particularly for tax return filing.  As further information develops, the City will react accordingly. Additionally, residents should check www.onelakewood.com and follow us on social media for further alerts.

Website information

Division of Municipal Income Tax – http://www.onelakewood.com/municipal-income-tax/
Division of Utility Billing – http://www.onelakewood.com/payment-taxes/pay-your-water-bill/
Division of Vital Statistics – http://www.onelakewood.com/findget/birthdeath-records/

Contact phone numbers

Division of Municipal Income Tax – 216-529-6620
Division of Utility Billing – 216-529-6820
Division of Vital Statistics – 216-529-7690

Email information

Division of Municipal Income Tax – taxdept@lakewoodoh.net

As a reminder, the City asks that residents take common-sense precautions such as:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water every two hours, and always for at least 20 seconds each time
  • Practice social distancing (stay at least six feet away from people whenever possible)
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick.

The City has advised all employees that they should stay home if they are experiencing symptoms of respiratory illness, including temperature over 100.4 degrees. In addition, the City has ordered hand sanitizer, cleaning wipes, and disinfectant sprays for all departments to assist with keeping surface areas clean, especially those that are public-facing.

Residents should check www.onelakewood.com and follow us on social media for further alerts regarding the cancellation of City meetings or events.

For the most up to date information on COVID-19, residents should visit the following websites:

The Ohio Department of Health has also set up a call center to answer questions regarding the Coronavirus. The call center is open seven days a week, from 9am to 8pm and can be reached at 1-833-427-5634.

Update March 13, 2020 3:30 PM

Pursuant to Governor Mike DeWine’s declared State of Emergency, please be advised that public access at city meetings may be restricted.  Any meeting that in-person attendance is restricted will be live streamed on the City of Lakewood website and will be recorded.  Those recordings will be available on the city’s website after the meeting.

COVID-19 Update March 12, 2020

The City of Lakewood continues to monitor the dynamic situation presented by the coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic.  As further information develops, the City is reacting accordingly.

While there is no reason for panic, the City of Lakewood is following direction from the Cuyahoga County Board of Health, the Ohio Department of Health, and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

In alignment with federal, state, and county guidance, the City’s strategy now is to mitigate the “community spread” of coronavirus.  To that end, the City of Lakewood is canceling the following meetings and programs:

Canceled: Lakewood Community Relations Advisory Commission Meeting
Thursday, March 12, 2020
6:30 PM
East Conference Room

Canceled: Records Commission Meeting
Monday, March 16, 2020
5:30 PM to 6:30 PM
Law Conference Room

Canceled: Keep Lakewood Beautiful Meeting
Wednesday, March 18, 2020
5:30 PM
Auditorium

Canceled: Animal Safety & Welfare Advisory Board
Wednesday, March 18, 2020
6:00 PM
East Conference Room

Canceled: Civil Service Commission Meeting
Thursday, March 19, 2020
8:00 AM
Law Conference Room

Canceled: Lakewood Youth Council
Thursday, March 26, 2020
6:00 PM
Auditorium

Canceled: Lakewood Heritage Advisory Board
Thursday, March 26, 2020
6:30 PM
East Conference Room

Mayor George met with her coronavirus task force this morning to understand and address the needs and challenges each part of city government faces.  There will be several programs, services, and facilities affected by the City’s mitigation strategy, as follows:

  • Lakewood’s Human Services Department is canceling senior programming and closing the Lawther Senior Center and the congregate dining at Fedor Manor, beginning on Monday, March 16th until further notice through April 3rd, at the earliest.
  • Lakewood Senior Services will continue to provide non-emergency transportation through our partnership with Senior Transportation Connections.
  • Lakewood residents currently receiving home-delivered meals will continue to order and receive their meals as they have in the past.
  • Individuals who are currently enrolled as a congregate lunch participant will receive a robocall to their home asking if they wish to be added to the Home Delivered Meal roster as resources are available. Call 521-1515 for more information.
  • If a senior has any other concerns, they can call the Senior Center for more information at 216-521-1515.
  • All early childhood programs offered at the Lakewood Family Room and the East End Family Room at Fedor will be cancelled until further notice April 3rd, at the earliest.  Please call 216-529-5018 with questions.
  • All H2O after school programs and service work will be suspended until further notice through April 3rd, at the earliest.
  • Breakfast with the Easter Bunny cancelled. Call 216-529-6045 with any further questions related to H2O.
  • All other Human Services questions can be answered at 216-529-6685.
  • Senior tax clinics will continue as scheduled. Participants should proceed to their appointment at the Lawther Center, call upon arrival, and a tax advisor will provide entry to the building.   All AARP Tax Clinics scheduled at Lawther Center have been cancelled effective Monday, March 16, 2020.
  • Any visitors to City Hall or other municipal buildings will have a sign-in sheet to preserve a record of visitors should the City be required to assist in tracking the spread of coronavirus.
  • City Hall is preparing non-essential staff for remote work.
  • Police and Fire personnel are currently outfitted with personal protective equipment to respond to situations involving sick or potentially sick individuals.
  • All events and rentals at Lakewood Park Woman’s Club Pavilion are canceled until further notice through April 3rd, at the earliest.
  • Voting at the Westerly Apartments polling location will be moved to Garfield Middle School. All other polling locations in Lakewood will stay in place.

Ohio Director of Health Dr. Amy Acton said today, “The steps we are taking now will absolutely save lives.”

With these facts in mind, Mayor Meghan George said, “I recognize the disruption to daily routines and planned events, but health and safety are my highest priority.  Any step I can take to slow the trajectory of coronavirus spreading in Lakewood is worth that disruption.”

As a reminder, the City asks that residents take common-sense precautions such as:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water every two hours, and always for at least 20 seconds each time
  • Practice social distancing (stay at least six feet away from people whenever possible)
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick.

The City has advised all employees that they should stay home if they are experiencing symptoms of respiratory illness, including temperature over 100.4 degrees. In addition, the City has ordered hand sanitizer, cleaning wipes, and disinfectant sprays for all departments to assist with keeping surface areas clean, especially those that are public-facing.

Residents should check www.onelakewood.com and follow us on social media for further alerts regarding the cancellation of City meetings or events.

For the most up to date information on COVID-19, residents should visit the following websites:

The Ohio Department of Health has also set up a call center to answer questions regarding the Coronavirus. The call center is open seven days a week, from 9am to 8pm and can be reached at 1-833-427-5634.

COVID-19 Update March 11, 2020

The City is taking COVID-19 seriously and would like to remind residents to stay informed as this is a fluid and rapidly changing situation.

In alignment with Governor DeWine and County Executive Budish’s recommendations, the City is exploring how it can provide services, specifically senior meals for those currently enrolled in our congregate nutrition program, by delivery as opposed to community gatherings. We are awaiting a response from the Western Reserve Areawide Agency on Aging regarding this service. In the meantime, the Lawther Center on Aging will continue to provide core services, but has decided to cancel all Division of Aging trips and the St. Patrick’s Day Potluck scheduled for March 16th.

The City has also received notice that the Westerly will no longer serve as a polling location for Precinct 3E (Ward 3) for the March 17th primary. As soon as we have the new polling information from the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections, we will share it with residents.

As for our first responders, we are well prepared for any emergency situation that may arise as there are infectious disease protocols already in place. We have received additional guidance from the CDC on criteria to follow should we receive a call involving a suspected COVID-19 case.

The City of Lakewood has an internal team meeting daily monitoring the COVID-19 situation closely.  Our efforts are focused on preventing the spread of COVID-19 and will continue to take guidance from the Cuyahoga County Board of Health and the CDC. We are prepared to make additional changes to policy as the situation evolves.

COVID-19 Update March 10, 2020

Yesterday, Governor Mike DeWine confirmed that three people in Cuyahoga County have tested positive for COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Those that have been in close contact with the three positive cases are currently quarantined at home for a minimum of 14 days.

While there is no reason for panic, the City of Lakewood will continue to closely monitor the situation and take direction from the Cuyahoga County Board of Health and the Center for Disease Control.

As a reminder, the City asks that residents take common-sense precautions such as washing your hands often with soap and water while avoiding close contact with people who are sick. The City has advised all employees that they should stay home if they are experiencing symptoms of respiratory illness including temperature over 100.4 degrees. In addition, the City has ordered hand sanitizer, cleaning wipes, and disinfectant sprays for all departments to assist with keeping surface areas, especially those that are public-facing, clean.

At this time, regional and City leadership are not canceling any major events. However, this situation is changing rapidly. Residents should check www.onelakewood.com and follow us on social media for alerts regarding the cancellation of City meetings or events.

For the most up to date information on COVID-19, residents should visit the following websites:

Centers for Disease Control: https://www.cdc.gov

Ohio Department of Health: https://odh.ohio.gov

Cuyahoga County Board of Health: https://www.ccbh.net/coronavirus/

The Ohio Department of Health has also set up a call center to answer questions regarding the Coronavirus. The call center is open seven days a week from 9 am to 8 pm and can be reached at 1-833-427-5634.


The City encourages everyone to follow these guidelines to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases like the Coronavirus and the flu:

For the most up to date information on COVID-19, please see the following links:

Centers for Disease Control

Ohio Department of Health

Cuyahoga County Board of Health

Cleveland Clinic’s FAQs about the Coronavirus